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A new quality control pathway in the cell

A new quality control pathway in the cell

Proteins are important building blocks in our cells and each cell contains millions of different protein molecules. They are involved in everything from structural to regulatory aspects in the cell Continue reading

First blood test to diagnose depression in adults

First blood test to diagnose depression in adults

The first blood test to diagnose major depression in adults has been developed by Northwestern Medicine® scientists, a breakthrough approach that provides the first objective, scientific diagnosis for depression. The test identifies depression by measuring the levels of nine RNA blood markers. RNA molecules are the messengers that interpret the DNA genetic code and carry out its instructions. Continue reading

First blood test to diagnose depression in adults

First blood test to diagnose depression in adults

The first blood test to diagnose major depression in adults has been developed by Northwestern Medicine® scientists, a breakthrough approach that provides the first objective, scientific diagnosis for depression. The test identifies depression by measuring the levels of nine RNA blood markers. RNA molecules are the messengers that interpret the DNA genetic code and carry out its instructions. Continue reading

Role of hormone in response to ovarian cancer treatment

Role of hormone in response to ovarian cancer treatment

Researchers at Women & Infants Hospital of Rhode Island recently published the results of an investigation into how we might better tailor therapy for ovarian cancer. The work comes out of the molecular therapeutic laboratory directed by Richard G. Moore, MD, of Women & Infants’ Program in Women’s Oncology. Continue reading

Role of hormone in response to ovarian cancer treatment

Role of hormone in response to ovarian cancer treatment

Researchers at Women & Infants Hospital of Rhode Island recently published the results of an investigation into how we might better tailor therapy for ovarian cancer. Continue reading

Healthy humans make nice homes for viruses

Healthy humans make nice homes for viruses

The same viruses that make us sick can take up residence in and on the human body without provoking a sneeze, cough or other troublesome symptom, according to new research at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis. Continue reading

Healthy humans make nice homes for viruses

Healthy humans make nice homes for viruses

The same viruses that make us sick can take up residence in and on the human body without provoking a sneeze, cough or other troublesome symptom, according to new research at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis. Continue reading

Brain scans used to forecast early reading difficulties

Brain scans used to forecast early reading difficulties

UC San Francisco researchers have used brain scans to predict how young children learn to read, giving clinicians a possible tool to spot children with dyslexia and other reading difficulties before they experience reading challenges. In the United States, children usually learn to read for the first time in kindergarten and become proficient readers by third grade, according to the authors Continue reading

EEG study findings reveal how fear is processed in the brain

EEG study findings reveal how fear is processed in the brain

An estimated 8% of Americans will suffer from post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) at some point during their lifetime. Brought on by an overwhelming or stressful event or events, PTSD is the result of altered chemistry and physiology of the brain Continue reading

EEG study findings reveal how fear is processed in the brain

EEG study findings reveal how fear is processed in the brain

An estimated 8% of Americans will suffer from post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) at some point during their lifetime. Brought on by an overwhelming or stressful event or events, PTSD is the result of altered chemistry and physiology of the brain. Continue reading