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Discovery yields master regulator of toxin production in staph infections

Discovery yields master regulator of toxin production in staph infections

St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital scientists have discovered an enzyme that regulates production of the toxins that contribute to potentially life-threatening Staphylococcus aureus infections. The study recently appeared in the scientific journal the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences ( PNAS ). Continue reading

Discovery yields master regulator of toxin production in staph infections

Discovery yields master regulator of toxin production in staph infections

St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital scientists have discovered an enzyme that regulates production of the toxins that contribute to potentially life-threatening Staphylococcus aureus infections. The study recently appeared in the scientific journal the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences ( PNAS ). Continue reading

Drug reverses brain deficits of Alzheimer’s in animal model

Drug reverses brain deficits of Alzheimer’s in animal model

Researchers at Yale School of Medicine have discovered a new drug compound that reverses the brain deficits of Alzheimer’s disease in an animal model. Their findings are published in the Aug. 5 issue of the journal PLoS Biology . Continue reading

‘Treatments waiting to be discovered’ inside new database

‘Treatments waiting to be discovered’ inside new database

Your genes are blueprints for proteins, and molecules called microRNA can help to determine how often these genetic blueprints are manufactured into proteins. Researchers often ask what microRNA regulates a gene related to disease. Or what gene is regulated by a microRNA found in sick patients Continue reading

New clues to repairing an injured spinal cord

New clues to repairing an injured spinal cord

Frogs, dogs, whales, snails can all do it, but humans and primates can’t. Regrow nerves after an injury, that is — while many animals have this ability, humans don’t Continue reading

Butterflies could hold key to probes that repair genes

Butterflies could hold key to probes that repair genes

New discoveries about how butterflies feed could help engineers develop tiny probes that siphon liquid out of single cells for a wide range of medical tests and treatments, according to Clemson University researchers. The National Science Foundation recently awarded the project $696,514 Continue reading

Grizzly research offers surprising insights into diabetes-obesity link

Grizzly research offers surprising insights into diabetes-obesity link

While diabetes rates are on the rise and are having serious effects on millions of people’s health, researchers studying grizzly bears have now discovered a natural state of diabetes that serves a real biological purpose and is also reversible. Investigators reporting in the August 5 issue of the Cell Press journal Cell Metabolism note that grizzly bears are obese but not diabetic in the fall, become diabetic only weeks later in hibernation, and then somehow become “cured” of diabetes when they wake up in the spring. The research reveals how natural biology, through evolutionary experimentation, can teach us new things about how animals naturally cope with conditions that would cause disease in humans. Continue reading

An embryonic cell’s fate sealed by speed of a signal

An embryonic cell’s fate sealed by speed of a signal

When embryonic cells get the signal to specialize the call can come quickly. Continue reading

Warning to parents on high acidity drinks

Warning to parents on high acidity drinks

Dental researchers at the University of Adelaide are warning parents of the dangers of soft drinks, fruit juice, sports drinks and other drinks high in acidity, which form part of a “triple-threat” of permanent damage to young people’s teeth. Continue reading

Warning to parents on high acidity drinks

Warning to parents on high acidity drinks

Dental researchers at the University of Adelaide are warning parents of the dangers of soft drinks, fruit juice, sports drinks and other drinks high in acidity, which form part of a “triple-threat” of permanent damage to young people’s teeth. For the first time, researchers have been able to demonstrate that lifelong damage is caused by acidity to the teeth within the first 30 seconds of acid attack. The researchers say drinks high in acidity combined with night-time tooth grinding and reflux can cause major, irreversible damage to young people’s teeth Continue reading