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Similarities between HIV/AIDS, opioid addiction epidemics

Similarities between HIV/AIDS, opioid addiction epidemics

There are important parallels between the early years of the HIV/AIDS epidemic and the current epidemic of opioid addiction — ones that could trigger a significant shift in opioid addiction prevention, diagnosis and treatment. These are the findings of a comparative review of HIV/AIDS and addiction by researchers Josiah D. Rich, M.D., M.P.H., director of the Center for Prisoner Health and Human Rights, based at The Miriam Hospital; Traci C. Continue reading

Twenty Years Later: How Breast Cancer Risk Genes are Changing Patient Care

Twenty Years Later: How Breast Cancer Risk Genes are Changing Patient Care

In the mid-1990s, scientists for the first time were able to isolate and clone the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes, mutations in which were thought to increase susceptibility to early onset breast and ovarian cancers. A new Perspective published last week in Science takes a look back at the last twenty years to show how the identification of these genes set in motion a firestorm of research aimed at exploring how genetic information can be used to create both standards of care and strategies for all patients at a high-risk of developing cancer. Much has been learned over the last twenty years and now, Penn Medicine’s Basser Research Center for BRCA — the first and only comprehensive BRCA-focused center of its kind — is at the forefront of the next generation of research about genetics and cancer risk, methods for risk reduction and prevention, and new cancer treatment therapies. Continue reading

Eating seven or more portions of fruit and vegetables a day reduces your risk of death by 42 percent

Eating seven or more portions of fruit and vegetables a day reduces your risk of death by 42 percent

Eating seven or more portions of fruit and vegetables a day reduces your risk of death at any point in time by 42% compared to eating less than one portion, reports a new UCL study. Researchers used the Health Survey for England to study the eating habits of 65,226 people representative of the English population between 2001 and 2013, and found that the more fruit and vegetables they ate, the less likely they were to die at any age. Continue reading

Underweight people at as high risk of dying as obese people, new study finds

Underweight people at as high risk of dying as obese people, new study finds

Being underweight puts people at highest risk of dying, just as obesity does, new research has found. Continue reading

Antidepressants during pregnancy linked to preterm birth

Antidepressants during pregnancy linked to preterm birth

Antidepressant medications taken by pregnant women are associated with increased rates of preterm birth. Continue reading

Twenty-five percent of breast cancer survivors report financial decline due to treatment

Twenty-five percent of breast cancer survivors report financial decline due to treatment

Four years after being treated for breast cancer, a quarter of survivors say they are worse off financially, at least partly because of their treatment, according to a new study led by University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center researchers. In addition, 12 percent reported that they still have medical debt from their treatment. Continue reading

Number of patients admitted with antibiotic-resistant infections is rising

Number of patients admitted with antibiotic-resistant infections is rising

The emergence of community-acquired infections, such as urinary tract infections (UTI), due to strains resistant to common antibiotics are on the rise, according to Rhode Island Hospital researchers. The study is published online in the journal Antimicrobial Resistance and Infection Control Continue reading

Spices and herbs intervention helps adults reduce salt intake

Spices and herbs intervention helps adults reduce salt intake

Teaching people how to flavor food with spices and herbs is considerably more effective at lowering salt intake than having them do it on their own, according to research presented on Wednesday at the American Heart Association’s Epidemiology & Prevention/Nutrition, Physical Activity & Metabolism Scientific Sessions 2014. In the first phase of the study, 55 volunteers ate a low-sodium diet for four weeks. Continue reading

Program taught in American Sign Language helps deaf achieve healthier weight

Program taught in American Sign Language helps deaf achieve healthier weight

A group of deaf adults using American Sign Language in a healthy lifestyle program successfully lost weight, according to a study presented Wednesday. In the first randomized trial of lifestyle modification or weight reduction with deaf people using American Sign Language, participants had moderate improvements in their weight and level of physical activity after a 16-week program. Continue reading

US women unfamiliar with most stroke warning signs

US women unfamiliar with most stroke warning signs

Many U.S. Continue reading