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Fighting neuroblastomas by blocking DNA replication, repair

Fighting neuroblastomas by blocking DNA replication, repair

Neuroblastoma is one of the deadliest childhood cancers, accounting for 15 percent of pediatric cancer deaths. For patients with high-risk neuroblastomas, the five-year survival rate is 40 to 50 percent even with the most rigorous treatments available today Continue reading

Fighting neuroblastomas by blocking DNA replication, repair

Fighting neuroblastomas by blocking DNA replication, repair

Neuroblastoma is one of the deadliest childhood cancers, accounting for 15 percent of pediatric cancer deaths. For patients with high-risk neuroblastomas, the five-year survival rate is 40 to 50 percent even with the most rigorous treatments available today. But those odds may improve soon, thanks to a new compound developed by City of Hope scientists Continue reading

Potent, puzzling and (now less) toxic: Team discovers how antifungal drug works

Potent, puzzling and (now less) toxic: Team discovers how antifungal drug works

Scientists have solved a decades-old medical mystery — and in the process have found a potentially less toxic way to fight invasive fungal infections, which kill about 1.5 million people a year. The researchers say they now understand the mechanism of action of amphotericin, an antifungal drug that has been in use for more than 50 years — even though it is nearly as toxic to human cells as it is to the microbes it attacks. Continue reading

Potent, puzzling and (now less) toxic: Team discovers how antifungal drug works

Potent, puzzling and (now less) toxic: Team discovers how antifungal drug works

Scientists have solved a decades-old medical mystery — and in the process have found a potentially less toxic way to fight invasive fungal infections, which kill about 1.5 million people a year. The researchers say they now understand the mechanism of action of amphotericin, an antifungal drug that has been in use for more than 50 years — even though it is nearly as toxic to human cells as it is to the microbes it attacks. Continue reading

Sharpening microscope images: New technique takes cues from astronomy, ophthalmology

Sharpening microscope images: New technique takes cues from astronomy, ophthalmology

The complexity of biology can befuddle even the most sophisticated light microscopes. Continue reading

Guns aren’t the only things killing cops

Guns aren’t the only things killing cops

The public does not realize — in fact, police themselves may not realize — that the dangers police officers are exposed to on a daily basis are far worse than anything on “Law and Order.” “Police officers are exposed to danger from so many different elements — many of them unexpected — that they are dying not just on the job, but for the job,” says University at Buffalo epidemiologist John Violanti, PhD, an expert on police culture, psychological stress, illness and mortality. And they are dying younger than the rest of us Continue reading

Development of new cell models that report circadian clock function

Development of new cell models that report circadian clock function

Researchers at the University of Memphis and University of Pennsylvania report the development of robust new liver and fat cell models that report circadian clock function. These models are amenable to high throughput drug screening and could be used to find promising small molecules to resynchronize or help body clocks function normally. The consequences of modern life, eating and staying up later, shift work, cell phone addiction, and travel across time zones, all disturb internal clocks. Continue reading

Protein researchers closing in on the mystery of schizophrenia

Protein researchers closing in on the mystery of schizophrenia

Schizophrenia is a severe disease for which there is still no effective medical treatment. In an attempt to understand exactly what happens in the brain of schizophrenic people, researchers from the University of Southern Denmark have analysed proteins in the brains of rats that have been given hallucinogenic drugs. This may pave the way for new and better medicines. Continue reading

Splice variants reveal connections among autism genes

Splice variants reveal connections among autism genes

A team of researchers from the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine and the Center for Cancer Systems Biology (CCSB) at the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute has uncovered a new aspect of autism, revealing that proteins involved in autism interact with many more partners than previously known. These interactions had not been detected earlier because they involve alternatively spliced forms of autism genes found in the brain. In their study, published in the April 11, 2014 online issue of Nature Communications , the scientists isolated hundreds of new variants of autism genes from the human brain, and then screened their protein products against thousands of other proteins to identify interacting partners. Continue reading

New drug, molecular insight into triple negative breast cancers

New drug, molecular insight into triple negative breast cancers

Most breast cancers are treated by blocking their addictions, for example depriving estrogen-fueled tumors of estrogen. Continue reading