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New findings on astronaut vision loss

New findings on astronaut vision loss

ScienceDaily (May 30, 2012) — Could vision changes experienced by astronauts be linked to a vitamin B-12 or folate deficiency? While investigating the vision changes recently identified in astronauts, nutritional assessment data showed similarities to symptoms that occur with vitamin deficiencies, according to a new study published in the March edition of The Journal of Nutrition . Approximately 20 percent of astronauts living on the International Space Station have reported post-flight vision changes. Continue reading

Persistent sensory experience is good for aging brain

Persistent sensory experience is good for aging brain

ScienceDaily (May 24, 2012) — Despite a long-held scientific belief that much of the wiring of the brain is fixed by the time of adolescence, a new study shows that changes in sensory experience can cause massive rewiring of the brain, even as one ages. In addition, the study found that this rewiring involves fibers that supply the primary input to the cerebral cortex, the part of the brain that is responsible for sensory perception, motor control and cognition. Continue reading

Persistent sensory experience is good for aging brain

Persistent sensory experience is good for aging brain

ScienceDaily (May 24, 2012) — Despite a long-held scientific belief that much of the wiring of the brain is fixed by the time of adolescence, a new study shows that changes in sensory experience can cause massive rewiring of the brain, even as one ages. In addition, the study found that this rewiring involves fibers that supply the primary input to the cerebral cortex, the part of the brain that is responsible for sensory perception, motor control and cognition. These findings promise to open new avenues of research on brain remodeling and aging. Continue reading

Damaged connections in Phineas Gage’s brain: Famous 1848 case of man who survived accident has modern parallel

Damaged connections in Phineas Gage’s brain: Famous 1848 case of man who survived accident has modern parallel

ScienceDaily (May 16, 2012) — Poor Phineas Gage. In 1848, the supervisor for the Rutland and Burlington Railroad in Vermont was using a 13-pound, 3-foot-7-inch rod to pack blasting powder into a rock when he triggered an explosion that drove the rod through his left cheek and out of the top of his head. Continue reading

Damaged connections in Phineas Gage’s brain: Famous 1848 case of man who survived accident has modern parallel

Damaged connections in Phineas Gage’s brain: Famous 1848 case of man who survived accident has modern parallel

ScienceDaily (May 16, 2012) — Poor Phineas Gage. In 1848, the supervisor for the Rutland and Burlington Railroad in Vermont was using a 13-pound, 3-foot-7-inch rod to pack blasting powder into a rock when he triggered an explosion that drove the rod through his left cheek and out of the top of his head. As reported at the time, the rod was later found, “smeared with blood and brains.” Miraculously, Gage lived, becoming the most famous case in the history of neuroscience — not only because he survived a horrific accident that led to the destruction of much of his left frontal lobe but also because of the injury’s reported effects on his personality and behavior, which were said to be profound. Continue reading

Mild traumatic brain injury may contribute to brain network dysfunction

Mild traumatic brain injury may contribute to brain network dysfunction

ScienceDaily (May 11, 2012) — Even mild head injuries can cause significant abnormalities in brain function that last for several days, which may explain the neurological symptoms experienced by some individuals who have experienced a head injury associated with sports, accidents or combat, according to a study by Virginia Commonwealth University School of Medicine researchers. These findings, published in the May issue of the Journal of Neuroscience , advance research in the field of traumatic brain injury (TBI), enabling researchers to better understand what brain structural or functional changes underlie posttraumatic disorders — a question that until now has remained unclear. Continue reading

Anatomic existence of the elusive G-spot confirmed

Anatomic existence of the elusive G-spot confirmed

ScienceDaily (Apr. Continue reading

New genes contributing to autism and related neurodevelopmental disorders uncovered

New genes contributing to autism and related neurodevelopmental disorders uncovered

ScienceDaily (Apr. 20, 2012) — When chromosomes replicate, sometimes there is an exchange of genetic material within a chromosome or between two or more chromosomes without a significant loss of genetic material. This exchange, known as a balanced chromosomal abnormality (BCA), can cause rearrangements in the genetic code Continue reading

Scientists regenerate damaged mouse hearts by transforming scar tissue into beating heart muscle

Scientists regenerate damaged mouse hearts by transforming scar tissue into beating heart muscle

ScienceDaily (Apr. 18, 2012) — Scientists at the Gladstone Institutes just announced a research breakthrough in mice that one day may help doctors restore hearts damaged by heart attacks — by converting scar-forming cardiac cells into beating heart muscle. These scientists previously transformed such cells into cardiac muscle-like cells in petri dishes. Continue reading

Targeting glucagon pathway may offer a new approach to treating diabetes

Targeting glucagon pathway may offer a new approach to treating diabetes

ScienceDaily (Apr. Continue reading