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SIDS risks vary by infant age: Bed sharing remains greatest risk factor for sleep related infant deaths

SIDS risks vary by infant age: Bed sharing remains greatest risk factor for sleep related infant deaths

Sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) and other sleep-related causes of infant mortality have several known risk factors, but little is known if these factors change for different age groups. In a new study in the August 2014 Pediatrics, “Sleep Environment Risks for Younger and Older Infants,” published online July 14, researchers studied sleep-related infant deaths from 24 states from 2004-2012 in the case reporting system of the National Center for the Review and Prevention of Child Deaths Continue reading

‘Mississippi Baby’ now has detectable HIV, researchers find

‘Mississippi Baby’ now has detectable HIV, researchers find

The child known as the “Mississippi baby” — an infant seemingly cured of HIV that was reported as a case study of a prolonged remission of HIV infection in The New England Journal of Medicine last fall — now has detectable levels of HIV after more than two years of not taking antiretroviral therapy without evidence of virus, according to the pediatric HIV specialist and researchers involved in the case. “Certainly, this is a disappointing turn of events for this young child, the medical staff involved in the child’s care, and the HIV/AIDS research community,” said NIAID Director Anthony S Continue reading

‘Mississippi Baby’ now has detectable HIV, researchers find

‘Mississippi Baby’ now has detectable HIV, researchers find

The child known as the “Mississippi baby” — an infant seemingly cured of HIV that was reported as a case study of a prolonged remission of HIV infection in The New England Journal of Medicine last fall — now has detectable levels of HIV after more than two years of not taking antiretroviral therapy without evidence of virus, according to the pediatric HIV specialist and researchers involved in the case. “Certainly, this is a disappointing turn of events for this young child, the medical staff involved in the child’s care, and the HIV/AIDS research community,” said NIAID Director Anthony S Continue reading

Biochemical cascade causes bone marrow inflammation, leading to serious blood disorders

Biochemical cascade causes bone marrow inflammation, leading to serious blood disorders

Like a line of falling dominos, a cascade of molecular events in the bone marrow produces high levels of inflammation that disrupt normal blood formation and lead to potentially deadly disorders including leukemia, an Indiana University-led research team has reported. The discovery, published by the journal Cell Stem Cell , points the way to potential new strategies to treat the blood disorders and further illuminates the relationship between inflammation and cancer, said lead investigator Nadia Carlesso, M.D., Ph.D., associate professor of pediatrics at the Indiana University School of Medicine. Continue reading

First comprehensive pediatric concussion guidelines available now

First comprehensive pediatric concussion guidelines available now

Pediatric emergency medicine researchers at the Children’s Hospital of Eastern Ontario (CHEO) together with the Ontario Neurotrauma Foundation (ONF) today launch the first comprehensive pediatric concussion guidelines. Continue reading

Growth Hormone Treatment for Children May Exacerbate Feelings of Depression

Growth Hormone Treatment for Children May Exacerbate Feelings of Depression

Short, otherwise healthy children who are treated with growth hormone (GH) may become taller, but they may also become more depressed and withdrawn over time, compared to children the same age and height who are not treated with GH, a new study finds. The results were presented in a poster Monday, June 23 at ICE/ENDO 2014, the joint meeting of the International Society of Endocrinology and the Endocrine Society in Chicago. Continue reading

Young indoor tanning increases early risk of skin cancer

Young indoor tanning increases early risk of skin cancer

Dartmouth researchers have found that early exposure to the ultraviolet radiation lamps used for indoor tanning is related to an increased risk of developing basal cell carcinomas (BCC) at a young age. Their findings are reported in “Early-Onset Basal Cell Carcinoma and Indoor Tanning: A Population-Based Study,” a study that will be published in the July 2014 issue of Pediatrics . Since indoor tanning has become increasingly popular among adolescents and young adults, this research calls attention to the importance of counseling young people about the risk of indoor tanning Continue reading

Sleep education program spurs preschoolers to snooze 30 minutes longer at night

Sleep education program spurs preschoolers to snooze 30 minutes longer at night

Taking part in an educational sleep program resulted in a 30-minute average increase in sleep duration at a one-month follow-up for preschoolers, according to a new study from the University of Michigan. In the study, published in the journal SLEEP , families in two Head Start programs participated in the Sweet Dreamzzz Early Childhood Sleep Education Program™ Continue reading

Family violence leaves genetic imprint on children

Family violence leaves genetic imprint on children

A new Tulane University School of Medicine study finds that the more fractured families are by domestic violence or trauma, the more likely that children will bear the scars down to their DNA. Researchers discovered that children in homes affected by domestic violence, suicide or the incarceration of a family member have significantly shorter telomeres, which is a cellular marker of aging, than those in stable households. The findings are published online in the latest issue of the journal Pediatrics Continue reading

Single dose of century-old drug approved for sleeping sickness reverses autism-like symptoms in mice

Single dose of century-old drug approved for sleeping sickness reverses autism-like symptoms in mice

In a further test of a novel theory that suggests autism is the consequence of abnormal cell communication, researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine report that an almost century-old drug approved for treating sleeping sickness also restores normal cellular signaling in a mouse model of autism, reversing symptoms of the neurological disorder in animals that were the human biological age equivalent of 30 years old. The findings, published in the June 17, 2014 online issue of Translational Psychiatry , follow up on similar research published last year by senior author Robert K. Continue reading