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Spices and herbs intervention helps adults reduce salt intake

Spices and herbs intervention helps adults reduce salt intake

Teaching people how to flavor food with spices and herbs is considerably more effective at lowering salt intake than having them do it on their own, according to research presented on Wednesday at the American Heart Association’s Epidemiology & Prevention/Nutrition, Physical Activity & Metabolism Scientific Sessions 2014. In the first phase of the study, 55 volunteers ate a low-sodium diet for four weeks. Continue reading

Program taught in American Sign Language helps deaf achieve healthier weight

Program taught in American Sign Language helps deaf achieve healthier weight

A group of deaf adults using American Sign Language in a healthy lifestyle program successfully lost weight, according to a study presented Wednesday. In the first randomized trial of lifestyle modification or weight reduction with deaf people using American Sign Language, participants had moderate improvements in their weight and level of physical activity after a 16-week program. Continue reading

US women unfamiliar with most stroke warning signs

US women unfamiliar with most stroke warning signs

Many U.S. Continue reading

Ruling with an iron fist could make your child pack on pounds

Ruling with an iron fist could make your child pack on pounds

If you’re rigid with rules and skimpy on affection and dialogue with your kids, they have a greater chance of being obese, according to research presented at the American Heart Association’s Epidemiology & Prevention/Nutrition, Physical Activity & Metabolism Scientific Sessions 2014. Researchers followed a nationally representative group of 37,577 Canadian children aged 0 to 11. They compared kids whose parents are generally affectionate, have reasonable discussions about behavior with their child and set healthy boundaries (authoritative) with those whose parents were strict about limits without much dialogue or affection (authoritarian). Continue reading

Child ADHD stimulant medication use leads to BMI rebound in late adolescence

Child ADHD stimulant medication use leads to BMI rebound in late adolescence

A new study from researchers at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health found that children treated with stimulants for attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) experienced slower body mass index (BMI) growth than their undiagnosed or untreated peers, followed by a rapid rebound of BMI that exceeded that of children with no history of ADHD or stimulant use and that could continue to obesity. The study, thought to be the most comprehensive analysis of ADHD and stimulant use in children to date, found that the earlier the medication began, and the longer the medication was taken, the slower the BMI growth in earlier childhood but the more rapid the BMI rebound in late adolescence, typically after discontinuation of medication. Researchers concluded that stimulant use, and not a diagnosis of ADHD, was associated with higher BMI and obesity. Continue reading

Archaeologists discover earliest complete example of a human with cancer, from 3,000 years ago

Archaeologists discover earliest complete example of a human with cancer, from 3,000 years ago

Archaeologists have found the oldest complete example in the world of a human with metastatic cancer in a 3,000 year-old skeleton. The findings are reported in the academic journal PLOS ONE today (17 March). The skeleton of the young adult male was found by a Durham University PhD student in a tomb in modern Sudan in 2013 and dates back to 1200BC. Continue reading

Health gap between adult survivors of childhood cancer, siblings widens with age

Health gap between adult survivors of childhood cancer, siblings widens with age

Adult survivors of childhood cancer face significant health problems as they age and are five times more likely than their siblings to develop new cancers, heart and other serious health conditions beyond the age of 35, according to the latest findings from the world’s largest study of childhood cancer survivors. St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital led the research, results of which appear in the March 17 issue of the Journal of Clinical Oncology Continue reading

Younger men receive faster care for heart attacks, angina compared with women of same age, study shows

Younger men receive faster care for heart attacks, angina compared with women of same age, study shows

A new study indicates that in younger adults experiencing heart attacks and angina, men are more likely to receive faster care compared with women. The study, published in CMAJ ( Canadian Medical Association Journal ) also found that gender-related factors affected access to care for both men and women. To understand why sex differences in mortality exist in younger men and women with acute coronary syndrome, researchers included 1123 patients aged 18 to 55 years recruited from 24 centres across Canada, 1 in the United States and 1 in Switzerland Continue reading

Married women less likely to die from heart disease

Married women less likely to die from heart disease

Married women are 28% less likely to die from heart disease than unmarried women, a new study has found. Continue reading

Married women less likely to die from heart disease

Married women less likely to die from heart disease

Married women are 28% less likely to die from heart disease than unmarried women, a new study has found. This is despite the fact that marriage makes no difference to women’s chances of developing heart disease in the first place. Continue reading