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Limiting carbs could reduce breast cancer recurrence in women with positive IGF1 receptor

Limiting carbs could reduce breast cancer recurrence in women with positive IGF1 receptor

Dartmouth researchers have found that reducing carbohydrate intake could reduce the risk of breast cancer recurrence among women whose tumor tissue is positive for the IGF-1 receptor. The study, “Risk of Breast Cancer Recurrence Associated with Carbohydrate Intake and Tissue Expression of IGFI Receptor,” will appear in the July issue of Cancer Epidemiology Biomarkers & Prevention. “There is a growing body of research demonstrating associations between obesity, diabetes, and cancer risk,” said lead author Jennifer A. Continue reading

Calls to end all violence against women and girls in conflict zones

Calls to end all violence against women and girls in conflict zones

Women in conflict zones are likely to suffer from sexual or physical violence at the hands of their husbands or partners before, during and after a period of conflict, warn experts from the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine as politicians, activists and researchers gather today in London for the Global Summit to End Sexual Violence in Conflict. In a Comment published in The Lancet , they urge officials to invest in prevention to keep women and girls safe from all forms of violence. Although international attention has focused primarily on extreme cases of sexual abuse by combatants, such as targeted mass rapes during the Rwandan genocide and in the Democratic Republic of Congo, researchers on gender-based violence are revealing a much wider scope of abuses, perpetrators and victims. Continue reading

Rising tobacco epidemic in Asia linked to elevated risk of death

Rising tobacco epidemic in Asia linked to elevated risk of death

A new study estimates that tobacco smoking has been linked to approximately 2 million deaths among adult men and women in Asia in recent years and predicts a rising death toll. The study, published in PLOS Medicine , was led by Wei Zheng, M.D., Ph.D., MPH, professor of Medicine and director of the Vanderbilt Epidemiology Center, and John Potter, M.D., Ph.D., a member and scientific advisor of the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, Washington. Roughly 60 percent of the world’s population lives in Asia where approximately half of men are tobacco smokers Continue reading

Most breast cancer patients may not be getting enough exercise

Most breast cancer patients may not be getting enough exercise

Physical activity after breast cancer diagnosis has been linked with prolonged survival and improved quality of life, but most participants in a large breast cancer study did not meet national physical activity guidelines after they were diagnosed. Continue reading

Race could be a factor in head, neck cancer survival rates

Race could be a factor in head, neck cancer survival rates

The national survival rates for African-Americans diagnosed with head and neck cancer have not improved in the last 40 years despite advances in the treatment and management of the disease, University of Missouri School of Medicine researchers have found in a new study. More than 52,000 men and women in the United States currently are living with head and neck cancer. Using data from the National Cancer Institute’s Surveillance, epidemiology and end results (SEER) program, MU researchers under the guidance of Mosharraf Hossain, MD, assistant professor in the MU School of Medicine’s Division of Hematology and Oncology and physician with Ellis Fischel Cancer Center in Columbia, Mo., studied the survival trend of five ethnic groups over the last 40 years Continue reading

Bloodstream infections reduced through better central line care at three hospitals

Bloodstream infections reduced through better central line care at three hospitals

Whether through the use of alcohol-containing caps or basic cleaning of the injection port of the central line, infection preventionists at three hospitals are finding successful ways to stop germs from entering central line catheters and causing bloodstream infections in patients. A trio of abstracts, to be presented on June 7 at the 41st Annual Conference of the Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology (APIC), addresses the challenge of keeping bacteria from entering the bloodstream through a central line, a catheter placed in a large vein to deliver medicine and fluids during hospitalization. Patients in intensive care units (ICUs) may need to have their lines accessed 20 or more times per day, increasing the risk for infection and contamination Continue reading

When hospital workers get vaccines, community flu rates fall, study shows

When hospital workers get vaccines, community flu rates fall, study shows

For every 15 healthcare providers who receive the influenza vaccination, one fewer person in the community will contract an influenza-like illness, according to a study using California public health data from 2009 — 2012. In an abstract that will be presented on June 7 at the 41st Annual Conference of the Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology (APIC), a researcher analyzed archival data from the California Department of Public Health to determine the relationship between vaccinating healthcare personnel against influenza and the rate of influenza-like illness in the surrounding community. “This study suggests that there is a strong connection between how many healthcare personnel are vaccinated against the flu and how many cases of influenza-like illnesses are reported in the community,” said James F. Continue reading

When hospital workers get vaccines, community flu rates fall, study shows

When hospital workers get vaccines, community flu rates fall, study shows

For every 15 healthcare providers who receive the influenza vaccination, one fewer person in the community will contract an influenza-like illness, according to a study using California public health data from 2009 — 2012. Continue reading

Radiation for prostate cancer linked to secondary cancers, study finds

Radiation for prostate cancer linked to secondary cancers, study finds

Among men treated for prostate cancer, those who received radiation therapy were more likely to develop bladder or rectal cancer, according to a new study from the University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center. “Overall the incidence of these cancers is low Continue reading

Powerful tool combs family genomes to find shared variations causing disease

Powerful tool combs family genomes to find shared variations causing disease

Scientists at the University of Utah (U of U), the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center in Houston and colleagues have developed a powerful tool called pVAAST that combines linkage analysis with case control association to help researchers and clinicians identify disease-causing mutations in families faster and more precisely than ever before. In a study in Nature Biotechnology , the researchersdescribe cases in which pVAAST (the pedigree Variant Annotation, Analysis and Search Tool) identified mutations in two families with separate diseases and a de novo or new variation in a 12-year-old who was the only one in his family to suffer from a mysterious and life threatening intestinal problem Continue reading