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Dental, nutrition experts call for radical rethink on free sugars intake

Dental, nutrition experts call for radical rethink on free sugars intake

Sugars in the diet should make up no more than 3% of total energy intake to reduce the significant financial and social burdens of tooth decay, finds new research from UCL (University College London) and the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine. The study, published in the open-access journal BMC Public Health , analysed the effect of sugars on dental caries, also known as tooth decay. Continue reading

Certain form of baldness at age 45 linked to higher risk for aggressive prostate cancer

Certain form of baldness at age 45 linked to higher risk for aggressive prostate cancer

A new, large cohort analysis from the prospective Prostate, Lung, Colorectal and Ovarian (PLCO) Cancer Screening Trial, indicates that men who had moderate baldness affecting both the front and the crown of their head at age 45 were at a 40% increased risk of developing aggressive prostate cancer (usually indicates a faster growing tumor resulting in poorer prognosis relative to non-aggressive prostate cancer) later in life, compared to men with no baldness. Continue reading

Certain form of baldness at age 45 linked to higher risk for aggressive prostate cancer

Certain form of baldness at age 45 linked to higher risk for aggressive prostate cancer

A new, large cohort analysis from the prospective Prostate, Lung, Colorectal and Ovarian (PLCO) Cancer Screening Trial, indicates that men who had moderate baldness affecting both the front and the crown of their head at age 45 were at a 40% increased risk of developing aggressive prostate cancer (usually indicates a faster growing tumor resulting in poorer prognosis relative to non-aggressive prostate cancer) later in life, compared to men with no baldness. Continue reading

Potential link between assisted reproduction, autism: No link found

Potential link between assisted reproduction, autism: No link found

When prospective parents have trouble conceiving and decide to seek medical help, they typically experience more than a little anxiety and have a host of questions: What are the potential risks to the mother and the baby? What kinds of diseases or other problems are associated with assisted reproduction? And, is one of those problems autism Continue reading

Healthcare workers wash hands more often when in presence of peers

Healthcare workers wash hands more often when in presence of peers

Nationally, hand hygiene adherence by healthcare workers remains staggeringly low despite its critical importance in infection control. A study in the October issue of Infection Control and Hospital Epidemiology , the journal of the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America (SHEA), found that healthcare workers’ adherence to hand hygiene is better when other workers are nearby. “Social network effects, or peer effects, have been associated with smoking, obesity, happiness and worker productivity Continue reading

Healthcare workers wash hands more often when in presence of peers

Healthcare workers wash hands more often when in presence of peers

Nationally, hand hygiene adherence by healthcare workers remains staggeringly low despite its critical importance in infection control. A study in the October issue of Infection Control and Hospital Epidemiology , the journal of the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America (SHEA), found that healthcare workers’ adherence to hand hygiene is better when other workers are nearby. “Social network effects, or peer effects, have been associated with smoking, obesity, happiness and worker productivity. Continue reading

Potassium-rich foods cut stroke, death risks among older women

Potassium-rich foods cut stroke, death risks among older women

Postmenopausal women who eat foods higher in potassium are less likely to have strokes and die than women who eat less potassium-rich foods, according to new research in the American Heart Association’s journal Stroke. “Previous studies have shown that potassium consumption may lower blood pressure. But whether potassium intake could prevent stroke or death wasn’t clear,” said Sylvia Wassertheil-Smoller, Ph.D., study senior author and distinguished university professor emerita, department of epidemiology and population health at Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY. Continue reading

Exposure of pregnant women to certain phenols may disrupt growth of boys during fetal development and first years of life

Exposure of pregnant women to certain phenols may disrupt growth of boys during fetal development and first years of life

A research consortium bringing together teams from Inserm, the Nancy and Poitiers University Hospitals, and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC, Atlanta, USA), and coordinated by the Inserm and University of Grenoble Environmental Epidemiology team (Unit 823), has just published an epidemiological study indicating that exposure to certain phenols during pregnancy, especially parabens and triclosan, may disrupt growth of boys during fetal growth and the first years of life. Bisphenol A was not associated with any definite modification in growth. Continue reading

New model predicts patients with type 1 diabetes who will go on to develop major complications

New model predicts patients with type 1 diabetes who will go on to develop major complications

New research published in Diabetologia (the journal of the European Association for the Study of Diabetes) presents a new model for predicting which patients with type 1 diabetes will go on to develop major complications, through easily and routinely measured risk factors. The research is by Assistant Professor Sabita Soedamah-Muthu, Wageningen University, Netherlands, and colleagues. To create the model, data were analysed from 1,973 participants with type 1 diabetes followed for seven years in the EURODIAB Prospective Complications Study, and strong prognostic factors of major outcomes were combined into a computer model Continue reading

Expanding age of eligibility for measles vaccination could increase childhood survival in Africa

Expanding age of eligibility for measles vaccination could increase childhood survival in Africa

Expanding the age of eligibility for measles vaccination from 12 to 15 months could have potentially large effects on coverage in Africa, according to a new report published by Princeton University’s Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs. Continue reading