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Novel stapled peptide nanoparticle combination prevents RSV infection, study finds

Novel stapled peptide nanoparticle combination prevents RSV infection, study finds

New therapies are needed to prevent and treat respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) — a potentially lethal respiratory infection that can severely affect infants, young children and the elderly. Despite a wide range of anti-RSV efforts, there are no vaccines or drugs on the market to effectively prevent or treat the infection. Now researchers at the Dana-Farber/Boston Children’s Cancer and Blood Disorders Center and Harvard Medical School in Boston, MA, and the James A. Continue reading

Young dads at high risk of depression, too

Young dads at high risk of depression, too

Depression can hit young fathers hard — with symptoms increasing dramatically during some of the most important years of their children’s lives, a new Northwestern Medicine® study has found. Continue reading

Young dads at high risk of depression, too

Young dads at high risk of depression, too

Depression can hit young fathers hard — with symptoms increasing dramatically during some of the most important years of their children’s lives, a new Northwestern Medicine® study has found. Continue reading

Severe obesity on the rise among children in the U.S.

Severe obesity on the rise among children in the U.S.

A new study led by a University of North Carolina School of Medicine researcher finds little to cheer about in the fight against childhood obesity, despite a recent report to the contrary. The study, published online first April 7 in JAMA Pediatrics , found that all classes of obesity in U.S. children have increased over the last 14 years. Continue reading

Severe obesity on the rise among children in the U.S.

Severe obesity on the rise among children in the U.S.

A new study led by a University of North Carolina School of Medicine researcher finds little to cheer about in the fight against childhood obesity, despite a recent report to the contrary. The study, published online first April 7 in JAMA Pediatrics , found that all classes of obesity in U.S. Continue reading

Parental obesity and autism risk in the child: Is paternal obesity a greater risk factor than maternal obesity?

Parental obesity and autism risk in the child: Is paternal obesity a greater risk factor than maternal obesity?

Several studies have looked at possible links between maternal obesity during pregnancy and the risk of developmental disorders in the child. However, paternal obesity could be a greater risk factor than maternal obesity, according to a new study from the Norwegian Institute of Public Health. As the first researcher to study the role of paternal obesity in autism, Dr. Continue reading

Potential drug targets in deadly pediatric brain tumors

Potential drug targets in deadly pediatric brain tumors

Researchers studying a rare, always fatal brain tumor in children have found several molecular alterations that drive the cancer, according to a new study from scientists at Dana-Farber/Boston Children’s Cancer and Blood Disorders Center and McGill University. The findings identify potential new targets for drug treatments. The new research could help physicians choose targeted agents with a better chance of combating pediatric high-grade astrocytomas, which are extremely difficult to treat with radiation and surgery Continue reading

Call for circumcision gets a boost from experts

Call for circumcision gets a boost from experts

In the United States the rate of circumcision in men has increased to 81% over the past decade. In an important new study just published in advance in Mayo Clinic Proceedings authors from Australia and the United States have shown that the benefits of infant male circumcision to health exceed the risks by over 100 to 1. Brian Morris, Professor Emeritus in the School of Medical Sciences at the University of Sydney and his colleagues in Florida and Minnesota found that over their lifetime half of uncircumcised males will contract an adverse medical condition caused by their foreskin. Continue reading

Brawn matters: Stronger adolescents, teens have less risk of diabetes, heart disease

Brawn matters: Stronger adolescents, teens have less risk of diabetes, heart disease

Adolescents with stronger muscles have a lower risk of heart disease and diabetes, according to a new study that examined the influence of muscle strength in sixth grade boys and girls. Continue reading

TV linked to poor snacking habits, cardiovascular risk in middle schoolers

TV linked to poor snacking habits, cardiovascular risk in middle schoolers

Middle school kids who park themselves in front of the TV for two hours or more each day are more likely to consume junk food and have risk factors for cardiovascular disease, even compared to those who spend an equal amount of time on the computer or playing video games, according to research to be presented at the American College of Cardiology’s 63rd Annual Scientific Session. Continue reading