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Noninvasive brain control: New light-sensitive protein enables simpler, more powerful optogenetics

Noninvasive brain control: New light-sensitive protein enables simpler, more powerful optogenetics

Optogenetics, a technology that allows scientists to control brain activity by shining light on neurons, relies on light-sensitive proteins that can suppress or stimulate electrical signals within cells. This technique requires a light source to be implanted in the brain, where it can reach the cells to be controlled Continue reading

Cetuximab or bevacizumab with combi chemo equivalent in KRAS wild-type MCRC

Cetuximab or bevacizumab with combi chemo equivalent in KRAS wild-type MCRC

For patients with KRAS wild-type untreated colorectal cancer, adding cetuximab or bevacizumab to combination chemotherapy offers equivalent survival, researchers said at the ESMO 16th World Congress on Gastrointestinal Cancer in Barcelona. “The CALGB/SWOG 80405 trial was designed and formulated in 2005, and the rationale was simple: we had new drugs –bevacizumab and cetuximab– and the study was designed to determine if one was better than the other in first-line for patients with colon cancer,” said lead study author Alan P. Venook, distinguished Professor of Medical Oncology and Translational Research at the University of California, San Francisco, USA Continue reading

Potential Alzheimer’s drug prevents abnormal blood clots in brain

Potential Alzheimer’s drug prevents abnormal blood clots in brain

Without a steady supply of blood, neurons can’t work. Continue reading

Early life stress can leave lasting impacts on the brain

Early life stress can leave lasting impacts on the brain

For children, stress can go a long way. Continue reading

Early life stress can leave lasting impacts on the brain

Early life stress can leave lasting impacts on the brain

For children, stress can go a long way. A little bit provides a platform for learning, adapting and coping. Continue reading

The social psychology of nerve cells

The social psychology of nerve cells

The functional organization of the central nervous system depends upon a precise architecture and connectivity of distinct types of neurons. Multiple cell types are present within any brain structure, but the rules governing their positioning, and the molecular mechanisms mediating those rules, have been relatively unexplored. A new study by UC Santa Barbara researchers demonstrates that a particular neuron, the cholinergic amacrine cell, creates a “personal space” in much the same way that people distance themselves from one another in an elevator. Continue reading

You can’t teach speed: Sprinters break 10-year rule

You can’t teach speed: Sprinters break 10-year rule

New research shows world-class sprinters are born, not created. Grand Valley State University researchers found that exceptional speed prior to formal training is a prerequisite for becoming a world-class sprinter. The findings are published in the online journal PeerJ Continue reading

Role of cohesin in cancer revised by researcher

Role of cohesin in cancer revised by researcher

Massive sequencing of cancer genomes brings to light new genes every day that could be involved in the process of tumour formation. Continue reading

Virus kills triple negative breast cancer cells, tumor cells in mice

Virus kills triple negative breast cancer cells, tumor cells in mice

A virus not known to cause disease kills triple-negative breast cancer cells and killed tumors grown from these cells in mice, according to Penn State College of Medicine researchers. Understanding how the virus kills cancer may lead to new treatments for breast cancer Continue reading

Cell division discovery could optimize timing of chemotherapy, explain some cancers

Cell division discovery could optimize timing of chemotherapy, explain some cancers

Research led by the University of Warwick’s Systems Biology Centre and Warwick Medical School in collaboration with groups in Nice and Rotterdam has been able to demonstrate how the cycle of cell division in mammalian cells synchronizes with the body’s own daily rhythm, its circadian clock. The study not only helps to explain why people with sustained disrupted circadian rhythms can be more susceptible to cancer, it may also help establish the optimal time of day to administer chemotherapy. Continue reading