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Another muscular dystrophy mystery solved; Scientists inch closer to a therapy for patients

Another muscular dystrophy mystery solved; Scientists inch closer to a therapy for patients

ScienceDaily (Dec. 7, 2012) — Approximately 250,000 people in the United States suffer from muscular dystrophy, which occurs when damaged muscle tissue is replaced with fibrous, bony or fatty tissue and loses function Continue reading

Remote sensing, microbiology used to trace foodborne pathogens

Remote sensing, microbiology used to trace foodborne pathogens

ScienceDaily (Dec. Continue reading

Key events early in process of cellular aging defined

Key events early in process of cellular aging defined

ScienceDaily (Nov. 21, 2012) — For the first time, scientists at Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center have defined key events that take place early in the process of cellular aging. Together the discoveries, made through a series of experiments in yeast, bring unprecedented clarity to the complex cascade of events that comprise the aging process and pave the way to understanding how genetics and environmental factors like diet interact to influence lifespan, aging and age-related diseases such as cancer and neurodegenerative disorders Continue reading

Breakthrough nanoparticle halts multiple sclerosis, offers hope for other immune-related diseases

Breakthrough nanoparticle halts multiple sclerosis, offers hope for other immune-related diseases

ScienceDaily (Nov. Continue reading

Probiotic worm treatment may improve symptoms of colitis by restoring gut bacteria to healthy state

Probiotic worm treatment may improve symptoms of colitis by restoring gut bacteria to healthy state

ScienceDaily (Nov. 15, 2012) — A new study on monkeys with chronic diarrhea that were treated by microscopic parasite worm (helminth) eggs has provided insights on how this form of therapy may heal the intestine. This condition in monkeys is similar to the inflammatory bowel diseases that affects up to 1.4 million Americans. Continue reading

Cigarette smoke boosts virulence in Staphylococcus aureus

Cigarette smoke boosts virulence in Staphylococcus aureus

ScienceDaily (Nov. 8, 2012) — Exposure to cigarette smoke has long been associated with increased frequency of respiratory infections — which are harder to treat in smoke-exposed people than in those who lack such exposures. Now Ritwij Kulkarni of Columbia University, New York, NY, and colleagues show that cigarette smoke actually boosts virulence of Staphylococcus aureus bacteria. Continue reading

Norovirus disinfection: How much is enough?

Norovirus disinfection: How much is enough?

ScienceDaily (Nov. 8, 2012) — A variety of institutions and governments have developed “commonsense-based” disinfection guidelines to control norovirus contamination, but now, for the first time, a Dutch team has come up with science-based guidelines. The research is published in the November 2012 issue of the journal Applied and Environmental Microbiology . Continue reading

Antibiotics disrupt gut flora in infants: Recovery still incomplete after eight weeks

Antibiotics disrupt gut flora in infants: Recovery still incomplete after eight weeks

ScienceDaily (Nov. 8, 2012) — Eight weeks after antibiotic treatment of infants, the diversity of gastrointestinal flora remained diminished, although the number of individual bacteria was back to normal, according to a paper in the November 2012 issue of the journal Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy . Additionally, the potentially disease-causing Proteobacteria were now the dominant population in the treated infants Continue reading

When parasites catch viruses: Viral symbiont of a protozoan parasite increases virulence to human host

When parasites catch viruses: Viral symbiont of a protozoan parasite increases virulence to human host

ScienceDaily (Nov. 7, 2012) — When humans have parasites, the organisms live in our bodies, co-opt our resources and cause disease Continue reading

Unexpected bottleneck identified in spread of herpes simplex virus

Unexpected bottleneck identified in spread of herpes simplex virus

ScienceDaily (Nov. 5, 2012) — New research suggests that just one or two individual herpes virus particles attack a skin cell in the first stage of an outbreak, resulting in a bottleneck in which the infection may be vulnerable to medical treatment. Continue reading