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Sensor in eye could track pressure changes, monitor for glaucoma

Sensor in eye could track pressure changes, monitor for glaucoma

Your eye could someday house its own high-tech information center, tracking important changes and letting you know when it’s time to see an eye doctor. University of Washington engineers have designed a low-power sensor that could be placed permanently in a person’s eye to track hard-to-measure changes in eye pressure. The sensor would be embedded with an artificial lens during cataract surgery and would detect pressure changes instantaneously, then transmit the data wirelessly using radio frequency waves Continue reading

Sensor in eye could track pressure changes, monitor for glaucoma

Sensor in eye could track pressure changes, monitor for glaucoma

Your eye could someday house its own high-tech information center, tracking important changes and letting you know when it’s time to see an eye doctor. Continue reading

Human stem cells used to create light-sensitive retina in a dish

Human stem cells used to create light-sensitive retina in a dish

Using a type of human stem cell, Johns Hopkins researchers say they have created a three-dimensional complement of human retinal tissue in the laboratory, which notably includes functioning photoreceptor cells capable of responding to light, the first step in the process of converting it into visual images. “We have basically created a miniature human retina in a dish that not only has the architectural organization of the retina but also has the ability to sense light,” says study leader M. Continue reading

Ophthalmology studies focus on glaucoma medication adherence

Ophthalmology studies focus on glaucoma medication adherence

Electronic monitoring to measure medication adherence by patients with glaucoma documented that a sizable number of patients did not regularly use the eye drops prescribed to them. Topical medications for glaucoma lower intraocular pressure and can delay or slow the progression of the eye disease. Continue reading

Diets rich in antioxidant resveratrol fail to reduce deaths, heart disease or cancer

Diets rich in antioxidant resveratrol fail to reduce deaths, heart disease or cancer

A study of Italians who consume a diet rich in resveratrol — the compound found in red wine, dark chocolate and berries — finds they live no longer than and are just as likely to develop cardiovascular disease or cancer as those who eat or drink smaller amounts of the antioxidant. “The story of resveratrol turns out to be another case where you get a lot of hype about health benefits that doesn’t stand the test of time,” says Richard D. Continue reading

Age, general health, antidepressant use linked to eye disorders

Age, general health, antidepressant use linked to eye disorders

Abnormal binocular vision, which involves the way eyes work together as a team, increases dramatically as we age, according to research from the University of Waterloo. The study also found a correlation between this condition, general health and antidepressant use. Continue reading

Population of neutrophils in body found by researchers

Population of neutrophils in body found by researchers

Case Western Reserve University researchers have discovered a novel population of neutrophils, which are the body’s infection control workhorses. These cells have an enhanced microbial killing ability and are thereby better able to control infection. Continue reading

Drivers with hemianopia fail to detect pedestrians, study shows

Drivers with hemianopia fail to detect pedestrians, study shows

A diagnosis of hemianopia, or blindness in one half of the visual field in both eyes as the result of strokes, tumors or trauma often means the end of driving. In about half of the states in the United States and in many other countries, driving with hemianopia is prohibited. However, in some countries including Belgium, the Netherlands, the UK, Switzerland and Canada, driving with hemianopia is permitted after passing a specialized road test Continue reading

Altering eye cells may one day restore vision

Altering eye cells may one day restore vision

Jan. 25, 2013 — Doctors may one day treat some forms of blindness by altering the genetic program of the light-sensing cells of the eye, according to scientists at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis. Continue reading

Light shed on complexity of gene therapy for congenital blindness

Light shed on complexity of gene therapy for congenital blindness

Jan. 21, 2013 — Independent clinical trials, including one conducted at the Scheie Eye Institute at the Perelman School of Medicine, have reported safety and efficacy for Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA), a congenital form of blindness caused by mutations in a gene (RPE65) required for recycling vitamin A in the retina. Inherited retinal degenerative diseases were previously considered untreatable and incurable Continue reading