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Novel protein fragments may protect against Alzheimer’s

Novel protein fragments may protect against Alzheimer’s

The devastating loss of memory and consciousness in Alzheimer’s disease is caused by plaque accumulations and tangles in neurons, which kill brain cells. Alzheimer’s research has centered on trying to understand the pathology as well as the potential protective or regenerative properties of brain cells as an avenue for treating the widespread disease. Continue reading

Cause of many preterm births discovered: Premature aging of placenta from oxidative stress

Cause of many preterm births discovered: Premature aging of placenta from oxidative stress

A new study by researchers at the University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston is the first to show that premature aging of the placenta due to oxidative stress is the cause of many preterm births. The study appears today in the American Journal of Pathology. Continue reading

Association between small-vessel disease, Alzheimer pathology studied

Association between small-vessel disease, Alzheimer pathology studied

Cerebral small-vessel disease (SVD) and Alzheimer disease (AD) pathology appear to be associated. Continue reading

Genetic blueprint for cancerous appendix tumors identified

Genetic blueprint for cancerous appendix tumors identified

Using next generation DNA sequencing, Dartmouth scientists have identified potentially actionable mutations in cancers of the appendix. Continue reading

Mobilizing immune system against viruses: New way found

Mobilizing immune system against viruses: New way found

University of British Columbia scientists have uncovered an intricate chain reaction in the body’s immune system and have used the knowledge to develop a new treatment against harmful viruses. Viral pandemics, such as the coronavirus that caused the deadly SARS outbreak in 2002, have caused hundreds of deaths in Canada, yet effective anti-viral drugs are rare. A key element to this natural immune response is an antiviral protein in the blood called Interferon alpha. Continue reading

IL-27 balances the immune response to influenza and reduces lung damage

IL-27 balances the immune response to influenza and reduces lung damage

Highly pathogenic (dangerous) influenza strains elicit a strong immune response which can lead to uncontrolled inflammation in the lung and potentially fatal lung injury. A study published on May 8th in PLOS Pathogens demonstrates the importance of IL-27 for the control of immunopathology — damage to the lung tissue caused by the immune system — and the therapeutic potential of well-timed IL-27 application to treat life-threatening inflammation during lung infection Continue reading

IL-27 balances the immune response to influenza and reduces lung damage

IL-27 balances the immune response to influenza and reduces lung damage

Highly pathogenic (dangerous) influenza strains elicit a strong immune response which can lead to uncontrolled inflammation in the lung and potentially fatal lung injury. Continue reading

Population screening for sudden cardiac death in young people: Feasible with basic program

Population screening for sudden cardiac death in young people: Feasible with basic program

Despite fears over cost, the wide-scale screening of young people to detect risk of sudden cardiac death (SCD) is feasible and cost effective, according to a study presented at EuroPRevent 2014.(1) More than 12,000 people aged between 14 and 35 were screened at a cost of £35 (40 euro) each; rates of subsequent referral for further investigation were low and considered of “a relative low additional cost” to health services. The study was reported at the EuroPRevent congress 2014 in Amsterdam by Dr Rajay Narain, Clinical Research Fellow from the Department of Cardiovascular Sciences, St George’s University of London (and Cardiac Risk in the Young Heart Screening Charity), UK. As background to the study Dr Narain explained that the most publicized cases of SCD in young people occur in elite sports players and athletes. Continue reading

Dementia diagnosis twice as likely if older adult has schizophrenia; Cancer less likely

Dementia diagnosis twice as likely if older adult has schizophrenia; Cancer less likely

Researchers from Regenstrief Institute and Indiana University who followed over 30,000 older adults for a decade have found the rate of dementia diagnosis for patients with schizophrenia to be twice as high as for patients without this chronic, severe and disabling brain disorder. Continue reading

Exploring genetics behind Alzheimer’s resiliency

Exploring genetics behind Alzheimer’s resiliency

Autopsies have revealed that some individuals develop the cellular changes indicative of Alzheimer’s disease without ever showing clinical symptoms in their lifetime. Continue reading