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Population of neutrophils in body found by researchers

Population of neutrophils in body found by researchers

Case Western Reserve University researchers have discovered a novel population of neutrophils, which are the body’s infection control workhorses. These cells have an enhanced microbial killing ability and are thereby better able to control infection. Continue reading

Chronic sleep disturbance could trigger onset of Alzheimer’s

Chronic sleep disturbance could trigger onset of Alzheimer’s

People who experience chronic sleep disturbance — either through their work, insomnia or other reasons — could face an earlier onset of dementia and Alzheimer’s, according to a new pre-clinical study by researchers at Temple University. “The big biological question that we tried to address in this study is whether sleep disturbance is a risk factor to develop Alzheimer’s or is it something that manifests with the disease,” said Domenico Praticò, professor of pharmacology and microbiology/immunology in Temple’s School of Medicine, who led the study. Initially, the researchers looked at longitudinal studies which indicated that people who reported chronic sleep disturbances often developed Alzheimer’s disease Continue reading

Pathways that direct immune system to turn ‘on’ or ‘off’ found

Pathways that direct immune system to turn ‘on’ or ‘off’ found

A key discovery explaining how components of the immune system determine whether to activate or to suppress the immune system, made by Kelvin Lee, MD, Professor of Oncology and Co-Leader of the Tumor Immunology and Immunotherapy Program at Roswell Park Cancer Institute (RPCI), and colleagues led to published findings being selected as the “Paper of the Week” by the Journal of Biological Chemistry (JBC). Continue reading

Air pollution primes children for asthma-related cockroach allergy

Air pollution primes children for asthma-related cockroach allergy

Feb. 6, 2013 — An allergic reaction to cockroaches is a major contributor to asthma in urban children, but new research suggests that the insects are just one part of a more complex story. Very early exposure to certain components of air pollution can increase the risk of developing a cockroach allergy by age 7 and children with a common mutation in a gene called GSTM may be especially vulnerable Continue reading

Genetically modified tobacco plants produce antibodies to treat rabies

Genetically modified tobacco plants produce antibodies to treat rabies

Feb. 1, 2013 — Smoking tobacco might be bad for your health, but a genetically altered version of the plant might provide a relatively inexpensive cure for the deadly rabies virus. In a new research report appearing in The FASEB Journal , scientists produced a monoclonal antibody in transgenic tobacco plants that was shown to neutralize the rabies virus. Continue reading

Two-step immunotherapy attacks advanced ovarian cancer

Two-step immunotherapy attacks advanced ovarian cancer

Jan. 31, 2013 — Most ovarian cancer patients are diagnosed with late stage disease that is unresponsive to existing therapies. In a new study, researchers from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine show that a two-step personalized immunotherapy treatment — a dendritic cell vaccine using patients’ own tumor followed by adoptive T cell therapy — triggers anti-tumor immune responses in these type of patients. Continue reading

New insights into conquering influenza

New insights into conquering influenza

Jan. 29, 2013 — Researchers from the University of Melbourne and The Walter and Eliza Hall Institute (WEHI) have discovered a new protein that protects against viral infections such as influenza. As influenza spreads through the northern hemisphere winter, Dr Linda Wakim and her colleagues in the Laboratory of Professor Jose Villadangos from the Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, and the Department of Microbiology and Immunology, believe they have a new clue to why some people fight infections better than others Continue reading

Altering eye cells may one day restore vision

Altering eye cells may one day restore vision

Jan. 25, 2013 — Doctors may one day treat some forms of blindness by altering the genetic program of the light-sensing cells of the eye, according to scientists at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis. Continue reading

Estrogen fights urinary infection in mouse study

Estrogen fights urinary infection in mouse study

Jan. 23, 2013 — Estrogen levels drop dramatically in menopause, a time when the risk of urinary tract infections increases significantly. Continue reading

Estrogen fights urinary infection in mouse study

Estrogen fights urinary infection in mouse study

Jan. 23, 2013 — Estrogen levels drop dramatically in menopause, a time when the risk of urinary tract infections increases significantly. Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Continue reading