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Healthy humans make nice homes for viruses

Healthy humans make nice homes for viruses

The same viruses that make us sick can take up residence in and on the human body without provoking a sneeze, cough or other troublesome symptom, according to new research at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis. Continue reading

Healthy humans make nice homes for viruses

Healthy humans make nice homes for viruses

The same viruses that make us sick can take up residence in and on the human body without provoking a sneeze, cough or other troublesome symptom, according to new research at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis. Continue reading

Brain scans used to forecast early reading difficulties

Brain scans used to forecast early reading difficulties

UC San Francisco researchers have used brain scans to predict how young children learn to read, giving clinicians a possible tool to spot children with dyslexia and other reading difficulties before they experience reading challenges. In the United States, children usually learn to read for the first time in kindergarten and become proficient readers by third grade, according to the authors Continue reading

EEG study findings reveal how fear is processed in the brain

EEG study findings reveal how fear is processed in the brain

An estimated 8% of Americans will suffer from post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) at some point during their lifetime. Brought on by an overwhelming or stressful event or events, PTSD is the result of altered chemistry and physiology of the brain Continue reading

EEG study findings reveal how fear is processed in the brain

EEG study findings reveal how fear is processed in the brain

An estimated 8% of Americans will suffer from post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) at some point during their lifetime. Brought on by an overwhelming or stressful event or events, PTSD is the result of altered chemistry and physiology of the brain. Continue reading

Combining Epilepsy Drug, Morphine Can Result in Less Pain, Lower Opioid Doses

Combining Epilepsy Drug, Morphine Can Result in Less Pain, Lower Opioid Doses

Adding a common epilepsy drug to a morphine regimen can result in better pain control with fewer side effects. Moreover, the combination can reduce the dosage of the opioid needed to be effective, according to a team of pain researchers at Indiana University. The result could bring significant relief to many patients with neuropathic pain, a difficult-to-treat condition often felt in the arms and legs and associated with nerve tissue damage. Continue reading

Worldwide study demonstrates accuracy of genetic analyses

Worldwide study demonstrates accuracy of genetic analyses

Physicians envision a future in which genomic data from patients is heavily used to manage care, but experts have questioned the accuracy and reliability of these analyses. Now, a study by 150 researchers in 12 countries finds real strength and agreement across RNA genomic sequencing techniques and laboratories — as well as ways to improve what little variability exists to set a new high standard. The results of the study were published in Nature Biotechnology in three separate research articles Continue reading

Environmental costs, health risks, and benefits of fracking examined

Environmental costs, health risks, and benefits of fracking examined

A strange thing happened on the way to dealing with climate change: Advances in hydraulic fracturing put trillions of dollars’ worth of previously unreachable oil and natural gas within humanity’s grasp. The environmental costs — and benefits — from “fracking,” which requires blasting huge amounts of water, sand and chemicals deep into underground rock formations, are the subject of new research that synthesizes 165 academic studies and government databases. The survey covers not only greenhouse gas impacts but also fracking’s influence on local air pollution, earthquakes and, especially, supplies of clean water Continue reading

Simple method turns human skin cells into immune strengthening white blood cells

Simple method turns human skin cells into immune strengthening white blood cells

For the first time, scientists have turned human skin cells into transplantable white blood cells, soldiers of the immune system that fight infections and invaders. The work, done at the Salk Institute, could let researchers create therapies that introduce into the body new white blood cells capable of attacking diseased or cancerous cells or augmenting immune responses against other disorders. Continue reading

Simple method turns human skin cells into immune strengthening white blood cells

Simple method turns human skin cells into immune strengthening white blood cells

For the first time, scientists have turned human skin cells into transplantable white blood cells, soldiers of the immune system that fight infections and invaders. The work, done at the Salk Institute, could let researchers create therapies that introduce into the body new white blood cells capable of attacking diseased or cancerous cells or augmenting immune responses against other disorders. The work, as detailed in the journal Stem Cells , shows that only a bit of creative manipulation is needed to turn skin cells into human white blood cells Continue reading