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Physicists sound warning to ‘nail beauty fanatics’

Physicists sound warning to ‘nail beauty fanatics’

The daily trimming of fingernails and toenails to make them more aesthetically pleasing could be detrimental and potentially lead to serious nail conditions. This is according to researchers at the University of Nottingham who have devised equations to identify the physical laws that govern nail growth, and used them to throw light on the causes of some of the most common nail problems, such as ingrown toe nails, spoon-shaped nails and pincer nails Continue reading

Breakthrough allows researchers to watch molecules

Breakthrough allows researchers to watch molecules

A new crystallographic technique developed at the University of Leeds is set to transform scientists’ ability to observe how molecules work. Continue reading

Second-line afatinib significantly improves progression-free survival in recurrent or metastatic head and neck cancer, phase III trial shows

Second-line afatinib significantly improves progression-free survival in recurrent or metastatic head and neck cancer, phase III trial shows

The tyrosine kinase inhibitor afatinib significantly improved progression-free survival compared to methotrexate in patients with recurrent or metastatic squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck after failure of platinum-based chemotherapy, the results of a phase III trial show. Continue reading

Mimicking natural evolution with ‘promiscuous reactions’ to improve the diversity of drugs

Mimicking natural evolution with ‘promiscuous reactions’ to improve the diversity of drugs

The researchers, who report their findings online in the journal Nature Chemistry , took their inspiration from evolution in nature. The research may uncover new pharmaceutical drugs that traditional methods would never have found. “Nature produces some amazing structures with really interesting biological activity, but the plant or animal did not design them. Continue reading

Young women with polycystic ovary syndrome are 5 times more likely to develop type 2 diabetes

Young women with polycystic ovary syndrome are 5 times more likely to develop type 2 diabetes

A leading expert on reproductive health says young women with Polycystic Ovary Syndrome (PCOS) have a startlingly higher risk of developing type 2 diabetes, even if young and not overweight. The research led by Professor Helena Teede and Dr Anju Joham, from the School of Public Health and Preventive Medicine at Monash University analysed a large-scale epidemiological study, called the Australian Longitudinal Study of Women’s Health, which revealed the findings. Over 6000 women aged between 25-28 years were monitored for nine years, including 500 with diagnosed PCOS Continue reading

Embryonic stem cells offer new treatment for multiple sclerosis

Embryonic stem cells offer new treatment for multiple sclerosis

Scientists in the University of Connecticut’s Technology Incubation Program have identified a novel approach to treating multiple sclerosis (MS) using human embryonic stem cells, offering a promising new therapy for more than 2.3 million people suffering from the debilitating disease. Continue reading

Embryonic stem cells offer new treatment for multiple sclerosis

Embryonic stem cells offer new treatment for multiple sclerosis

Scientists in the University of Connecticut’s Technology Incubation Program have identified a novel approach to treating multiple sclerosis (MS) using human embryonic stem cells, offering a promising new therapy for more than 2.3 million people suffering from the debilitating disease. The researchers demonstrated that the embryonic stem cell therapy significantly reduced MS disease severity in animal models, and offered better treatment results than stem cells derived from human adult bone marrow. Continue reading

Quest for long-lasting blood: Scientists developing one-size-fits-all artifical blood

Quest for long-lasting blood: Scientists developing one-size-fits-all artifical blood

A team of scientists at the University of Essex are hoping to develop a one-size-fits-all, third generation artificial blood substitute. Every day thousands of people around the world have their lives saved or improved thanks to someone giving blood. But imagine how many more lives could be saved if a long-lasting blood substitute could be found, which could easily be stored at room temperature and available to all patients, regardless of their blood type Continue reading

Broader definition of successful aging explored by researchers

Broader definition of successful aging explored by researchers

An aging population poses challenges for governments around the globe as nations grapple with how to satisfy the physical, social and economic needs of older adults. Continue reading

Cheap and easy technique to snip DNA could revolutionize gene therapy

Cheap and easy technique to snip DNA could revolutionize gene therapy

Jan. 7, 2013 — A simple, precise and inexpensive method for cutting DNA to insert genes into human cells could transform genetic medicine, making routine what now are expensive, complicated and rare procedures for replacing defective genes in order to fix genetic disease or even cure AIDS. Discovered last year by Jennifer Doudna and Martin Jinek of the Howard Hughes Medical Institute and University of California, Berkeley, and Emmanuelle Charpentier of the Laboratory for Molecular Infection Medicine-Sweden, the technique was labeled a “tour de force” in a 2012 review in the journal Nature Biotechnology Continue reading