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New way to inhibit blood clotting and inflammation

New way to inhibit blood clotting and inflammation

ScienceDaily (Nov. 6, 2012) — Scientists have identified a group of small molecules that interfere with the activity of a compound that initiates multiple steps in blood clotting, including those that lead to the obstruction of veins or arteries, a condition called thrombosis. Continue reading

Cancer bound: How some carcinogens evade removal by stabilizing the very DNA they attack

Cancer bound: How some carcinogens evade removal by stabilizing the very DNA they attack

ScienceDaily (Nov. 2, 2012) — A person doesn’t have to go far to find a polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) Continue reading

Academia should fulfill social contract by supporting bioscience startups, case study says

Academia should fulfill social contract by supporting bioscience startups, case study says

ScienceDaily (Oct. 25, 2012) — Universities not only provide the ideal petri dish for cultivating bioscience with commercial potential, but have a moral obligation to do so, given the opportunity to translate public funding into health and jobs, according to a new case study by UCSF researchers. Continue reading

New drug delivery system for bladder cancer using nanoparticles

New drug delivery system for bladder cancer using nanoparticles

ScienceDaily (Oct. Continue reading

New target for cancer research uncovered

New target for cancer research uncovered

ScienceDaily (Oct. 24, 2012) — In a new paper released October 24 in Nature , BioFrontiers Institute scientists at the University of Colorado Boulder, Tom Cech and Leslie Leinwand, detailed a new target for anti-cancer drug development that is sitting at the ends of our DNA. Continue reading

3-D structure of an unmodified G protein-coupled receptor in its natural habitat

3-D structure of an unmodified G protein-coupled receptor in its natural habitat

ScienceDaily (Oct. 22, 2012) — Scientists have determined the three-dimensional structure of a complete, unmodified G-protein-coupled receptor in its native environment: embedded in a membrane in physiological conditions. Using NMR spectroscopy, the team mapped the arrangement of atoms in a protein called CXCR1, which detects the inflammatory signal interleukin 8 and, through a G protein located inside the cell, triggers a cascade of events that can mobilize immune cells, for example Continue reading

3-D structure of an unmodified G protein-coupled receptor in its natural habitat

3-D structure of an unmodified G protein-coupled receptor in its natural habitat

ScienceDaily (Oct. 22, 2012) — Scientists have determined the three-dimensional structure of a complete, unmodified G-protein-coupled receptor in its native environment: embedded in a membrane in physiological conditions. Using NMR spectroscopy, the team mapped the arrangement of atoms in a protein called CXCR1, which detects the inflammatory signal interleukin 8 and, through a G protein located inside the cell, triggers a cascade of events that can mobilize immune cells, for example Continue reading

Cholera discovery could revolutionize antibiotic delivery

Cholera discovery could revolutionize antibiotic delivery

ScienceDaily (Oct. 19, 2012) — Three Simon Fraser University scientists are among six researchers who’ve made a discovery that could help revolutionize antibiotic treatment of deadly bacteria. Continue reading

Cholera discovery could revolutionize antibiotic delivery

Cholera discovery could revolutionize antibiotic delivery

ScienceDaily (Oct. 19, 2012) — Three Simon Fraser University scientists are among six researchers who’ve made a discovery that could help revolutionize antibiotic treatment of deadly bacteria. Lisa Craig, Christopher Ford and Subramaniapillai Kolappan, SFU researchers in molecular biology and biochemistry, have explained how Vibrio cholerae became a deadly pathogen thousands of years ago. Continue reading

Nurture trumps nature in study of oral bacteria in human twins, study finds

Nurture trumps nature in study of oral bacteria in human twins, study finds

ScienceDaily (Oct. Continue reading