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First implantation of prototype bionic eye with 24 electrodes: ‘All of a sudden I could see a little flash of light’

First implantation of prototype bionic eye with 24 electrodes: ‘All of a sudden I could see a little flash of light’

ScienceDaily (Aug. 31, 2012) — In a major development, Bionic Vision Australia researchers have successfully performed the first implantation of an early prototype bionic eye with 24 electrodes. Ms Dianne Ashworth has profound vision loss due to retinitis pigmentosa, an inherited condition. Continue reading

Breakthrough treatment reduces post-surgical scarring for glaucoma patients

Breakthrough treatment reduces post-surgical scarring for glaucoma patients

ScienceDaily (July 27, 2012) — Scientists at the Singapore Eye Research Institute (SERI) and Nanyang Technological University (NTU) have developed an innovative way to combat post-surgical scarring for glaucoma patients. A clinical trial has shown that the use of a new drug delivery method has resulted in 40 per cent fewer injections needed by glaucoma patients to prevent scarring after surgery Continue reading

Novel therapy may prevent damage to the retina in diabetic eye diseases

Novel therapy may prevent damage to the retina in diabetic eye diseases

ScienceDaily (July 27, 2012) — Researchers at the University of Michigan Kellogg Eye Center have identified a compound that could interrupt the chain of events that cause damage to the retina in diabetic retinopathy. Continue reading

Microneedles target therapeutics to back of the eye

Microneedles target therapeutics to back of the eye

ScienceDaily (July 22, 2012) — Thanks to tiny microneedles, eye doctors may soon have a better way to treat diseases such as macular degeneration that affect tissues in the back of the eye. That could be important as the population ages and develops more eye-related illnesses — and as pharmaceutical companies develop new drugs that otherwise could only be administered by injecting into the eye with a hypodermic needle. For the first time, researchers from the Georgia Institute of Technology and Emory University have demonstrated that microneedles less than a millimeter in length can deliver drug molecules and particles to the eye in an animal model Continue reading

Nanoscale scaffolds and stem cells show promise in cartilage repair

Nanoscale scaffolds and stem cells show promise in cartilage repair

ScienceDaily (July 17, 2012) — Johns Hopkins tissue engineers have used tiny, artificial fiber scaffolds thousands of times smaller than a human hair to help coax stem cells into developing into cartilage, the shock-absorbing lining of elbows and knees that often wears thin from injury or age. Reporting online June 4 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences , investigators produce an important component of cartilage in both laboratory and animal models Continue reading

Early-life exposure to PCE, chemical in drinking water, may affect vision, study finds

Early-life exposure to PCE, chemical in drinking water, may affect vision, study finds

ScienceDaily (July 11, 2012) — Prenatal and early childhood exposure to the chemical solvent tetrachloroethylene (PCE) found in drinking water may be associated with long-term visual impairments, particularly in the area of color discrimination, a new study led by Boston University School of Public Health (BUSPH) researchers has found. The study by epidemiologists and biostatisticians at BUSPH, working with an ophthalmologist from the BU School of Medicine, found that people exposed to higher levels of PCE from gestation through age 5 exhibited poorer color-discrimination abilities than unexposed people Continue reading

Good news for aging eyes: Debilitating eyesight problems on the decline for older Americans

Good news for aging eyes: Debilitating eyesight problems on the decline for older Americans

ScienceDaily (June 28, 2012) — Today’s senior citizens are reporting fewer visual impairment problems than their counterparts from a generation ago, according to a new Northwestern Medicine study. Improved techniques for cataract surgery and a reduction in the prevalence of macular degeneration may be the driving forces behind this change, the researchers said. “From 1984 until 2010, the decrease in visual impairment in those 65 and older was highly statistically significant,” said Angelo P Continue reading

Why does a diet high in DHA improve memory?

Why does a diet high in DHA improve memory?

ScienceDaily (June 28, 2012) — We’ve all heard that eating fish is good for our brains and memory. But what is it about DHA, an omega-3 fatty acid found in fish, that makes our memory sharper? Researchers with the Faculty of Medicine & Dentistry discovered a possible explanation and just published their findings in the peer-reviewed journal Applied Physiology, Nutrition, and Metabolism . Continue reading

Is arm length the reason women need reading glasses sooner than men?

Is arm length the reason women need reading glasses sooner than men?

ScienceDaily (June 23, 2012) — Studies have consistently reported that women require reading glasses or bifocal lenses earlier than men. According to a recent Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science paper, the gender difference is caused by factors other than focusing ability, such as arm length or preferred reading distance, which should be considered when prescribing readers or bifocals Continue reading

New findings on astronaut vision loss

New findings on astronaut vision loss

ScienceDaily (May 30, 2012) — Could vision changes experienced by astronauts be linked to a vitamin B-12 or folate deficiency? While investigating the vision changes recently identified in astronauts, nutritional assessment data showed similarities to symptoms that occur with vitamin deficiencies, according to a new study published in the March edition of The Journal of Nutrition . Continue reading