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New drug could treat Alzheimer’s, multiple sclerosis and brain injury

New drug could treat Alzheimer’s, multiple sclerosis and brain injury

ScienceDaily (July 24, 2012) — A new class of drug developed at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine shows early promise of being a one-size-fits-all therapy for Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, multiple sclerosis and traumatic brain injury by reducing inflammation in the brain. Northwestern has recently been issued patents to cover this new drug class and has licensed the commercial development to a biotech company that has recently completed the first human Phase 1 clinical trial for the drug Continue reading

Viruses’ copying mechanism demystified, opening the door to new vaccine strategies

Viruses’ copying mechanism demystified, opening the door to new vaccine strategies

ScienceDaily (July 19, 2012) — Certain kinds of viruses such as those that cause the common cold, SARS, hepatitis, and encephalitis, copy themselves using a unique mechanism, according to a team of Penn State scientists that includes David Boehr, an assistant professor of chemistry and a co-leader of the research team. Continue reading

Discovery of ‘hopping’ of bacterial enzyme gives insight into gene expression

Discovery of ‘hopping’ of bacterial enzyme gives insight into gene expression

ScienceDaily (July 17, 2012) — UC Santa Barbara researchers’ discovery of a variation of an enzyme’s ability to “hop” as it moves along DNA, modifying the genetic material of a bacteria — and its physical capability and behavior — holds much promise for biomedical and other scientific applications. Continue reading

Small molecule may play big role in Alzheimer’s disease

Small molecule may play big role in Alzheimer’s disease

ScienceDaily (July 9, 2012) — Alzheimer’s disease is one of the most dreaded and debilitating illnesses one can develop. Currently, the disease afflicts 6.5 million Americans and the Alzheimer’s Association projects it to increase to between 11 and 16 million, or 1 in 85 people, by 2050. Cell death in the brain causes one to grow forgetful, confused and, eventually, catatonic. Continue reading

Regulation by proteins outside cancer cells points to potential new drug target: Reprogram cancer cells to state of permanent dormancy?

Regulation by proteins outside cancer cells points to potential new drug target: Reprogram cancer cells to state of permanent dormancy?

ScienceDaily (July 9, 2012) — Protein interactions outside breast cancer cells can send signals to the cancer cells to permanently stop proliferating, a new study showed in the School of Medicine at The University of Texas Health Science Center San Antonio. “Because this protein cascade is outside the cells, it is likely amenable to therapeutic manipulation,” said lead author Yuzuru Shiio, M.D., Ph.D., assistant professor of biochemistry at the university’s Greehey Children’s Cancer Research Institute. “I hope our study will ultimately lead to a therapeutic strategy to reprogram cancer cells to a state of permanent dormancy.” He cautions that the finding was observed in cell cultures and is still far from human cancer therapy Continue reading

New avenue to better medicines: Metal-peptide complexes

New avenue to better medicines: Metal-peptide complexes

ScienceDaily (July 9, 2012) — Researchers at the RUB and from Berkeley have used metal complexes to modify peptide hormones. In the Journal of the American Chemical Society , they report for the first time on the three-dimensional structure of the resulting metal-peptide compounds. “With this work, we have laid the molecular foundation for the development of better medicines” says Prof. Continue reading

New avenue to better medicines: Metal-peptide complexes

New avenue to better medicines: Metal-peptide complexes

ScienceDaily (July 9, 2012) — Researchers at the RUB and from Berkeley have used metal complexes to modify peptide hormones. In the Journal of the American Chemical Society , they report for the first time on the three-dimensional structure of the resulting metal-peptide compounds. “With this work, we have laid the molecular foundation for the development of better medicines” says Prof. Continue reading

Epigenetics alters genes in rheumatoid arthritis

Epigenetics alters genes in rheumatoid arthritis

ScienceDaily (July 3, 2012) — It’s not just our DNA that makes us susceptible to disease and influences its impact and outcome. Scientists are beginning to realize more and more that important changes in genes that are unrelated to changes in the DNA sequence itself — a field of study known as epigenetics — are equally influential. A research team at the University of California, San Diego — led by Gary S. Continue reading

Discovery increases understanding how bacteria spread

Discovery increases understanding how bacteria spread

ScienceDaily (June 20, 2012) — A Faculty of Medicine & Dentistry researcher is moving closer to understanding how infectious bacteria spread. In a study published in the high-impact Cell Press journal called Structure , Joel Weiner and his collaborators, Gerd Prehna and Natalie Stynadka at the University of British Columbia, share new knowledge about how bacteria release proteins Continue reading

Scientists discover how key enzyme involved in aging, cancer assembles

Scientists discover how key enzyme involved in aging, cancer assembles

ScienceDaily (June 19, 2012) — UCLA biochemists have mapped the structure of a key protein-RNA complex that is required for the assembly of telomerase, an enzyme important in both cancer and aging. The researchers found that a region at the end of the p65 protein that includes a flexible tail is responsible for bending telomerase’s RNA backbone in order to create a scaffold for the assembly of other protein building blocks. Understanding this protein, which is found in a type of single-celled organism that lives in fresh water ponds, may help researchers predict the function of similar proteins in humans and other organisms Continue reading