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Tumor-suppressor connects with histone protein to hinder gene expression

Tumor-suppressor connects with histone protein to hinder gene expression

A tumor-suppressing protein acts as a dimmer switch to dial down gene expression. It does this by reading a chemical message attached to another protein that’s tightly intertwined with DNA, a team led by scientists at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center reported at the AACR Annual Meeting 2014. The findings, also published in the journal Nature on April 10, provide evidence in support of the “histone code” hypothesis Continue reading

Tumor-suppressor connects with histone protein to hinder gene expression

Tumor-suppressor connects with histone protein to hinder gene expression

A tumor-suppressing protein acts as a dimmer switch to dial down gene expression. It does this by reading a chemical message attached to another protein that’s tightly intertwined with DNA, a team led by scientists at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center reported at the AACR Annual Meeting 2014. The findings, also published in the journal Nature on April 10, provide evidence in support of the “histone code” hypothesis. Continue reading

Mechanism that regulates lung function in disease Birt-Hogg-Dube syndrome found

Mechanism that regulates lung function in disease Birt-Hogg-Dube syndrome found

Researchers at Penn Medicine have discovered that the tumor suppressor gene folliculin (FLCN) is essential to normal lung function in patients with the rare disease Birt-Hogg-Dube (BHD) syndrome, a genetic disorder that affects the lungs, skin and kidneys. Continue reading

Transcription factors distinguishing glioblastoma stem cells identified

Transcription factors distinguishing glioblastoma stem cells identified

The activity of four transcription factors — proteins that regulate the expression of other genes — appears to distinguish the small proportion of glioblastoma cells responsible for the aggressiveness and treatment resistance of the deadly brain tumor. The findings by a team of Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) investigators, which will be published in the April 24 issue of Cell and are receiving advance online release, support the importance of epigenetics — processes controlling whether or not genes are expressed — in cancer pathology and identify molecular circuits that may be targeted by new therapeutic approaches. Continue reading

How mechanical forces affect T-cell recognition, signaling

How mechanical forces affect T-cell recognition, signaling

T-cells are the body’s sentinels, patrolling every corner of the body in search of foreign threats such as bacteria and viruses. Continue reading

How mechanical forces affect T-cell recognition, signaling

How mechanical forces affect T-cell recognition, signaling

T-cells are the body’s sentinels, patrolling every corner of the body in search of foreign threats such as bacteria and viruses. Receptor molecules on the T-cells identify invaders by recognizing their specific antigens, helping the T-cells discriminate attackers from the body’s own cells. Continue reading

Microgravity research helping to understand the fungi within

Microgravity research helping to understand the fungi within

You may not recognize it by name, but if you have ever had a child with a diaper rash, that child was likely a host to Candida albicans ( C. albicans ) Continue reading

Chips with olestra cause body toxins to dip, study finds

Chips with olestra cause body toxins to dip, study finds

According to a clinical trial led by University of Cincinnati researchers, a snack food ingredient called olestra has been found to speed up the removal of toxins in the body. Results are reported in the April edition of the Journal of Nutritional Biochemistry. The trial demonstrated that olestra — a zero-calorie fat substitute found in low-calorie snack foods such as Pringles — could reduce the levels of serum polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in people who had been exposed to PCBs. Continue reading

Bad penny: Cancer’s thirst for copper can be targeted

Bad penny: Cancer’s thirst for copper can be targeted

Drugs used to block copper absorption for a rare genetic condition may find an additional use as a treatment for certain types of cancer, researchers at Duke Medicine report. The researchers found that cancers with a mutation in the BRAF gene require copper to promote tumor growth. These tumors include melanoma, the most dangerous form of skin cancer that kills an estimated 10,000 people in the United States a year, according to the National Cancer Institute. Continue reading