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Smoking is strongly associated with squamous cell carcinoma among women

Smoking is strongly associated with squamous cell carcinoma among women

ScienceDaily (Dec. 8, 2011) — Women who have non-melanoma skin cancers are more likely to have smoked cigarettes compared to women without skin cancer, said researchers at Moffitt Cancer Center in Tampa, Fla., who published study results in a recent issue of Cancer Causes Control . The study investigated the relationship between cigarette smoking and non-melanoma skin cancers, including basal cell carcinoma (BCC) and squamous cell carcinomas (SCC) Continue reading

Lower antioxidant level might explain higher skin-cancer rate in males

Lower antioxidant level might explain higher skin-cancer rate in males

ScienceDaily (Dec. Continue reading

P-Rex1 protein key to melanoma metastasis

P-Rex1 protein key to melanoma metastasis

ScienceDaily (Nov. 22, 2011) — Researchers from UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center are part of a team that has identified a protein, called P-Rex1, that is key to the movement of cells called melanoblasts. When these cells experience uncontrolled growth, melanoma develops. Continue reading

Lab-made skin cells will aid transplantation, cancer, drug discovery research, say scientists

Lab-made skin cells will aid transplantation, cancer, drug discovery research, say scientists

ScienceDaily (Oct. 26, 2011) — The pigmented cells called melanocytes aren’t just for making freckles and tans. Melanocytes absorb ultraviolet light, protecting the skin from the harmful effects of the sun. Continue reading

Survey of hair professionals finds that some report looking for skin cancer lesions on customers’ scalp, neck and face

Survey of hair professionals finds that some report looking for skin cancer lesions on customers’ scalp, neck and face

ScienceDaily (Oct. 17, 2011) — In a survey of hair professionals, some reported that they look at customers’ face, scalp and neck for suspicious skin lesions, according to a report in the October issue of Archives of Dermatology , one of the JAMA/Archives journals Continue reading

Vitamin D crucial in human immune response to tuberculosis, scientists find

Vitamin D crucial in human immune response to tuberculosis, scientists find

ScienceDaily (Oct. 12, 2011) — Vitamin D is not just important for building strong bones — it also plays an essential role in the body’s fight against infections such as tuberculosis, an international research team including UCLA scientists has found. Tuberculosis, a potentially fatal lung disease, causes an estimated 1.8 million deaths annually, according to the World Health Organization, and it especially impacts those with reduced immunity, such as HIV-infected individuals. Continue reading

Vitamin D crucial in human immune response to tuberculosis, scientists find

Vitamin D crucial in human immune response to tuberculosis, scientists find

ScienceDaily (Oct. 12, 2011) — Vitamin D is not just important for building strong bones — it also plays an essential role in the body’s fight against infections such as tuberculosis, an international research team including UCLA scientists has found. Tuberculosis, a potentially fatal lung disease, causes an estimated 1.8 million deaths annually, according to the World Health Organization, and it especially impacts those with reduced immunity, such as HIV-infected individuals. Continue reading

Invasive melanoma may be more likely in children than adults

Invasive melanoma may be more likely in children than adults

ScienceDaily (Oct. Continue reading

Physicians in varying specialties endure similar levels of mental effort, stress

Physicians in varying specialties endure similar levels of mental effort, stress

ScienceDaily (Sep. 8, 2011) — Although society’s perception might be that surgeons endure greater mental challenges and stress in their work duties than a primary care doctor, new research from experts at the University of Cincinnati shows that this isn’t necessarily the case. Researchers from UC’s departments of public health sciences, neurology, psychology and anthropology used work intensity measurement tools to determine that the level of mental effort and stress within various specialty groups tends to be similar, a finding that may lead to more equitable payment for primary care physicians as well as validating these tools for further assessment of stress and workload in medicine with the goal of improving health care. Continue reading

Prolonged breastfeeding does not protect against eczema, global study shows

Prolonged breastfeeding does not protect against eczema, global study shows

ScienceDaily (Aug. 23, 2011) — The largest worldwide study on the association between breastfeeding, time of weaning and eczema in children has concluded that there is no clear evidence that exclusive breastfeeding for four months or longer protects against childhood eczema Continue reading