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Survival molecule helps cancer cells hide from the immune system

Survival molecule helps cancer cells hide from the immune system

A molecule that helps cancer cells evade programmed self-destruction, an internal source of death, might also help malignant cells hide from the immune system, an external source of death. A new study by researchers at The Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center — Arthur G. James Cancer Hospital and Richard J Continue reading

Autoimmune diseases, chronic inflammations: Advancing research

Autoimmune diseases, chronic inflammations: Advancing research

The immune system functions as the body’s police force, protecting it from intruders like bacteria and viruses. However, in order to ascertain what is happening in the cell it requires information on the foreign invaders Continue reading

Autoimmune diseases, chronic inflammations: Advancing research

Autoimmune diseases, chronic inflammations: Advancing research

The immune system functions as the body’s police force, protecting it from intruders like bacteria and viruses. However, in order to ascertain what is happening in the cell it requires information on the foreign invaders Continue reading

Autoimmune diseases, chronic inflammations: Advancing research

Autoimmune diseases, chronic inflammations: Advancing research

The immune system functions as the body’s police force, protecting it from intruders like bacteria and viruses. However, in order to ascertain what is happening in the cell it requires information on the foreign invaders. This task is assumed by so-called immunoproteasomes Continue reading

Search for better biofuels microbes leads to human gut

Search for better biofuels microbes leads to human gut

Scientists have scoured cow rumens and termite guts for microbes that can efficiently break down plant cell walls for the production of next-generation biofuels, but some of the best microbial candidates actually may reside in the human lower intestine, researchers report. Continue reading

Old drug may be key to new antibiotics

Old drug may be key to new antibiotics

McMaster scientists have found that an anticonvulsant drug may help in developing a new class of antibiotics. Although dozens of antibiotics target what bacteria do, their study has looked at how a certain part of bacteria are created, and they found there is a way of stopping it. The discovery is important as there is growing concern worldwide about how antibiotic resistance is making the cures for infections ineffective. Continue reading

Lack of thyroid hormone blocks hearing development

Lack of thyroid hormone blocks hearing development

Fatigue, weight gain, chills, hair loss, anxiety, excessive perspiration — these symptoms are a few of the signs that the thyroid gland, which regulates the body’s heart rate and plays a crucial role in its metabolism, has gone haywire. Now, new research from Tel Aviv University points to an additional complication caused by thyroid imbalance: congenital deafness. Continue reading

Lack of thyroid hormone blocks hearing development

Lack of thyroid hormone blocks hearing development

Fatigue, weight gain, chills, hair loss, anxiety, excessive perspiration — these symptoms are a few of the signs that the thyroid gland, which regulates the body’s heart rate and plays a crucial role in its metabolism, has gone haywire. Now, new research from Tel Aviv University points to an additional complication caused by thyroid imbalance: congenital deafness. Continue reading

Lack of thyroid hormone blocks hearing development

Lack of thyroid hormone blocks hearing development

Fatigue, weight gain, chills, hair loss, anxiety, excessive perspiration — these symptoms are a few of the signs that the thyroid gland, which regulates the body’s heart rate and plays a crucial role in its metabolism, has gone haywire. Now, new research from Tel Aviv University points to an additional complication caused by thyroid imbalance: congenital deafness. Continue reading

Program predicts placement of chemical tags that control gene activity

Program predicts placement of chemical tags that control gene activity

Biochemists working at the University of California, San Diego, have developed a program that predicts the placement of chemical marks that control the activity of genes based on sequences of DNA. They describe their analysis and report results from its application to human embryonic cells in a paper published in Nature Methods online September 21. “All of our cells have the same blueprint, the same DNA, although they serve separate functions,” said John Whitaker, lead author of the report Continue reading