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New ways to treat solid tumors using protein

New ways to treat solid tumors using protein

An international team of scientists has shown that an antibody against the protein EphA3, found in the micro-environment of solid cancers, has anti-tumor effects. As EphA3 is present in normal organs only during embryonic development but is expressed in blood cancers and in solid tumors, this antibody-based approach may be a suitable candidate treatment for solid tumors. The researchers from Monash University and Ludwig Cancer Research, in Australia, and KaloBios Pharmaceuticals, in the US, have had their findings published in the journal Cancer Research . Continue reading

Lead released from African cookware contaminates food

Lead released from African cookware contaminates food

Lead levels in foods prepared in aluminum pots from Cameroon exceed U.S. Continue reading

Discovery yields master regulator of toxin production in staph infections

Discovery yields master regulator of toxin production in staph infections

St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital scientists have discovered an enzyme that regulates production of the toxins that contribute to potentially life-threatening Staphylococcus aureus infections. The study recently appeared in the scientific journal the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences ( PNAS ). Continue reading

Discovery yields master regulator of toxin production in staph infections

Discovery yields master regulator of toxin production in staph infections

St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital scientists have discovered an enzyme that regulates production of the toxins that contribute to potentially life-threatening Staphylococcus aureus infections. The study recently appeared in the scientific journal the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences ( PNAS ). Continue reading

New tools advance bio-logic

New tools advance bio-logic

Researchers at Rice University and the University of Kansas Medical Center are making genetic circuits that can perform more complex tasks by swapping protein building blocks. The modular genetic circuits engineered from parts of otherwise unrelated bacterial genomes can be set up to handle multiple chemical inputs simultaneously with a minimum of interference from their neighbors Continue reading

New cellular garbage control pathway with relevance for human neurodegenerative diseases

New cellular garbage control pathway with relevance for human neurodegenerative diseases

Several human neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s and Huntington’s disease but also aging, are linked to an accumulation of abnormal and aggregated proteins in cells. Cellular “garbage” of this type can be removed from cells by sweeping them to a cellular recycling station known as the lysosome Continue reading

Effects of starvation can be passed to future generations, through small RNAs apparently without DNA involvement

Effects of starvation can be passed to future generations, through small RNAs apparently without DNA involvement

Evidence from human famines and animal studies suggests that starvation can affect the health of descendants of famished individuals. But how such an acquired trait might be transmitted from one generation to the next has not been clear Continue reading

Cholesterol-lowering drugs may reduce cardiovascular death in type 2 diabetes

Cholesterol-lowering drugs may reduce cardiovascular death in type 2 diabetes

Heart disease and stroke are the leading causes of death and disability among people with Type 2 diabetes. In fact, at least 65 percent of people with diabetes die from some form of heart disease or stroke, according to the American Heart Association. However, a new study by researchers at Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center suggests that the use of cholesterol-lowering statins may help prolong the lives of people with diabetic cardiovascular disease. Continue reading

Protein’s ‘hands’ enable bacteria to establish infection, research finds

Protein’s ‘hands’ enable bacteria to establish infection, research finds

When it comes to infecting humans and animals, bacteria need a helping hand. Kansas State University biochemists have found the helping hand: groups of tiny protein loops on the surface of cells. These loops are similar to the fingers of a hand, and by observing seven individual loops on the surface of E. Continue reading

Drug shows promise for effectively treating metabolic syndrome

Drug shows promise for effectively treating metabolic syndrome

University of Utah researchers have discovered that an enzyme involved in intracellular signaling plays a crucial role in developing metabolic syndrome, a finding that has a U of U spinoff company developing a drug to potentially treat the condition. The researchers, led by Jared Rutter, Ph.D., professor of biochemistry, hope to begin human clinical trials of a drug in the next couple of years. Continue reading