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Fecal transplants restore healthy bacteria and gut functions

Fecal transplants restore healthy bacteria and gut functions

Fecal microbiota transplantation — the process of delivering stool bacteria from a healthy donor to a patient suffering from intestinal infection with the bacterium Clostridium difficile — works by restoring healthy bacteria and functioning to the recipient’s gut, according to a study published this week in mBio ®, the online open-access journal of the American Society for Microbiology. Continue reading

Reversal of type 1 diabetes in mice may eventually help humans

Reversal of type 1 diabetes in mice may eventually help humans

Investigators at the University of Cincinnati (UC) have found a therapy that reverses new onset Type 1 diabetes in mouse models and may advance efforts in combating the disease among humans. The study, led by William Ridgway, MD, was presented Saturday, June 14, 2014, at the American Diabetes Association’s 74th Scientific Sessions in San Francisco. Continue reading

Novel approach to reactivate latent HIV found

Novel approach to reactivate latent HIV found

A team of scientists at the Gladstone Institutes has identified a new way to make latent HIV reveal itself, which could help overcome one of the biggest obstacles to finding a cure for HIV infection. They discovered that increasing the random activity, or noise, associated with HIV gene expression-without increasing the average level of gene expression-can reactivate latent HIV. Their findings were published in the journal Science Continue reading

Hemorrhagic Fevers Can Be Caused by Body’s Antiviral Interferon Response

Hemorrhagic Fevers Can Be Caused by Body’s Antiviral Interferon Response

Hemorrhagic fevers caused by Lassa, dengue and other viruses affect more than one million people annually and are often fatal, yet scientists have never understood why only some virus-infected people come down with the disease and others do not. But now, virologists and immunologists at The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) have found a major clue to the mystery of “hemorrhagic fever” syndromes. In findings reported this week in an Early Edition of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences , the team showed that Interferon Type I (IFN-I) immune proteins are key drivers of a viral syndrome in mice that closely mimics these human hemorrhagic fevers Continue reading

Hemorrhagic Fevers Can Be Caused by Body’s Antiviral Interferon Response

Hemorrhagic Fevers Can Be Caused by Body’s Antiviral Interferon Response

Hemorrhagic fevers caused by Lassa, dengue and other viruses affect more than one million people annually and are often fatal, yet scientists have never understood why only some virus-infected people come down with the disease and others do not. But now, virologists and immunologists at The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) have found a major clue to the mystery of “hemorrhagic fever” syndromes Continue reading

No harm in yoga: But not much help for asthma sufferers, study finds

No harm in yoga: But not much help for asthma sufferers, study finds

Yoga has long been promoted as a method for improving physical and mental well-being. Continue reading

No harm in yoga: But not much help for asthma sufferers, study finds

No harm in yoga: But not much help for asthma sufferers, study finds

Yoga has long been promoted as a method for improving physical and mental well-being. And although yoga is often suggested to asthma sufferers to help alleviate symptoms, a new study found little evidence that yoga will improve symptoms Continue reading

Major discovery on the mechanism of drug resistance in leukemia and other cancers

Major discovery on the mechanism of drug resistance in leukemia and other cancers

A mechanism that enables the development of resistance to Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML) anticancer drugs, thereby leading to relapse, has been identified by Kathy Borden of the University of Montreal’s Institute for Research in Immunology and Cancer (IRIC) and her collaborators. Kathy Borden is a Principal Investigator at IRIC and a professor at the university’s Department of Pathology and Cell Biology. Continue reading

Immune system precursor cells that fight infection discovered

Immune system precursor cells that fight infection discovered

The innate immune system recognizes infectious agents such as viruses and bacteria. A group of lymphocytes known as “innate lymphoid cells” or ILCs plays a central role in the defense of the human body against infective agents. Professor Andreas Diefenbach of the Research Center Immunology at the Mainz University Medical Center, working in collaboration with scientists at the University of Freiburg, has discovered previously unidentified ILCs that are able to protect epithelial surfaces, such as those of the intestinal mucosa, against infection Continue reading

Immune system precursor cells that fight infection discovered

Immune system precursor cells that fight infection discovered

The innate immune system recognizes infectious agents such as viruses and bacteria. A group of lymphocytes known as “innate lymphoid cells” or ILCs plays a central role in the defense of the human body against infective agents. Professor Andreas Diefenbach of the Research Center Immunology at the Mainz University Medical Center, working in collaboration with scientists at the University of Freiburg, has discovered previously unidentified ILCs that are able to protect epithelial surfaces, such as those of the intestinal mucosa, against infection. Continue reading