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Physician practice facilitation ensures key medical care reaches children

Physician practice facilitation ensures key medical care reaches children

Leona Cuttler, MD, knew in her core that the simple act of adding an outside eye could dramatically improve pediatric care. Today, a study of more than 16,000 patient visits published online in the journal Pediatrics proves Cuttler’s thesis correct. The lead investigator on the research project, Cuttler succumbed to cancer late last year. Continue reading

Smoking during pregnancy may raise risk for heart defects in babies

Smoking during pregnancy may raise risk for heart defects in babies

Women who smoke during pregnancy may be putting their newborns at risk for congenital heart defects, and the more they smoke, the higher the risk, according to a study to be presented Saturday, May 3, at the Pediatric Academic Societies (PAS) annual meeting in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. Cigarette smoking during pregnancy has been linked to many birth defects, such as cleft lips and palates, and missing and deformed limbs. Continue reading

Smoking during pregnancy may raise risk for heart defects in babies

Smoking during pregnancy may raise risk for heart defects in babies

Women who smoke during pregnancy may be putting their newborns at risk for congenital heart defects, and the more they smoke, the higher the risk, according to a study to be presented Saturday, May 3, at the Pediatric Academic Societies (PAS) annual meeting in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. Cigarette smoking during pregnancy has been linked to many birth defects, such as cleft lips and palates, and missing and deformed limbs. Continue reading

Estimating baby’s size gets more precise

Estimating baby’s size gets more precise

New Michigan State University research aims to help doctors estimate the size of newborns with a new set of birth weight measurements based on birth records from across the country. “More than 7 million records were reviewed,” said Nicole Talge, an assistant professor in MSU’s Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, who co-led the study which is now available in the journal Pediatrics. “Our research looked at live births in the United States during 2009-2010 and using a newly developed method, corrected unlikely gestational ages during that time. Continue reading

Radiation therapy for cervical cancer increases risk for colorectal cancer

Radiation therapy for cervical cancer increases risk for colorectal cancer

Researchers at the University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston are the first to recommend that young women treated with radiation for cervical cancer should begin colorectal cancer screening earlier than traditionally recommended. The UTMB researchers, finding a high incidence of secondary colorectal cancers among cervical cancer survivors treated with radiation, offer new recommendations that the younger women in this group begin colorectal cancer screening about eight years after their initial cervical cancer diagnosis instead of waiting until age 50 Continue reading

Antibiotics improve growth in children in developing countries

Antibiotics improve growth in children in developing countries

Antibiotics improve growth in children at risk of undernourishment in low and middle income countries, according to researchers at McGill University who have just conducted a research literature review on the subject. Their results, published in the British Medical Journal , suggest that the youngest children from the most vulnerable populations benefit most and show significant improvements toward expected growth for their age and sex, particularly for weight. Malnutrition in early childhood, reflected in poor growth, is the cause of nearly half of all mortality worldwide in children less than five years old. Continue reading

Antibiotics improve growth in children in developing countries

Antibiotics improve growth in children in developing countries

Antibiotics improve growth in children at risk of undernourishment in low and middle income countries, according to researchers at McGill University who have just conducted a research literature review on the subject. Their results, published in the British Medical Journal , suggest that the youngest children from the most vulnerable populations benefit most and show significant improvements toward expected growth for their age and sex, particularly for weight Continue reading

Prolonged, heavy bleeding during menopause is common

Prolonged, heavy bleeding during menopause is common

Women going through menopause most likely think of it as the time for an end to predictable monthly periods. Researchers at the University of Michigan say it’s normal, however, for the majority of them to experience an increase in the amount and duration of bleeding episodes, which may occur at various times throughout the menopausal transition. The researchers from the U-M School of Public Health and U-M Health System offer the first long-term study of bleeding patterns in women of multiple race/ethnicities who were going through menopause Continue reading

Prolonged, heavy bleeding during menopause is common

Prolonged, heavy bleeding during menopause is common

Women going through menopause most likely think of it as the time for an end to predictable monthly periods. Researchers at the University of Michigan say it’s normal, however, for the majority of them to experience an increase in the amount and duration of bleeding episodes, which may occur at various times throughout the menopausal transition. The researchers from the U-M School of Public Health and U-M Health System offer the first long-term study of bleeding patterns in women of multiple race/ethnicities who were going through menopause Continue reading

Low vitamin D linked to fatty liver disease in UK children

Low vitamin D linked to fatty liver disease in UK children

A UK studyi investigating the link between low vitamin D status and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) in British children has identified a genetic variant associated with the disease’s severity. The research, conducted by the King’s College Hospital Paediatric Liver Centre and the University of Surrey’s School of Biosciences and Medicine, and funded by the Children’s Liver Disease Foundation retrospectively analysed the medical records of 120 paediatric patients with NAFLD. The findings could carry significant implications for UK clinicians in light of the nation’s rising number of childhood NAFLD cases. Continue reading