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Pregnancy loss, cardiovascular disease connected by new study

Pregnancy loss, cardiovascular disease connected by new study

The Annals of Family Medicine today published an article detailing research showing that women with a history of pregnancy loss are at higher risk for cardiovascular disease later in adulthood than other women, work completed by physicians in the Center for Primary Care and Prevention (CPCP) at Memorial Hospital of Rhode Island. The article “Risk of Cardiovascular Disease Among Postmenopausal Women with Prior Pregnancy Loss: The Women’s Health Initiative” stems from the analysis of data from the maternity experiences of a sample of 77,701 women, according to Donna Parker, ScD, director for community health and research with the CPCP Continue reading

Limiting carbs could reduce breast cancer recurrence in women with positive IGF1 receptor

Limiting carbs could reduce breast cancer recurrence in women with positive IGF1 receptor

Dartmouth researchers have found that reducing carbohydrate intake could reduce the risk of breast cancer recurrence among women whose tumor tissue is positive for the IGF-1 receptor. The study, “Risk of Breast Cancer Recurrence Associated with Carbohydrate Intake and Tissue Expression of IGFI Receptor,” will appear in the July issue of Cancer Epidemiology Biomarkers & Prevention. “There is a growing body of research demonstrating associations between obesity, diabetes, and cancer risk,” said lead author Jennifer A. Continue reading

Achieving patient-centered care across the spectrum

Achieving patient-centered care across the spectrum

Providing patient-centered care consistently in clinical practice requires practitioners who are able to recognize that different clinical situations require different approaches and are skilled enough to adapt. Across the range of health-care problems, patient-centered care has been found to be associated with improved patient outcomes, including improved self-management, patient satisfaction, and medication adherence, and some studies have found evidence for improved clinical outcomes Continue reading

Novel analyses improve identification of cancer-associated genes from microarray data

Novel analyses improve identification of cancer-associated genes from microarray data

Dartmouth Institute for Quantitative Biomedical Sciences (iQBS) researchers developed a new gene expression analysis approach for identifying cancer genes. The paper entitled, “How to get the most from microarray data: advice from reverse genomics,” was published online March 21, 2014 in BMC Genomics . Continue reading

Program taught in American Sign Language helps deaf achieve healthier weight

Program taught in American Sign Language helps deaf achieve healthier weight

A group of deaf adults using American Sign Language in a healthy lifestyle program successfully lost weight, according to a study presented Wednesday. In the first randomized trial of lifestyle modification or weight reduction with deaf people using American Sign Language, participants had moderate improvements in their weight and level of physical activity after a 16-week program. Continue reading

Prostate specific antigen screening declines after 2012 USPSTF recommendations

Prostate specific antigen screening declines after 2012 USPSTF recommendations

Researchers at Case Western Reserve University and University Hospitals Case Medical Center have assessed the impact of the 2012 U.S. Continue reading

Prostate specific antigen screening declines after 2012 USPSTF recommendations

Prostate specific antigen screening declines after 2012 USPSTF recommendations

Researchers at Case Western Reserve University and University Hospitals Case Medical Center have assessed the impact of the 2012 U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommendations against routine prostate specific antigen (PSA) cancer screenings, which cited evidence that the risks of screening outweigh the benefits. Results of the current study indicate that the USPSTF recommendations have resulted in a decrease in the number of PSA screenings ordered by doctors, with the greatest decline seen among urologists Continue reading

To prevent injuries, young athletes may need to play more just for fun

To prevent injuries, young athletes may need to play more just for fun

Jan. 11, 2013 — One way to avoid injuries in young athletes may be for them to simply spend more time in unorganized free play such as pick-up games, a Loyola University Medical Study has found. Continue reading

Residents believe vacant land threatens community, physical and mental health

Residents believe vacant land threatens community, physical and mental health

ScienceDaily (Nov. 30, 2012) — As public health researchers continue efforts to understand the effects of neighborhood conditions on health, residents themselves can provide valuable insights regarding public health issues and potential solutions. A new study from researchers at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania uses in-depth interviews with local residents to examine perspectives on how vacant land affects community, physical, and mental health Continue reading

Heavily indebted med students choosing primary care face greater financial challenges

Heavily indebted med students choosing primary care face greater financial challenges

ScienceDaily (Nov. 27, 2012) — Researchers at Boston University and the Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC) have determined that heavily indebted medical students choosing primary care careers will experience difficulty paying their student debt unless they consider alternative strategies to support repayment. These findings appear online in Academic Medicine , the peer-reviewed Journal of the AAMC Continue reading