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Suicidal behaviour not increased by ADHD drugs, research concludes

Suicidal behaviour not increased by ADHD drugs, research concludes

A new register-based study from Karolinska Institutet in Sweden shows that drug therapy for ADHD does not entail an increased risk of suicide attempts or suicide, as was previously feared. The results are published in the British Medical Journal (BMJ). Continue reading

Suicidal behaviour not increased by ADHD drugs, research concludes

Suicidal behaviour not increased by ADHD drugs, research concludes

A new register-based study from Karolinska Institutet in Sweden shows that drug therapy for ADHD does not entail an increased risk of suicide attempts or suicide, as was previously feared. The results are published in the British Medical Journal (BMJ). Continue reading

No evidence that soy food protects against endometrial cancer, study finds

No evidence that soy food protects against endometrial cancer, study finds

Researchers have found no evidence of a protective association between soy food and endometrial cancer risk, says a new study published (18 June) in BJOG: An International Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology . Soy foods are an almost exclusive dietary source of isoflavones, a plant-derived estrogen Continue reading

Conditions linked to deadly bird flu revealed: High risk areas identified

Conditions linked to deadly bird flu revealed: High risk areas identified

A dangerous strain of avian influenza, H7N9, that’s causing severe illness and deaths in China may be inhabiting a small fraction of its potential range and appears at risk of spreading to other suitable areas of India, Bangladesh, Vietnam, Indonesia and the Philippines, according to a new study published today in the journal Nature Communications . Continue reading

Genetic influence on pulmonary function: six further genes identified

Genetic influence on pulmonary function: six further genes identified

In an analysis of several genome-wide association studies, an international team of scientists has identified six novel gene regions that are associated with the function of the lungs. Their results have been published in the current issue of the Nature Genetics scientific journal. In their investigations or so-called genome-wide association studies, the team of researchers compared the genetic profile of study participants to the forced vital capacity (FVC), a volume parameter of lung function Continue reading

Fasting reduces cholesterol levels in prediabetic people over extended period of time, new research finds

Fasting reduces cholesterol levels in prediabetic people over extended period of time, new research finds

For prediabetics, many interventions focus on lifestyle changes and weight loss, but new research on periodic fasting has identified a biological process in the body that converts bad cholesterol in fat cells to energy, thus combating diabetes risk factors. Researchers at the Intermountain Heart Institute at Intermountain Medical Center in Murray, Utah, noticed that after 10 to 12 hours of time fasting, the body starts scavenging for other sources of energy throughout the body to sustain itself. The body pulls LDL (bad) cholesterol from the fat cells and uses it as energy Continue reading

Genotyping can predict disease outcomes in rheumatoid arthritis patients

Genotyping can predict disease outcomes in rheumatoid arthritis patients

New cohort studies presented today at the European League Against Rheumatism Annual Congress (EULAR 2014) have shown the amino acid valine at position 11 of HLA-DRB1 gene to be the strongest independent genetic determinant of radiological damage in rheumatoid arthritis (RA).1 In addition, positions 71 and 74 were found to represent independent predictors, with the three positions together: 11, 71 and 74 strongly associated with disease outcomes.1 According to lead author Dr Sebastien Viatte of the Arthritis Research UK Centre for Genetics and Genomics, Manchester, United Kingdom, “this major advance in genetics might allow stratification of RA patients at the onset of their disease to identify those at risk of joint damage and early death, and also those who are more likely to respond to anti-TNF biological therapy.” RA is a common chronic inflammatory autoimmune disease characterised by inflammation of synovial joints leading to damage to the inside of the joint and surrounding soft tissues. The cause of RA is largely unknown, but both environmental factors and genetic susceptibility appear to be involved. Although the prevalence of RA is relatively constant in most countries at between 0.5-1.0 percent, the higher occurrence among native American-Indian populations and very low occurrence in China and Japan supports the strong influence of genotype on the epidemiology.2 Previously, a group of alleles on the HLA DRB1 gene, known as the ‘shared epitope’ was thought to have the strongest effect on RA susceptibility. Continue reading

Processed red meat linked to higher risk of heart failure, death in men

Processed red meat linked to higher risk of heart failure, death in men

Men who eat moderate amounts of processed red meat may have an increased risk of incidence and death from heart failure, according to a study in Circulation: Heart Failure , an American Heart Association journal. Processed meats are preserved by smoking, curing, salting or adding preservatives. Examples include cold cuts (ham, salami), sausage, bacon and hot dogs. Continue reading

Coordinated intervention reduced prevalence of drug-resistant CRE in long-term care

Coordinated intervention reduced prevalence of drug-resistant CRE in long-term care

A new study found a nationwide effort to control carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae (CRE) in Israel reduced CRE cases by improving compliance of infection control standards and using a coordinated intervention focused on long-term care facilities. Continue reading

Central-line associated bloodstream infections: Real world implementation strategies

Central-line associated bloodstream infections: Real world implementation strategies

As central-line associated bloodstream infections (CLABSIs) pose a danger to vulnerable patients, infection prevention and control experts released new practical recommendations to assist acute care hospitals in implementing and prioritizing prevention efforts. The guidance was published in the July issue of Infection Control and Hospital Epidemiolog y and produced in a collaborative effort led by the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America, the Infectious Diseases Society of America, the American Hospital Association, the Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology and The Joint Commission Continue reading