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Microfluidic device with artificial arteries measures drugs’ influence on blood clotting

Microfluidic device with artificial arteries measures drugs’ influence on blood clotting

A new microfluidic method for evaluating drugs commonly used for preventing heart attacks has found that while aspirin can prevent dangerous blood clots in some at-risk patients, it may not be effective in all patients with narrowed arteries. The study, which involved 14 human subjects, used a device that simulated blood flowing through narrowed coronary arteries to assess effects of anti-clotting drugs. Continue reading

Cholesterol transporter structure decoded

Cholesterol transporter structure decoded

The word “cholesterol” is directly linked in most people’s minds with high-fat foods, worrying blood test results, and cardiovascular diseases. However, despite its bad reputation, cholesterol is essential to our wellbeing: It stabilizes cell membranes and is a raw material for the production of different hormones in the cell’s power plants — the mitochondria Continue reading

Cholesterol transporter structure decoded

Cholesterol transporter structure decoded

The word “cholesterol” is directly linked in most people’s minds with high-fat foods, worrying blood test results, and cardiovascular diseases. However, despite its bad reputation, cholesterol is essential to our wellbeing: It stabilizes cell membranes and is a raw material for the production of different hormones in the cell’s power plants — the mitochondria Continue reading

New approach makes cancer cells explode

New approach makes cancer cells explode

Researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden have discovered that a substance called Vacquinol-1 makes cells from glioblastoma, the most aggressive type of brain tumour, literally explode. When mice were given the substance, which can be given in tablet form, tumour growth was reversed and survival was prolonged. The findings are published in the journal Cell. Continue reading

Scientists ‘herd’ cells in new approach to tissue engineering

Scientists ‘herd’ cells in new approach to tissue engineering

Sometimes it only takes a quick jolt of electricity to get a swarm of cells moving in the right direction. Researchers at UC Berkeley found that an electrical current can be used to orchestrate the flow of a group of cells, an achievement that could establish the basis for more controlled forms of tissue engineering and for potential applications such as “smart bandages” that use electrical stimulation to help heal wounds. In the experiments, described in a study published this week in the journal Nature Materials , the researchers used single layers of epithelial cells, the type of cells that bind together to form robust sheathes in skin, kidneys, cornea and other organs. Continue reading

Steroids help reverse rapid bone loss tied to rib fractures

Steroids help reverse rapid bone loss tied to rib fractures

Feb. 5, 2013 — New research in animals triggered by a combination of serendipity and counterintuitive thinking could point the way to treating fractures caused by rapid bone loss in people, including patients with metastatic cancers. A series of studies at the University of North Carolina School of Medicine found that steroid drugs, known for inducing bone loss with prolonged use, actually help suppress a molecule that’s key to the rapid bone loss process. Continue reading

Scientists identify culprit in obesity-associated high blood pressure

Scientists identify culprit in obesity-associated high blood pressure

Jan. 31, 2013 — Researchers have described a key mechanism responsible for the  brain’s regulation of obesity-associated disease. Obesity and its related conditions such as type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease and stroke are among the most challenging of today’s healthcare concerns Continue reading

Link found between insulin sensitivity, cells’ powerhouses: Mice with mitochondrial mutation live longer, have less fat

Link found between insulin sensitivity, cells’ powerhouses: Mice with mitochondrial mutation live longer, have less fat

Jan. 28, 2013 — If findings of a new study in mice are any indication, it might be possible to fine-tune cellular powerhouses called mitochondria, tweaking one aspect to increase insulin sensitivity, reduce body and fat mass, and even extend life. Exploiting this target could one day lead to novel treatments for type 2 diabetes — an endocrine system disease that affects 8 percent of the U.S. Continue reading

Could the timing of when you eat, be just as important as what you eat?

Could the timing of when you eat, be just as important as what you eat?

Jan. 29, 2013 — Most weight-loss plans center around a balance between caloric intake and energy expenditure. However, new research has shed light on a new factor that is necessary to shed pounds: timing. Continue reading

Genes provide clues to gender disparity in human hearts

Genes provide clues to gender disparity in human hearts

Jan. Continue reading