List/Grid

general Subscribe to general

Described novel regulator of protein inactive in over 50 percent of human tumors

Described novel regulator of protein inactive in over 50 percent of human tumors

Researchers at the Bellvitge Biomedical Research Institute (IDIBELL) and the University of Barcelona have discovered the interaction between HERC2 proteins with another protein called p53 that is inactivated in more than half of human tumors. The study results were published in the Journal of Biological Chemistry. Regulation of the activity of p53 by HERC2 The team of José Luis Rosa, at the growth factors and cell differentiation research group at IDIBELL studies the molecular mechanisms of HERC family proteins. Continue reading

Described novel regulator of protein inactive in over 50 percent of human tumors

Described novel regulator of protein inactive in over 50 percent of human tumors

Researchers at the Bellvitge Biomedical Research Institute (IDIBELL) and the University of Barcelona have discovered the interaction between HERC2 proteins with another protein called p53 that is inactivated in more than half of human tumors. The study results were published in the Journal of Biological Chemistry. Continue reading

Diagnostic criteria for Christianson Syndrome

Diagnostic criteria for Christianson Syndrome

Because the severe autism-like condition Christianson Syndrome was only first reported in 1999 and some symptoms take more than a decade to appear, families and doctors urgently need fundamental information about it. Continue reading

Diagnostic criteria for Christianson Syndrome

Diagnostic criteria for Christianson Syndrome

Because the severe autism-like condition Christianson Syndrome was only first reported in 1999 and some symptoms take more than a decade to appear, families and doctors urgently need fundamental information about it. Continue reading

‘Pain-patch’ warning to patients

‘Pain-patch’ warning to patients

unable to retrieve full-text contentPatients using patches containing potent painkillers are being urged to ensure they are thrown away carefully. Continue reading

New technique maps life’s effects on our DNA: Powerful single-cell technique to study environmental effects on DNA

New technique maps life’s effects on our DNA: Powerful single-cell technique to study environmental effects on DNA

Researchers at the BBSRC-funded Babraham Institute, in collaboration with the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute Single Cell Genomics Centre, have developed a powerful new single-cell technique to help investigate how the environment affects our development and the traits we inherit from our parents. Continue reading

Genetic cause of common breast tumors found

Genetic cause of common breast tumors found

A multi-disciplinary team of scientists from the National Cancer Centre Singapore, Duke-NUS Graduate Medical School Singapore, and Singapore General Hospital have made a major breakthrough in understanding the molecular basis of fibroadenoma, one of the most common breast tumors diagnosed in women. Continue reading

Metabolic enzyme stops progression of most common type of kidney cancer

Metabolic enzyme stops progression of most common type of kidney cancer

In an analysis of small molecules called metabolites used by the body to make fuel in normal and cancerous cells in human kidney tissue, a research team from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania identified an enzyme key to applying the brakes on tumor growth. Continue reading

Scientists map one of most important proteins in life — and cancer

Scientists map one of most important proteins in life — and cancer

Scientists reveal the structure of one of the most important and complicated proteins in cell division — a fundamental process in life and the development of cancer — in research published in Nature . Continue reading

New HIV prevention recommendations combine biomedical, behavioral approaches

New HIV prevention recommendations combine biomedical, behavioral approaches

In an innovative approach to HIV prevention, an interdisciplinary group of experts has come together for the first time to lay out a framework of best practices to optimize the role of the clinician in achieving an AIDS-free generation. The guidelines, which will be published online in the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) , integrate both cutting-edge biomedical advances and evidence-based behavioral interventions for the care of people living with HIV or at high risk for HIV infection. The recommendations, developed by an expert volunteer panel assembled by the International Antiviral (formerly AIDS) Society-USA (IAS-USA), are intended as guidelines for clinicians to implement a combined biomedical-behavioral approach to HIV care and prevention. Continue reading