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Wound-healing role for microRNAs in colon offer new insight to inflammatory bowel diseases

Wound-healing role for microRNAs in colon offer new insight to inflammatory bowel diseases

A microRNA cluster believed to be important for suppressing colon cancer has been found to play a critical role in wound healing in the intestine, UT Southwestern cancer researchers have found. The findings, first discovered in mice and later reproduced in human cells, could provide a fresh avenue for investigating chronic digestive diseases and for potentially repairing damage in these and other disease or injury settings. “We identified a novel role for microRNAs in regulating wound healing in the intestine Continue reading

Wound-healing role for microRNAs in colon offer new insight to inflammatory bowel diseases

Wound-healing role for microRNAs in colon offer new insight to inflammatory bowel diseases

A microRNA cluster believed to be important for suppressing colon cancer has been found to play a critical role in wound healing in the intestine, UT Southwestern cancer researchers have found. The findings, first discovered in mice and later reproduced in human cells, could provide a fresh avenue for investigating chronic digestive diseases and for potentially repairing damage in these and other disease or injury settings. Continue reading

How Alzheimer’s blood test could be first step in developing treatments to halt or slow disease

How Alzheimer’s blood test could be first step in developing treatments to halt or slow disease

In March of this year, a team of Georgetown University scientists published research showing that, for the first time ever, a blood test has the potential to predict Alzheimer’s disease before patients start showing symptoms. AACC is pleased to announce that a late-breaking session at the 2014 AACC Annual Meeting & Clinical Lab Expo in Chicago will expand upon this groundbreaking research and discuss why it could be the key to curing this devastating illness. According to the World Health Organization, the number of Alzheimer’s patients worldwide is expected to skyrocket from the 35.6 million individuals who lived with it in 2010 to 115.4 million by 2050. Continue reading

How Alzheimer’s blood test could be first step in developing treatments to halt or slow disease

How Alzheimer’s blood test could be first step in developing treatments to halt or slow disease

In March of this year, a team of Georgetown University scientists published research showing that, for the first time ever, a blood test has the potential to predict Alzheimer’s disease before patients start showing symptoms. AACC is pleased to announce that a late-breaking session at the 2014 AACC Annual Meeting & Clinical Lab Expo in Chicago will expand upon this groundbreaking research and discuss why it could be the key to curing this devastating illness. Continue reading

Active genes in neurons profiled based on connections

Active genes in neurons profiled based on connections

When it comes to the brain, wiring isn’t everything. Although neurobiologists often talk in electrical metaphors, the reality is that the brain is not nearly as simple as a series of wires and circuits. Unlike their copper counterparts, neurons can behave differently depending on the situation. Continue reading

Active genes in neurons profiled based on connections

Active genes in neurons profiled based on connections

When it comes to the brain, wiring isn’t everything. Although neurobiologists often talk in electrical metaphors, the reality is that the brain is not nearly as simple as a series of wires and circuits. Continue reading

Active genes in neurons profiled based on connections

Active genes in neurons profiled based on connections

When it comes to the brain, wiring isn’t everything. Although neurobiologists often talk in electrical metaphors, the reality is that the brain is not nearly as simple as a series of wires and circuits. Unlike their copper counterparts, neurons can behave differently depending on the situation Continue reading

Body clock and its biological impact: Fruit fly research to provide new insight

Body clock and its biological impact: Fruit fly research to provide new insight

New research at the University of Southampton into how animals keep time through their internal circadian rhythms could help us understand why we sleep and how we cope with jet lag. Biological scientist Dr Herman Wijnen uses the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster as an experimental model as the molecular and cellular ‘clock’ mechanisms of insects closely resemble those of mammals, including humans. As these biological clock systems not only control sleep, but also influence functions such as blood pressure and metabolic rate, they could give us greater insight into many medical conditions Continue reading

Body clock and its biological impact: Fruit fly research to provide new insight

Body clock and its biological impact: Fruit fly research to provide new insight

New research at the University of Southampton into how animals keep time through their internal circadian rhythms could help us understand why we sleep and how we cope with jet lag. Biological scientist Dr Herman Wijnen uses the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster as an experimental model as the molecular and cellular ‘clock’ mechanisms of insects closely resemble those of mammals, including humans. As these biological clock systems not only control sleep, but also influence functions such as blood pressure and metabolic rate, they could give us greater insight into many medical conditions Continue reading

Misguided DNA-repair proteins caught in the act

Misguided DNA-repair proteins caught in the act

Accumulation of DNA damage can cause aggressive forms of cancer and accelerated aging, so the body’s DNA repair mechanisms are normally key to good health. However, in some diseases the DNA repair machinery can become harmful Continue reading