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Inhibitor causing male pattern baldness and target for hair-loss treatments identified

Inhibitor causing male pattern baldness and target for hair-loss treatments identified

ScienceDaily (Mar. 21, 2012) — Researchers from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania have identified an abnormal amount a protein called Prostaglandin D2 in the bald scalp of men with male pattern baldness, a discovery that may lead directly to new treatments for the most common cause of hair loss in men. Continue reading

Novel bioactive peptides promote wound healing in vivo

Novel bioactive peptides promote wound healing in vivo

ScienceDaily (Feb. 24, 2012) — Researchers have combined bioactive peptides to successfully stimulate wound healing. The in vitro and in vivo study, published February 24 in PLoS ONE , demonstrates that the combination of two peptides stimulates the growth of blood vessels and promotes re-growth of tissue Continue reading

Researcher’s photoacoustic device finds cancer cells before they become tumors, study suggests

Researcher’s photoacoustic device finds cancer cells before they become tumors, study suggests

ScienceDaily (Jan. 5, 2012) — Early detection of melanoma, the most aggressive skin cancer, is critical because melanoma will spread rapidly throughout the body. Now, University of Missouri researchers are one step closer to melanoma cancer detection at the cellular level, long before tumors have a chance to form Continue reading

Smoking is strongly associated with squamous cell carcinoma among women

Smoking is strongly associated with squamous cell carcinoma among women

ScienceDaily (Dec. 8, 2011) — Women who have non-melanoma skin cancers are more likely to have smoked cigarettes compared to women without skin cancer, said researchers at Moffitt Cancer Center in Tampa, Fla., who published study results in a recent issue of Cancer Causes Control . The study investigated the relationship between cigarette smoking and non-melanoma skin cancers, including basal cell carcinoma (BCC) and squamous cell carcinomas (SCC) Continue reading

Lower antioxidant level might explain higher skin-cancer rate in males

Lower antioxidant level might explain higher skin-cancer rate in males

ScienceDaily (Dec. Continue reading

P-Rex1 protein key to melanoma metastasis

P-Rex1 protein key to melanoma metastasis

ScienceDaily (Nov. 22, 2011) — Researchers from UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center are part of a team that has identified a protein, called P-Rex1, that is key to the movement of cells called melanoblasts. When these cells experience uncontrolled growth, melanoma develops. Continue reading

Lab-made skin cells will aid transplantation, cancer, drug discovery research, say scientists

Lab-made skin cells will aid transplantation, cancer, drug discovery research, say scientists

ScienceDaily (Oct. 26, 2011) — The pigmented cells called melanocytes aren’t just for making freckles and tans. Melanocytes absorb ultraviolet light, protecting the skin from the harmful effects of the sun. Continue reading

Survey of hair professionals finds that some report looking for skin cancer lesions on customers’ scalp, neck and face

Survey of hair professionals finds that some report looking for skin cancer lesions on customers’ scalp, neck and face

ScienceDaily (Oct. 17, 2011) — In a survey of hair professionals, some reported that they look at customers’ face, scalp and neck for suspicious skin lesions, according to a report in the October issue of Archives of Dermatology , one of the JAMA/Archives journals Continue reading

Vitamin D crucial in human immune response to tuberculosis, scientists find

Vitamin D crucial in human immune response to tuberculosis, scientists find

ScienceDaily (Oct. 12, 2011) — Vitamin D is not just important for building strong bones — it also plays an essential role in the body’s fight against infections such as tuberculosis, an international research team including UCLA scientists has found. Tuberculosis, a potentially fatal lung disease, causes an estimated 1.8 million deaths annually, according to the World Health Organization, and it especially impacts those with reduced immunity, such as HIV-infected individuals. Continue reading

Vitamin D crucial in human immune response to tuberculosis, scientists find

Vitamin D crucial in human immune response to tuberculosis, scientists find

ScienceDaily (Oct. 12, 2011) — Vitamin D is not just important for building strong bones — it also plays an essential role in the body’s fight against infections such as tuberculosis, an international research team including UCLA scientists has found. Tuberculosis, a potentially fatal lung disease, causes an estimated 1.8 million deaths annually, according to the World Health Organization, and it especially impacts those with reduced immunity, such as HIV-infected individuals. Continue reading