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Target for treating dengue fever discovered

Target for treating dengue fever discovered

Two recent papers by a University of Colorado School of Medicine researcher and colleagues may help scientists develop treatments or vaccines for Dengue fever, West Nile virus, Yellow fever, Japanese encephalitis and other disease-causing flaviviruses. Jeffrey S. Continue reading

Researchers examine metabolism in defective cells

Researchers examine metabolism in defective cells

UAlberta researchers are taking a closer look at how two metabolic pathways interact to increase the lifespan of cells with mitochondrial defects. Magnus Friis (PhD ’10) is the lead author of the study, which was published online on April 10 and will be published in the April 24 issue of Cell Reports Continue reading

Researchers examine metabolism in defective cells

Researchers examine metabolism in defective cells

UAlberta researchers are taking a closer look at how two metabolic pathways interact to increase the lifespan of cells with mitochondrial defects. Magnus Friis (PhD ’10) is the lead author of the study, which was published online on April 10 and will be published in the April 24 issue of Cell Reports. Mitochondria produce energy for cells through oxidative metabolism, but the process produces toxic byproducts that can accumulate and cause defects in the cell’s mitochondria Continue reading

Protein researchers closing in on the mystery of schizophrenia

Protein researchers closing in on the mystery of schizophrenia

Schizophrenia is a severe disease for which there is still no effective medical treatment. In an attempt to understand exactly what happens in the brain of schizophrenic people, researchers from the University of Southern Denmark have analysed proteins in the brains of rats that have been given hallucinogenic drugs. This may pave the way for new and better medicines. Continue reading

Tumor-suppressor connects with histone protein to hinder gene expression

Tumor-suppressor connects with histone protein to hinder gene expression

A tumor-suppressing protein acts as a dimmer switch to dial down gene expression. It does this by reading a chemical message attached to another protein that’s tightly intertwined with DNA, a team led by scientists at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center reported at the AACR Annual Meeting 2014. The findings, also published in the journal Nature on April 10, provide evidence in support of the “histone code” hypothesis Continue reading

Tumor-suppressor connects with histone protein to hinder gene expression

Tumor-suppressor connects with histone protein to hinder gene expression

A tumor-suppressing protein acts as a dimmer switch to dial down gene expression. It does this by reading a chemical message attached to another protein that’s tightly intertwined with DNA, a team led by scientists at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center reported at the AACR Annual Meeting 2014. The findings, also published in the journal Nature on April 10, provide evidence in support of the “histone code” hypothesis. Continue reading

Chips with olestra cause body toxins to dip, study finds

Chips with olestra cause body toxins to dip, study finds

According to a clinical trial led by University of Cincinnati researchers, a snack food ingredient called olestra has been found to speed up the removal of toxins in the body. Results are reported in the April edition of the Journal of Nutritional Biochemistry. The trial demonstrated that olestra — a zero-calorie fat substitute found in low-calorie snack foods such as Pringles — could reduce the levels of serum polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in people who had been exposed to PCBs. Continue reading

Synthetic gene circuits pump up cell signals in study of neurodegenerative diseases

Synthetic gene circuits pump up cell signals in study of neurodegenerative diseases

Synthetic genetic circuitry created by researchers at Rice University is helping them see, for the first time, how to regulate cell mechanisms that degrade the misfolded proteins implicated in Parkinson’s, Huntington’s and other diseases. The Rice lab of chemical and biomolecular engineer Laura Segatori has designed a sophisticated circuit that signals increases in the degradation of proteins by the cell’s ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS). The research appears online today in Nature Communications Continue reading

Synthetic gene circuits pump up cell signals in study of neurodegenerative diseases

Synthetic gene circuits pump up cell signals in study of neurodegenerative diseases

Synthetic genetic circuitry created by researchers at Rice University is helping them see, for the first time, how to regulate cell mechanisms that degrade the misfolded proteins implicated in Parkinson’s, Huntington’s and other diseases. The Rice lab of chemical and biomolecular engineer Laura Segatori has designed a sophisticated circuit that signals increases in the degradation of proteins by the cell’s ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS). The research appears online today in Nature Communications Continue reading

Work with small peptide chains may revolutionize study of enzymes, diseases

Work with small peptide chains may revolutionize study of enzymes, diseases

Chemists in The College of Arts and Sciences have, for the first time, created enzyme-like activity using peptides that are only seven amino acids long. Continue reading