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Family violence leaves genetic imprint on children

Family violence leaves genetic imprint on children

A new Tulane University School of Medicine study finds that the more fractured families are by domestic violence or trauma, the more likely that children will bear the scars down to their DNA. Researchers discovered that children in homes affected by domestic violence, suicide or the incarceration of a family member have significantly shorter telomeres, which is a cellular marker of aging, than those in stable households. The findings are published online in the latest issue of the journal Pediatrics Continue reading

Could ‘fragile Y hypothesis’ explain chromosome loss?

Could ‘fragile Y hypothesis’ explain chromosome loss?

A UT Arlington research team says their study of genetic information from more than 4,000 beetle species has yielded a new theory about why some species lose their Y chromosome and others, such as humans, hang on to it. They call it the “fragile Y hypothesis.” The biologists’ idea is that the fate of the Y chromosome is heavily influenced by how meiosis, or the production of sperm, works in an organism Continue reading

Cellular signalling for kidney regeneration discovered

Cellular signalling for kidney regeneration discovered

Doctors and scientists have for years been astonished to observe patients with kidney disease experiencing renal regeneration. The kidney, unlike its neighbor the liver, was universally understood to be a static organ once it had fully developed. Continue reading

Cellular signalling for kidney regeneration discovered

Cellular signalling for kidney regeneration discovered

Doctors and scientists have for years been astonished to observe patients with kidney disease experiencing renal regeneration. The kidney, unlike its neighbor the liver, was universally understood to be a static organ once it had fully developed. Now a new study conducted by researchers at Sheba Medical Center, Tel Aviv University, and Stanford University turns that theory on its head by pinpointing the precise cellular signalling responsible for renal regeneration and exposing the multi-layered nature of kidney growth Continue reading

Effective drugs for Parkinson’s reduce symptoms of Rett syndrome in mice

Effective drugs for Parkinson’s reduce symptoms of Rett syndrome in mice

IDIBELL researchers, led by the director of the Program for Epigenetics and Cancer Biology, ICREA researcher and Professor of Genetics at the University of Barcelona, ​​Manel Esteller, have shown that a combination of effective drugs for Parkinson’s disease in mice that are used as a model of human Rett syndrome reduces some of the symptoms associated with this disease. The results of the study are published in the journal Neuropsycopharmacology . Second leading cause of mental retardation in females Rett syndrome is the second most common cause of mental retardation in women, after Down syndrome. Continue reading

Genetic influence on pulmonary function: six further genes identified

Genetic influence on pulmonary function: six further genes identified

In an analysis of several genome-wide association studies, an international team of scientists has identified six novel gene regions that are associated with the function of the lungs. Their results have been published in the current issue of the Nature Genetics scientific journal. In their investigations or so-called genome-wide association studies, the team of researchers compared the genetic profile of study participants to the forced vital capacity (FVC), a volume parameter of lung function Continue reading

Involving a genetic health care professional may improve quality, reduce unnecessary testing

Involving a genetic health care professional may improve quality, reduce unnecessary testing

A new Moffitt Cancer Center study published Thursday in Genetics in Medicine shows that counseling from a genetic health care provider before genetic testing educates patients and may help reduce unnecessary procedures. Up to 10 percent of cancers are inherited, meaning a person was born with an abnormal gene that increases their risk for cancer Continue reading

Involving a genetic health care professional may improve quality, reduce unnecessary testing

Involving a genetic health care professional may improve quality, reduce unnecessary testing

A new Moffitt Cancer Center study published Thursday in Genetics in Medicine shows that counseling from a genetic health care provider before genetic testing educates patients and may help reduce unnecessary procedures. Continue reading

Severe scoliosis linked to rare mutations

Severe scoliosis linked to rare mutations

Children with rare mutations in two genes are about four times more likely to develop severe scoliosis than their peers with normal versions of the genes, scientists have found. The research at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Continue reading

Genotyping can predict disease outcomes in rheumatoid arthritis patients

Genotyping can predict disease outcomes in rheumatoid arthritis patients

New cohort studies presented today at the European League Against Rheumatism Annual Congress (EULAR 2014) have shown the amino acid valine at position 11 of HLA-DRB1 gene to be the strongest independent genetic determinant of radiological damage in rheumatoid arthritis (RA).1 In addition, positions 71 and 74 were found to represent independent predictors, with the three positions together: 11, 71 and 74 strongly associated with disease outcomes.1 According to lead author Dr Sebastien Viatte of the Arthritis Research UK Centre for Genetics and Genomics, Manchester, United Kingdom, “this major advance in genetics might allow stratification of RA patients at the onset of their disease to identify those at risk of joint damage and early death, and also those who are more likely to respond to anti-TNF biological therapy.” RA is a common chronic inflammatory autoimmune disease characterised by inflammation of synovial joints leading to damage to the inside of the joint and surrounding soft tissues. The cause of RA is largely unknown, but both environmental factors and genetic susceptibility appear to be involved. Although the prevalence of RA is relatively constant in most countries at between 0.5-1.0 percent, the higher occurrence among native American-Indian populations and very low occurrence in China and Japan supports the strong influence of genotype on the epidemiology.2 Previously, a group of alleles on the HLA DRB1 gene, known as the ‘shared epitope’ was thought to have the strongest effect on RA susceptibility. Continue reading