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Compact proton therapy for fight against cancer

Compact proton therapy for fight against cancer

The future face of modern-day anti-cancer therapy based on charged particles like protons could potentially involve using laser accelerators. However, these facilities will need to be reduced in terms of both size and cost compared to conventional ones Continue reading

Details of calcium ‘safety-valve’ in cells explained

Details of calcium ‘safety-valve’ in cells explained

Sometimes a cell has to die — when it’s done with its job or inflicted with injury that could otherwise harm an organism. Conversely, cells that refuse to die when expected can lead to cancer. So scientists interested in fighting cancer have been keenly interested in learning the details of “programmed cell death.” They want to understand what happens when this process goes awry and identify new targets for anticancer drugs. Continue reading

Details of calcium ‘safety-valve’ in cells explained

Details of calcium ‘safety-valve’ in cells explained

Sometimes a cell has to die — when it’s done with its job or inflicted with injury that could otherwise harm an organism. Conversely, cells that refuse to die when expected can lead to cancer. So scientists interested in fighting cancer have been keenly interested in learning the details of “programmed cell death.” They want to understand what happens when this process goes awry and identify new targets for anticancer drugs. Continue reading

New targets that could increase effectiveness, reduce side effects in breast cancer treatments

New targets that could increase effectiveness, reduce side effects in breast cancer treatments

Scientists from the Florida campus of The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) have found new targets for potential intervention in breast cancer. Continue reading

Mechanism that forms cell-to-cell catch bonds found by researchers

Mechanism that forms cell-to-cell catch bonds found by researchers

Certain bonds connecting biological cells get stronger when they’re tugged. Those bonds could help keep hearts together and pumping; breakdowns of those bonds could help cancer cells break away and spread. Those bonds are known as catch bonds and they’re formed by common adhesion proteins called cadherins. Continue reading

Why are older women more vulnerable to breast cancer? New clues

Why are older women more vulnerable to breast cancer? New clues

Scientists from the Department of Energy’s Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) have gained more insights into why older women are more susceptible to breast cancer. They found that as women age, the cells responsible for maintaining healthy breast tissue stop responding to their immediate surroundings, including mechanical cues that should prompt them to suppress nearby tumors. Their work sheds light on how aging alters cellular and molecular functions, and how these changes contribute to the prevalence of breast cancer in older women Continue reading

Molecular secret of short, intense workouts clarified

Molecular secret of short, intense workouts clarified

In the last few years, the benefits of short, intense workouts have been extolled by both researchers and exercise fans as something of a metabolic panacea capable of providing greater overall fitness, better blood sugar control and weight reduction — all of it in periods as short as seven minutes a few times a week. Now, in a new study, scientists from the Florida campus of The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) confirm that there is something molecularly unique about intense exercise: the activation of a single protein. Continue reading

Design of self-assembling protein nanomachines starts to click: A nanocage builds itself from engineered components

Design of self-assembling protein nanomachines starts to click: A nanocage builds itself from engineered components

A route for constructing protein nanomachines engineered for specific applications may be closer to reality. Biological systems produce an incredible array of self-assembling, functional protein tools. Continue reading

Hemorrhagic Fevers Can Be Caused by Body’s Antiviral Interferon Response

Hemorrhagic Fevers Can Be Caused by Body’s Antiviral Interferon Response

Hemorrhagic fevers caused by Lassa, dengue and other viruses affect more than one million people annually and are often fatal, yet scientists have never understood why only some virus-infected people come down with the disease and others do not. But now, virologists and immunologists at The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) have found a major clue to the mystery of “hemorrhagic fever” syndromes Continue reading

Hemorrhagic Fevers Can Be Caused by Body’s Antiviral Interferon Response

Hemorrhagic Fevers Can Be Caused by Body’s Antiviral Interferon Response

Hemorrhagic fevers caused by Lassa, dengue and other viruses affect more than one million people annually and are often fatal, yet scientists have never understood why only some virus-infected people come down with the disease and others do not. But now, virologists and immunologists at The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) have found a major clue to the mystery of “hemorrhagic fever” syndromes. In findings reported this week in an Early Edition of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences , the team showed that Interferon Type I (IFN-I) immune proteins are key drivers of a viral syndrome in mice that closely mimics these human hemorrhagic fevers Continue reading