List/Grid

Microbiology Subscribe to Microbiology

Compounds that control hemorrhagic viruses identified

Compounds that control hemorrhagic viruses identified

People fear diseases such as Ebola, Marburg, Lassa fever, rabies and HIV for good reason; they have high mortality rates and few, if any, possible treatments. Continue reading

Deadly human pathogen Cryptococcus fully sequenced

Deadly human pathogen Cryptococcus fully sequenced

Within each strand of DNA lies the blueprint for building an organism, along with the keys to its evolution and survival. These genetic instructions can give valuable insight into why pathogens like Cryptococcus neoformans — a fungus responsible for a million cases of pneumonia and meningitis every year — are so malleable and dangerous Continue reading

Scientists re-define what’s healthy in newest analysis for human microbiome project

Scientists re-define what’s healthy in newest analysis for human microbiome project

As scientists catalog the trillions of bacteria found in every nook and cranny of the human body, a new look by the University of Michigan shows wide variation in the types of bacteria found in healthy people. Continue reading

Antimicrobial from soaps promotes bacteria buildup in human noses

Antimicrobial from soaps promotes bacteria buildup in human noses

An antimicrobial agent found in common household soaps, shampoos and toothpastes may be finding its way inside human noses where it promotes the colonization of Staphylococcus aureus bacteria and could predispose some people to infection. Researchers at the University of Michigan report their findings this week in a study published in mBio ®, the online open-access journal of the American Society for Microbiology. Triclosan, a human-made compound used in a range of antibacterial personal care products such as soaps, toothpastes, kitchen surfaces, clothes and medical equipment, was found in nasal passages of 41% of adults sampled. Continue reading

Antimicrobial from soaps promotes bacteria buildup in human noses

Antimicrobial from soaps promotes bacteria buildup in human noses

An antimicrobial agent found in common household soaps, shampoos and toothpastes may be finding its way inside human noses where it promotes the colonization of Staphylococcus aureus bacteria and could predispose some people to infection. Researchers at the University of Michigan report their findings this week in a study published in mBio ®, the online open-access journal of the American Society for Microbiology. Continue reading

Disruption of VISTA plays an important role in regulating immune response

Disruption of VISTA plays an important role in regulating immune response

Date: April 7, 2014 Source: Norris Cotton Cancer CenterDartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center Summary: The body’s immune system response was enhanced in a study when researchers disrupted VISTA, a protein that prevents the immune system from overreacting. Understanding how checkpoint regulators like VISTA function is important to cancer researchers, who hope to use the immune system to attack tumors. Researchers at the Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth have found that the body’s immune system response was enhanced when they disrupted VISTA, a protein that prevents the immune system from overreacting Continue reading

Disruption of VISTA plays an important role in regulating immune response

Disruption of VISTA plays an important role in regulating immune response

Date: April 7, 2014 Source: Norris Cotton Cancer CenterDartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center Summary: The body’s immune system response was enhanced in a study when researchers disrupted VISTA, a protein that prevents the immune system from overreacting. Understanding how checkpoint regulators like VISTA function is important to cancer researchers, who hope to use the immune system to attack tumors. Continue reading

Chronic sleep disturbance could trigger onset of Alzheimer’s

Chronic sleep disturbance could trigger onset of Alzheimer’s

People who experience chronic sleep disturbance — either through their work, insomnia or other reasons — could face an earlier onset of dementia and Alzheimer’s, according to a new pre-clinical study by researchers at Temple University. “The big biological question that we tried to address in this study is whether sleep disturbance is a risk factor to develop Alzheimer’s or is it something that manifests with the disease,” said Domenico Praticò, professor of pharmacology and microbiology/immunology in Temple’s School of Medicine, who led the study. Initially, the researchers looked at longitudinal studies which indicated that people who reported chronic sleep disturbances often developed Alzheimer’s disease Continue reading

Protein common in cancers jumps anti-tumor mechanisms

Protein common in cancers jumps anti-tumor mechanisms

A Stony Brook University-led international team of infectious disease researchers have discovered how a cellular protein, called STAT3, which is overactive in a majority of human cancers, interferes with an antitumor mechanism in cells and therefore promotes the growth of cancer. The findings, to be published this week in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences ( PNAS ) add to the understanding of cancer development and provide a basis for potentially new targeted methods to prevent and treat cancer. In the paper, titled “STAT3 interrupts ATR-Chk1 signaling to allow oncovirus-mediated cell proliferation,” lead author Sumita Bhaduri-McIntosh, MD, PhD, and colleagues made their discovery by using the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) as a tool to probe fundamental cancer development-related questions. Continue reading

Bacterium, fungus team up to cause virulent tooth decay in toddlers

Bacterium, fungus team up to cause virulent tooth decay in toddlers

Early childhood caries, a highly aggressive and painful form of tooth decay that frequently occurs in preschool children, especially from backgrounds of poverty, may result from a nefarious partnership between a bacterium and a fungus, according to a paper published ahead of print in the journal Infection and Immunity . The resulting tooth decay can be so severe that treatment frequently requires surgery — in the operating room, says corresponding author Hyun (Michel) Koo of the University of Pennsylvania. Continue reading