List/Grid

Clinical Sciences Books Subscribe to Clinical Sciences Books

Fertility preservation option for young boys with cancer

Fertility preservation option for young boys with cancer

Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center is one of a few centers in the world — and the only one in North Carolina — offering young boys with cancer the opportunity to participate in a research study focused on fertility preservation and restoration. The research, conducted by the Medical Center’s Wake Forest Institute for Regenerative Medicine (WFIRM) under the direction of Anthony Atala, M.D., institute director, gives boys who have a high risk of becoming sterile the option to “bank” a small piece of testicular tissue prior to treatment. Continue reading

ZEB1: Oscar for leading role in fat storage

ZEB1: Oscar for leading role in fat storage

A team from EPFL, in collaboration with ETH Zurich, has managed to decode the process of adipogenesis by identifying the precise proteins that play the leading roles in fat absorption. Their findings have been published in the open-access scientific journal eLife Continue reading

Paint on ‘smart’ bandage emits phosphorescent glow for healing below

Paint on ‘smart’ bandage emits phosphorescent glow for healing below

Inspired by a desire to help wounded soldiers, an international, multidisciplinary team of researchers led by Assistant Professor Conor L. Evans at the Wellman Center for Photomedicine of Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) and Harvard Medical School (HMS) has created a paint-on, see-through, “smart” bandage that glows to indicate a wound’s tissue oxygenation concentration Continue reading

A heartbeat away? Hybrid ‘patch’ could replace transplants

A heartbeat away? Hybrid ‘patch’ could replace transplants

Because heart cells cannot multiply and cardiac muscles contain few stem cells, heart tissue is unable to repair itself after a heart attack. Now Tel Aviv University researchers are literally setting a new gold standard in cardiac tissue engineering Continue reading

Synthetic sperm protein raises the chance for successful in vitro fertilization

Synthetic sperm protein raises the chance for successful in vitro fertilization

Having trouble getting pregnant — even with IVF? Continue reading

Spastic paraplegia: New light shed on cause

Spastic paraplegia: New light shed on cause

Scientists at The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) have discovered that a gene mutation linked to hereditary spastic paraplegia, a disabling neurological disorder, interferes with the normal breakdown of triglyceride fat molecules in the brain. The TSRI researchers found large droplets of triglycerides within the neurons of mice modeling the disease. The findings, reported this week online ahead of print by the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences , point the way to potential therapies and showcase an investigative strategy that should be useful in determining the biochemical causes of other genetic illnesses. Continue reading

Ancient human genome from southern Africa throws light on our origins

Ancient human genome from southern Africa throws light on our origins

The skeleton of a man who lived 2,330 years ago in the southernmost tip of Africa tells us about ourselves as humans, and throws some light on our earliest common genetic ancestry. Continue reading

Early sign of pancreatic cancer identified by researchers

Early sign of pancreatic cancer identified by researchers

Scientists at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and other institutions have discovered a sign of the early development of pancreatic cancer – an upsurge in certain amino acids that occurs before the disease is diagnosed and symptoms appear. The research is being published online today by the journal Nature Medicine . Although the increase isn’t large enough to be the basis of a new test for early detection of the disease, the findings will help researchers better understand how pancreatic cancer affects the rest of the body, particularly how it can trigger the sometimes deadly muscle-wasting disease known as cachexia. Continue reading

Early sign of pancreatic cancer identified by researchers

Early sign of pancreatic cancer identified by researchers

Scientists at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and other institutions have discovered a sign of the early development of pancreatic cancer – an upsurge in certain amino acids that occurs before the disease is diagnosed and symptoms appear. The research is being published online today by the journal Nature Medicine . Although the increase isn’t large enough to be the basis of a new test for early detection of the disease, the findings will help researchers better understand how pancreatic cancer affects the rest of the body, particularly how it can trigger the sometimes deadly muscle-wasting disease known as cachexia. Continue reading

Crizotinib treatment effective against ROS1-positive lung cancer, study suggests

Crizotinib treatment effective against ROS1-positive lung cancer, study suggests

Treatment with the targeted therapy drug crizotinib effectively halts the growth of lung tumors driven by rearrangements of the ROS1 gene. In an article receiving Online First publication in the New England Journal of Medicine to coincide with a presentation at the European Society for Medical Oncology meeting, an international research team reports that crizotinib treatment led to significant tumor shrinkage in 36 of 50 study participants and suppressed tumor growth in another 9 Continue reading