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New composite material may restore damaged soft tissue

New composite material may restore damaged soft tissue

ScienceDaily (Aug. 1, 2011) — Biomedical engineers at Johns Hopkins have developed a new liquid material that in early experiments in rats and humans shows promise in restoring damaged soft tissue relatively safely and durably Continue reading

Smartphone making your eyes tired? Images placed in front of the screen increase visual discomfort

Smartphone making your eyes tired? Images placed in front of the screen increase visual discomfort

ScienceDaily (July 21, 2011) — Several reports indicate that prolonged viewing of mobile devices and other stereo 3D devices leads to visual discomfort, fatigue and even headaches. According to a new Journal of Vision study, the root cause may be the demand on our eyes to focus on the screen and simultaneously adjust to the distance of the content Continue reading

Smartphone making your eyes tired? Images placed in front of the screen increase visual discomfort

Smartphone making your eyes tired? Images placed in front of the screen increase visual discomfort

ScienceDaily (July 21, 2011) — Several reports indicate that prolonged viewing of mobile devices and other stereo 3D devices leads to visual discomfort, fatigue and even headaches. According to a new Journal of Vision study, the root cause may be the demand on our eyes to focus on the screen and simultaneously adjust to the distance of the content Continue reading

Insight into new drug resistance in hospital microbes

Insight into new drug resistance in hospital microbes

ScienceDaily (July 13, 2011) — Hospitals struggle to prevent the infections that complicate treatment for cancer, joint replacement, heart surgery and other conditions. Hospital-acquired infections are often resistant to multiple antibiotics, leading to approximately 100,000 deaths and more than $30 billion in additional health care costs yearly. New drugs are being developed to combat these infections, but resistance invariably emerges to these last-line drugs Continue reading

Younger age associated with greater treatment response in children with amblyopia

Younger age associated with greater treatment response in children with amblyopia

ScienceDaily (July 12, 2011) — Treatment for amblyopia (commonly known as lazy eye) was associated with better response among younger children (3 to 7 years of age) than older children, according to a meta-analysis of previous studies published Online First in the Archives of Ophthalmology , one of the JAMA / Archives journals. “Evidence that amblyopia treatment is effective in some older children raises the longstanding question of whether or not there is a relationship between age and magnitude of treatment response,” write Jonathan M. Continue reading

Study evaluates eye findings after use of intra-arterial chemotherapy for retinoblastoma

Study evaluates eye findings after use of intra-arterial chemotherapy for retinoblastoma

ScienceDaily (July 12, 2011) — In a study examining eight eyes that were removed following intra-arterial chemotherapy (IAC) for treatment of retinoblastoma (a tumor of the retina of the eye), there was variable response of the tumor to therapy but also evidence of ocular complications, according to a report published Online First by Archives of Ophthalmology , one of the JAMA / Archives journals. Continue reading

More oxygen in eyes of African-Americans may help explain glaucoma risk

More oxygen in eyes of African-Americans may help explain glaucoma risk

ScienceDaily (July 11, 2011) — Measuring oxygen during eye surgery, investigators at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have discovered a reason that may explain why African-Americans have a higher risk of glaucoma than Caucasians. Continue reading

Twin study shows lifestyle, diet can significantly influence  course of macular degeneration

Twin study shows lifestyle, diet can significantly influence course of macular degeneration

ScienceDaily (July 5, 2011) — Eating a diet high in vitamin D, as well as the nutrients betaine and methionine, might help reduce the risk of macular degeneration, according to new research conducted by Tufts Medical Center scientists. Their study of identical twins from the US World War II Twin Registry also found that the more a person smoked, the higher their risk of developing macular degeneration. The study, “Smoking, Dietary Betaine, Methionine, and Vitamin D in Monozygotic Twins with Discordant Macular Degeneration: Epigenetic Implications”published in the journal Ophthalmology on July 1, is the first to look at identical twin pairs in which one twin had early age-related macular degeneration (AMD), and the other had late stage AMD Continue reading

Twin study shows lifestyle, diet can significantly influence  course of macular degeneration

Twin study shows lifestyle, diet can significantly influence course of macular degeneration

ScienceDaily (July 5, 2011) — Eating a diet high in vitamin D, as well as the nutrients betaine and methionine, might help reduce the risk of macular degeneration, according to new research conducted by Tufts Medical Center scientists. Their study of identical twins from the US World War II Twin Registry also found that the more a person smoked, the higher their risk of developing macular degeneration. The study, “Smoking, Dietary Betaine, Methionine, and Vitamin D in Monozygotic Twins with Discordant Macular Degeneration: Epigenetic Implications”published in the journal Ophthalmology on July 1, is the first to look at identical twin pairs in which one twin had early age-related macular degeneration (AMD), and the other had late stage AMD Continue reading

Slow growth of childhood brain tumors linked to genetic process seen in skin moles

Slow growth of childhood brain tumors linked to genetic process seen in skin moles

ScienceDaily (June 23, 2011) — Johns Hopkins researchers have found a likely explanation for the slow growth of the most common childhood brain tumor, pilocytic astrocytoma. Using tests on a new cell-based model of the tumor, they concluded that the initial process of tumor formation switches on a growth-braking tumor-suppressor gene, in a process similar to that seen in skin moles. The findings, published in the June 1 issue of Clinical Cancer Research , could lead to better ways of evaluating and treating pilocytic astrocytomas. Continue reading