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Each day in hospital raises risk of multidrug-resistant infection

Each day in hospital raises risk of multidrug-resistant infection

If a patient contracts an infection while in the hospital, each day of hospitalization increases by 1% the likelihood that the infection will be multidrug-resistant, according to research presented at the 54th Interscience Conference on Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy (ICAAC) an infectious disease meeting of the American Society for Microbiology. Researchers from the Medical University of South Carolina gathered and analyzed historical data from 949 documented cases of Gram-negative infection at their academic medical center Continue reading

New antifungal as effective as existing drugs with fewer adverse events

New antifungal as effective as existing drugs with fewer adverse events

A newly developed antifungal, isavuconazole, is as effective as an existing drug, voriconazole, against invasive mold disease in cancer patients with less adverse effects, according to phase 3 clinical data presented at the 54th Interscience Conference on Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy, an infectious disease meeting of the American Society for Microbiology. Continue reading

Platelet-like particles augment natural blood clotting for treating trauma

Platelet-like particles augment natural blood clotting for treating trauma

A new class of synthetic platelet-like particles could augment natural blood clotting for the emergency treatment of traumatic injuries — and potentially offer doctors a new option for curbing surgical bleeding and addressing certain blood clotting disorders without the need for transfusions of natural platelets. The clotting particles, which are based on soft and deformable hydrogel materials, are triggered by the same factor that initiates the body’s own clotting processes Continue reading

Dynamic duo takes out cellular trash: Research finds how dead cells are removed from body

Dynamic duo takes out cellular trash: Research finds how dead cells are removed from body

In most of the tissues of the body, specialized immune cells are entrusted with the task of engulfing the billions of dead cells that are generated every day. When these garbage disposals don’t do their job, dead cells and their waste products rapidly pile up, destroying healthy tissue and leading to autoimmune diseases such as lupus and rheumatoid arthritis. Continue reading

Disease in a dish approach could aid Huntington’s disease discovery

Disease in a dish approach could aid Huntington’s disease discovery

Creating induced pluripotent stem cells or iPS cells allows researchers to establish “disease in a dish” models of conditions ranging from Alzheimer’s disease to diabetes. Scientists at Yerkes National Primate Research Center, Emory University have now applied the technology to a model of Huntington’s disease (HD) in transgenic nonhuman primates, allowing them to conveniently assess the efficacy of potential therapies on neuronal cells in the laboratory. Continue reading

Banked blood grows stiffer with age, study finds

Banked blood grows stiffer with age, study finds

It may look like fresh blood and flow like fresh blood, but the longer blood is stored, the less it can carry oxygen into the tiny microcapillaries of the body, says a new study from University of Illinois researchers. Using advanced optical techniques, the researchers measured the stiffness of the membrane surrounding red blood cells over time Continue reading

New gene mutations for Wilms tumor found

New gene mutations for Wilms tumor found

Researchers at UT Southwestern Medical Center and the Gill Center for Cancer and Blood Disorders at Children’s Medical Center, Dallas, have made significant progress in defining new genetic causes of Wilms tumor, a type of kidney cancer found only in children. Wilms tumor is the most common childhood genitourinary tract cancer and the third most common solid tumor of childhood Continue reading

Rare stem cells hold potential for infertility treatments

Rare stem cells hold potential for infertility treatments

Rare stem cells in testis that produce a biomarker protein called PAX7 help give rise to new sperm cells — and may hold a key to restoring fertility, research by scientists at UT Southwestern Medical Center suggests. Continue reading

The yin and yang of overcoming cocaine addiction

The yin and yang of overcoming cocaine addiction

Yaoying Ma says that biology, by nature, has a yin and a yang — a push and a pull. Addiction, particularly relapse, she finds, is no exception Continue reading

Knowing how bacteria take out trash could lead to new antibiotics

Knowing how bacteria take out trash could lead to new antibiotics

A collaborative team of scientists including biochemist Peter Chien at the University of Massachusetts Amherst has reconstructed how bacteria tightly control their growth and division, a process known as the cell cycle, by specifically destroying key proteins through regulated protein degradation. Regulated protein degradation uses specific enzymes called energy dependent proteases to selective destroy certain targets. Because regulated protein degradation is critical for bacterial virulence and invasion, understanding how these proteases function should help to uncover pathways that can be targeted by new antibiotics Continue reading