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New way to make muscle cells from human stem cells

New way to make muscle cells from human stem cells

As stem cells continue their gradual transition from the lab to the clinic, a research group at the University of Wisconsin-Madison has discovered a new way to make large concentrations of skeletal muscle cells and muscle progenitors from human stem cells. The new method, described in the journal Stem Cells Translational Medicine , could be used to generate large numbers of muscle cells and muscle progenitors directly from human pluripotent stem cells. Continue reading

Pocket diagnosis: App turns any smartphone into a portable medical diagnostic device

Pocket diagnosis: App turns any smartphone into a portable medical diagnostic device

A recently-developed mobile phone application could make monitoring conditions such as diabetes, kidney disease, and urinary tract infections much clearer and easier for both patients and doctors, and could eventually be used to slow or limit the spread of pandemics in the developing world. Continue reading

Pocket diagnosis: App turns any smartphone into a portable medical diagnostic device

Pocket diagnosis: App turns any smartphone into a portable medical diagnostic device

A recently-developed mobile phone application could make monitoring conditions such as diabetes, kidney disease, and urinary tract infections much clearer and easier for both patients and doctors, and could eventually be used to slow or limit the spread of pandemics in the developing world. Continue reading

Bright future for protein nanoprobes

Bright future for protein nanoprobes

The term a “brighter future” might be a cliché, but in the case of ultra-small probes for lighting up individual proteins, it is now most appropriate. Researchers at the U.S Continue reading

New lens design drastically improves kidney stone treatment

New lens design drastically improves kidney stone treatment

Duke engineers have devised a way to improve the efficiency of lithotripsy — the demolition of kidney stones using focused shock waves. After decades of research, all it took was cutting a groove near the perimeter of the shock wave-focusing lens and changing its curvature. “I’ve spent more than 20 years investigating the physics and engineering aspects of shock wave lithotripsy,” said Pei Zhong, the Anderson-Rupp Professor of Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science at Duke University Continue reading

Nearly half of pregnant low-income women do not want to be sent home from hospital after diagnosis of false or early labor

Nearly half of pregnant low-income women do not want to be sent home from hospital after diagnosis of false or early labor

More than 40 percent of pregnant low-income women discharged from the hospital after a diagnosis of false or early labor did not want to be sent home, with the most common reasons being that they were in too much pain or lived too far away, according to a study by Baylor University’s Louise Herrington School of Nursing (LHSON) and Parkland Health & Hospital System. Continue reading

Bacterial reporters that get the scoop: Engineered gut bacteria ‘remembers’ what it saw

Bacterial reporters that get the scoop: Engineered gut bacteria ‘remembers’ what it saw

It’s a jungle in there. Continue reading

Fighting antibiotic resistance with ‘molecular drill bits’

Fighting antibiotic resistance with ‘molecular drill bits’

In response to drug-resistant “superbugs” that send millions of people to hospitals around the world, scientists are building tiny, “molecular drill bits” that kill bacteria by bursting through their protective cell walls. Continue reading

Potentially safer, greener alternative to BPA could come from papermaking waste

Potentially safer, greener alternative to BPA could come from papermaking waste

A waste product from making paper could yield a safer, greener alternative to the potentially harmful chemical BPA, now banned from baby bottles but still used in many plastics. Scientists made the BPA alternative from lignin, the compound that gives wood its strength, and they say it could be ready for the market within five years. Continue reading

Potentially safer, greener alternative to BPA could come from papermaking waste

Potentially safer, greener alternative to BPA could come from papermaking waste

A waste product from making paper could yield a safer, greener alternative to the potentially harmful chemical BPA, now banned from baby bottles but still used in many plastics. Scientists made the BPA alternative from lignin, the compound that gives wood its strength, and they say it could be ready for the market within five years Continue reading