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Smoking interferes with neurocognitive recovery during abstinence from alcohol

Smoking interferes with neurocognitive recovery during abstinence from alcohol

Numerous studies have shown that individuals with an alcohol use disorder perform worse than those without one on multiple neurocognitive domains of function following detoxification from alcohol, although the level of impairment can vary widely among individuals. A new study of the degree of neurocognitive recovery in treatment-seeking alcohol dependent individuals (ALC) — with varied degrees of smoking status — during the first eight months of sustained abstinence from alcohol has found that smoking status influenced the rate and level of recovery Continue reading

Smoking interferes with neurocognitive recovery during abstinence from alcohol

Smoking interferes with neurocognitive recovery during abstinence from alcohol

Numerous studies have shown that individuals with an alcohol use disorder perform worse than those without one on multiple neurocognitive domains of function following detoxification from alcohol, although the level of impairment can vary widely among individuals. A new study of the degree of neurocognitive recovery in treatment-seeking alcohol dependent individuals (ALC) — with varied degrees of smoking status — during the first eight months of sustained abstinence from alcohol has found that smoking status influenced the rate and level of recovery Continue reading

Bogus recycling bins help identify drinking patterns among low-income seniors

Bogus recycling bins help identify drinking patterns among low-income seniors

Substance abuse is the fastest growing health concern for older adults, a segment of the population that is likewise rapidly increasing. Continue reading

Fight against Alzheimer’s disease: New research on walnuts

Fight against Alzheimer’s disease: New research on walnuts

A new animal study published in the Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease indicates that a diet including walnuts may have a beneficial effect in reducing the risk, delaying the onset, slowing the progression of, or preventing Alzheimer’s disease. Research led by Abha Chauhan, PhD, head of the Developmental Neuroscience Laboratory at the New York State Institute for Basic Research in Developmental Disabilities (IBR), found significant improvement in learning skills, memory, reducing anxiety, and motor development in mice fed a walnut-enriched diet Continue reading

Siblings of children with autism can show signs at 18 months

Siblings of children with autism can show signs at 18 months

About 20% of younger siblings of children with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) will develop the condition by age 3. A new study by Yale School of Medicine researchers has found that 57% of these younger siblings who later develop the condition already showed symptoms at age 18 months. Published in the October Journal of the American Academy of Child & Adolescent Psychiatry , this is the first large-scale, multi-site study aimed at identifying specific social-communicative behaviors that distinguish infants with ASD from their typically and atypically developing high-risk peers as early as 18 months of age Continue reading

Patients treated with radiation therapy who have tumors in left breast have comparable overall survival to those with tumors in right breast

Patients treated with radiation therapy who have tumors in left breast have comparable overall survival to those with tumors in right breast

Tumor laterality (left-side vs. right-side) does not impact overall survival in breast cancer patients treated with breast-conserving surgery and adjuvant external beam radiation therapy, according to a study published in the October 1, 2014 issue of the International Journal of Radiation Oncology • Biology • Physics (Red Journal), the official scientific journal of the American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO). Studies have shown that breast cancer patients treated with radiation therapy have improved local-regional recurrence, and breast cancer-specific survival after breast-conserving surgery and overall survival (OS) after mastectomy Continue reading

Tear duct implant effective at reducing pain, inflammation in cataract surgery patients

Tear duct implant effective at reducing pain, inflammation in cataract surgery patients

The first tear duct implant developed to treat inflammation and pain following cataract surgery has been shown to be a reliable alternative to medicated eye drops, which are the current standard of care, according to a study presented  at AAO 2014, the 118th annual meeting of the American Academy of Ophthalmology. The device, known as a punctum plug, automatically delivers the correct amount of postoperative medication in patients, potentially solving the issue of poor compliance with self-administering eye drops. After cataract surgery, most patients are prescribed topical eye drops to reduce ocular inflammation that often occurs after surgery, but many do not or are not able to comply with the recommended dosing regimen. Continue reading

‘Mega’ cells control growth of blood-producing cells

‘Mega’ cells control growth of blood-producing cells

While megakaryocytes are best known for producing platelets that heal wounds, these “mega” cells found in bone marrow also play a critical role in regulating stem cells according to new research from the Stowers Institute for Medical Research. In fact, hematopoietic stem cells differentiate to generate megakaryocytes in bone marrow. The Stowers study is the first to show that hematopoietic stem cells (the parent cells) can be directly controlled by their own progeny (megakaryocytes). Continue reading

Research reveals likelihood, onset of multiple sclerosis diagnosis among patients with inflammatory eye disease

Research reveals likelihood, onset of multiple sclerosis diagnosis among patients with inflammatory eye disease

The results of the largest retrospective study of multiple sclerosis (MS) in uveitis patients has revealed that nearly 60 percent of patients with both diseases were diagnosed with each within a five-year span. Continue reading

New test scans all genes simultaneously to identify single mutation causing child’s rare genetic disease

New test scans all genes simultaneously to identify single mutation causing child’s rare genetic disease

Audrey Lapidus adored her baby’s sunny smile and irresistible dimples, but grew worried when Calvin did not roll over or crawl by 10 months and suffered chronic digestive problems. Four neurologists dismissed his symptoms and a battery of tests proved inconclusive. Desperate for answers, Audrey and her husband agreed to have their son become UCLA’s first patient to undergo a powerful new test called exome sequencing. Continue reading