List/Grid

Laboratory Subscribe to Laboratory

New method to reduce disease-causing inflammation discovered

New method to reduce disease-causing inflammation discovered

Researchers at the University of Georgia report in the Journal of Biological Chemistry that an enzyme known as Tumor Progression Locus 2, or Tpl2, plays a key role in directing and regulating several important components of the body’s immune system. Their discovery may one day lead to new treatments for many common autoimmune diseases. Continue reading

New method to reduce disease-causing inflammation discovered

New method to reduce disease-causing inflammation discovered

Researchers at the University of Georgia report in the Journal of Biological Chemistry that an enzyme known as Tumor Progression Locus 2, or Tpl2, plays a key role in directing and regulating several important components of the body’s immune system. Their discovery may one day lead to new treatments for many common autoimmune diseases. “We know that immune dysfunction plays a serious role in a number of conditions, and we need better methods for controlling chronic inflammation,” said Wendy Watford, assistant professor of infectious diseases in UGA’s College of Veterinary Medicine and principal investigator for the study. Continue reading

Biomarkers predict long-term outcomes in juvenile idiopathic arthritis

Biomarkers predict long-term outcomes in juvenile idiopathic arthritis

Data presented today at the European League Against Rheumatism Annual Congress (EULAR 2014) demonstrate the possibility of using biomarkers (developed from whole blood gene expression profiles) in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) to predict the status of their disease at 12 months. Continue reading

Findings point toward one of first therapies for Lou Gehrig’s disease

Findings point toward one of first therapies for Lou Gehrig’s disease

Researchers have determined that a copper compound known for decades may form the basis for a therapy for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), or Lou Gehrig’s disease. Continue reading

Viral infections, including flu, could be inhibited by naturally occurring protein

Viral infections, including flu, could be inhibited by naturally occurring protein

By boosting a protein that naturally exists in our cells, an international team of researchers led by the University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute (UPCI), partner with UPMC CancerCenter, has found a potential way to enhance our ability to sense and inhibit viral infections. The laboratory-based discovery, which could lead to more effective treatments for viruses ranging from hepatitis C to the flu, appears in the June 19 issue of the journal Immunity Continue reading

Viral infections, including flu, could be inhibited by naturally occurring protein

Viral infections, including flu, could be inhibited by naturally occurring protein

By boosting a protein that naturally exists in our cells, an international team of researchers led by the University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute (UPCI), partner with UPMC CancerCenter, has found a potential way to enhance our ability to sense and inhibit viral infections. The laboratory-based discovery, which could lead to more effective treatments for viruses ranging from hepatitis C to the flu, appears in the June 19 issue of the journal Immunity . The research is supported by the National Institutes of Health. Continue reading

Eye evolution: From dark-light to detailed eyesight

Eye evolution: From dark-light to detailed eyesight

Larvae of the marine bristle worm Platynereis dumerilii orient themselves using light. Early in their development, these larvae swim towards the light to use surface currents for their dispersal. Continue reading

Infection prevention implanted directly into bones

Infection prevention implanted directly into bones

Hospital germs can be fatal, since they are resistant to antibiotics. Continue reading

Malaria-carrying mosquitoes wiped out in lab with genetic method that creates male-only offspring

Malaria-carrying mosquitoes wiped out in lab with genetic method that creates male-only offspring

Scientists have modified mosquitoes to produce sperm that will only create males, pioneering a fresh approach to eradicating malaria. In a study published in the journal Nature Communications , scientists from Imperial College London have tested a new genetic method that distorts the sex ratio of Anopheles gambiae mosquitoes, the main transmitters of the malaria parasite, so that the female mosquitoes that bite and pass the disease to humans are no longer produced. Continue reading

Human stem cells used to create light-sensitive retina in a dish

Human stem cells used to create light-sensitive retina in a dish

Using a type of human stem cell, Johns Hopkins researchers say they have created a three-dimensional complement of human retinal tissue in the laboratory, which notably includes functioning photoreceptor cells capable of responding to light, the first step in the process of converting it into visual images. “We have basically created a miniature human retina in a dish that not only has the architectural organization of the retina but also has the ability to sense light,” says study leader M. Continue reading