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Genetic factors behind surviving or dying from Ebola shown in mouse study

Genetic factors behind surviving or dying from Ebola shown in mouse study

A newly developed mouse model suggests that genetic factors are behind the mild-to-deadly range of reactions to the Ebola virus. People exposed to Ebola vary in how the virus affects them. Some completely resist the disease, others suffer moderate to severe illness and recover, while those who are most susceptible succumb to bleeding, organ failure and shock Continue reading

High-intensity sound waves may aid regenerative medicine

High-intensity sound waves may aid regenerative medicine

Researchers at the University of Washington have developed a way to use sound to create cellular scaffolding for tissue engineering, a unique approach that could help overcome one of regenerative medicine’s significant obstacles. The researchers will present their technique at the 168th meeting of the Acoustical Society of America (ASA), held October 27-31, 2014, at the Indianapolis Marriott Downtown Hotel Continue reading

First detailed picture of cancer-related cell enzyme in action on chromosome unit

First detailed picture of cancer-related cell enzyme in action on chromosome unit

A landmark study to be published in the October 30, 2014 print edition of the journal Nature provides new insight into the function of an enzyme related to the BRCA1 breast cancer protein. Continue reading

Case study: Hearing loss in one infant twin affects mother’s speech to both babies

Case study: Hearing loss in one infant twin affects mother’s speech to both babies

Is it possible that hearing loss in one infant from a pair of twins can affect the mother’s speech to both infants? A new acoustics study zeroes in on this question and suggests that not only is this alteration of speech entirely possible, but that mothers speak to both infants as if they are hearing impaired. The study explores the acoustic characteristics of three mothers’ speech towards their infant twins. Continue reading

Novel ultrasound technology to screen for heart conditions developed by engineers

Novel ultrasound technology to screen for heart conditions developed by engineers

Engineers at the University of California, San Diego have determined for the first time the impact of a ring-shaped vortex on transporting blood flow in normal and abnormal ventricles within the human heart. They worked with cardiologists at the Non-Invasive Cardiology Laboratory at Gregorio Marañon Hospital, in Madrid, Spain. In order to make the study possible, researchers have developed a novel ultrasound technology that makes screening cheaper and much easier, making it possible to reach a large number of people and even infants. Continue reading

Tiny carbon nanotube pores make big impact

Tiny carbon nanotube pores make big impact

A team led by the Lawrence Livermore scientists has created a new kind of ion channel consisting of short carbon nanotubes, which can be inserted into synthetic bilayers and live cell membranes to form tiny pores that transport water, protons, small ions and DNA. These carbon nanotube “porins” have significant implications for future health care and bioengineering applications. Continue reading

Scientists generate first human stomach tissue in lab with stem cells

Scientists generate first human stomach tissue in lab with stem cells

Scientists used pluripotent stem cells to generate functional, three-dimensional human stomach tissue in a laboratory — creating an unprecedented tool for researching the development and diseases of an organ central to several public health crises, ranging from cancer to diabetes. Scientists at Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center report Oct. 29 in Nature they used human pluripotent stem cells — which can become any cell type in the body — to grow a miniature version of the stomach Continue reading

Dietary cocoa flavanols reverse age-related memory decline in mice

Dietary cocoa flavanols reverse age-related memory decline in mice

Dietary cocoa flavanols — naturally occurring bioactives found in cocoa — reversed age-related memory decline in healthy older adults, according to a study led by Columbia University Medical Center (CUMC) scientists. The study, published today in the advance online issue of Nature Neuroscience , provides the first direct evidence that one component of age-related memory decline in humans is caused by changes in a specific region of the brain and that this form of memory decline can be improved by a dietary intervention Continue reading

Benchmark proposed to better replicate natural stem cell development in the laboratory environment

Benchmark proposed to better replicate natural stem cell development in the laboratory environment

In a study that will provide the foundation for scientists to better replicate natural stem cell development in an artificial environment, UCLA researchers at the Eli and Edythe Broad Center of Regenerative Medicine and Stem Cell Research led by Dr. Guoping Fan, professor of human genetics, have established a benchmarking standard to assess how culture conditions used to procure stem cells in the lab compare to those found in the human embryo. The study was published online ahead of print in the journal Cell Stem Cell Continue reading

Australian doctors transplants first circulatory death human heart

Australian doctors transplants first circulatory death human heart

The St Vincent’s Hospital Heart Lung Transplant Unit has carried out the world’s first distant procurement of hearts donated after circulatory death (DCD). These hearts were subsequently resuscitated and then successfully transplanted into patients with end-stage heart failure Continue reading