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Two oncogenes linked to agressiveness and incidence of leukemia in mice

Two oncogenes linked to agressiveness and incidence of leukemia in mice

Proteins regulating cell division determine tumour growth. Continue reading

Drinking decaf or regular coffee maybe good for the liver

Drinking decaf or regular coffee maybe good for the liver

Researchers from the National Cancer Institute report that decaffeinated coffee drinking may benefit liver health. Results of the study published in Hepatology, a journal of the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases, show that higher coffee consumption, regardless of caffeine content, was linked to lower levels of abnormal liver enzymes. This suggests that chemical compounds in coffee other than caffeine may help protect the liver Continue reading

Mortality risk of overweight, obesity similar for blacks, whites

Mortality risk of overweight, obesity similar for blacks, whites

A study from American Cancer Society researchers finds the increased risk of premature death associated with a higher body mass index (BMI) is similar for African Americans and whites, in contrast to previous, smaller studies that indicated the association may be weaker for African Americans. Continue reading

Indian government health insurance reduced mortality among poor

Indian government health insurance reduced mortality among poor

A government program to provide health insurance for catastrophic illness to households below the poverty line in Karnataka, lowered both mortality rates and out-of-pocket expenses for the residents, according to a recent evaluation published in the leading global health journal The BMJ . Continue reading

Epigenetic changes caused by binge drinking: Overconsumption of alcohol triggers inflammatory response in the liver

Epigenetic changes caused by binge drinking: Overconsumption of alcohol triggers inflammatory response in the liver

Researchers at the University of Missouri School of Medicine have identified epigenetic protein changes caused by binge drinking, a discovery that could lead to treatments for alcohol-related liver diseases. “We know that chronic alcohol use is damaging to the liver, but binge drinking amplifies that damage,” said Shivendra Shukla, PhD, Margaret Proctor Mulligan Professor at the MU School of Medicine and lead author of the study. Excessive alcohol use is one of the most common causes of chronic liver failure. Continue reading

Fundamental theory about education of immune police questioned by researchers

Fundamental theory about education of immune police questioned by researchers

A fundamental theory about how our thymus educates our immune police appears to be wrong, scientists say. It’s known that stem cells come out of the bone marrow and travel to the tiny thymus gland behind the breastbone to learn to become one of two CD4T cell types: one leads an attack, the other keeps the peace. One widely held concept of why they become one or the other is that, despite coming from the same neighborhood and going to the same school, they are exposed to different things in the thymus, said Dr. Continue reading

Potential link between breast cancer genes, salivary gland cancer

Potential link between breast cancer genes, salivary gland cancer

The risk of developing cancer in a salivary gland might be higher in people with mutations in either of two genes associated with breast and ovarian cancer, according to a new study by researchers at The Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center — Arthur G. James Cancer Hospital and Richard J. Solove Research Institute (OSUCCC — James) Continue reading

Survival molecule helps cancer cells hide from the immune system

Survival molecule helps cancer cells hide from the immune system

A molecule that helps cancer cells evade programmed self-destruction, an internal source of death, might also help malignant cells hide from the immune system, an external source of death. A new study by researchers at The Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center — Arthur G. James Cancer Hospital and Richard J Continue reading

New at-risk group identified for gastrointestinal stromal tumors

New at-risk group identified for gastrointestinal stromal tumors

Researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine have, for the first time, clearly defined the epidemiology of gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST), which occur primarily in the lining of the stomach and small intestine. One key finding: Patients of Asian descent, who have not previously been identified as an at-risk population, are 1.5 times more likely than other patient groups to be diagnosed with this type of tumor. Results of the study were published this week in Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention , a journal of the American Association for Cancer Research. Continue reading

New ‘lab-on-a-chip’ could revolutionize early diagnosis of cancer

New ‘lab-on-a-chip’ could revolutionize early diagnosis of cancer

Scientists have been laboring to detect cancer and a host of other diseases in people using promising new biomarkers called “exosomes.” Indeed, Popular Science magazine named exosome-based cancer diagnostics one of the 20 breakthroughs that will shape the world this year. Exosomes could lead to less invasive, earlier detection of cancer, and sharply boost patients’ odds of survival Continue reading