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Intertwined evolution of human brain and brawn

Intertwined evolution of human brain and brawn

The cognitive differences between humans and our closest living cousins, the chimpanzees, are staggeringly obvious. Although we share strong superficial physical similarities, we have been able to use our incredible mental abilities to construct civilisations and manipulate our environment to our will, allowing us to take over our planet and walk on the moon while the chimps grub around in a few remaining African forests. But a new study suggests that human muscle may be just as unique Continue reading

‘Virtual human’ shows that stiff arteries can explain cause of high blood pressure

‘Virtual human’ shows that stiff arteries can explain cause of high blood pressure

High blood pressure is highly age-related and affects more than 1 billion people worldwide. But doctors can’t fully explain the cause of 90 per cent of all cases. Continue reading

‘Virtual human’ shows that stiff arteries can explain cause of high blood pressure

‘Virtual human’ shows that stiff arteries can explain cause of high blood pressure

High blood pressure is highly age-related and affects more than 1 billion people worldwide. But doctors can’t fully explain the cause of 90 per cent of all cases. Continue reading

A better way to treat ACE inhibitor angioedema in the ED

A better way to treat ACE inhibitor angioedema in the ED

Investigators at the University of Cincinnati have found a safe and effective treatment for life-threatening angioedema attacks in the emergency department. In angioedema, patients experience a rapid swelling of the skin and subcutaneous tissues — which, in some cases, can lead to airway obstruction and suffocation. Continue reading

Scientists investigate the role of the ‘silent killer’ inside deep-diving animals

Scientists investigate the role of the ‘silent killer’ inside deep-diving animals

With its imperceptible features, carbon monoxide is widely known as the “silent killer” due to its risks at lethal concentrations. Far less known is that carbon monoxide is produced naturally in small quantities in humans and animals, and in recent years medical researchers have evaluated the gas as a treatment for diabetes, heart attacks, sepsis, and other illnesses Continue reading

How cone snail venom minimizes pain

How cone snail venom minimizes pain

The venom from marine cone snails, used to immobilize prey, contains numerous peptides called conotoxins, some of which can act as painkillers in mammals. A recent study in The Journal of General Physiology provides new insight into the mechanisms by which one conotoxin, Vc1.1, inhibits pain. The findings help explain the analgesic powers of this naturally occurring toxin and could eventually lead to the development of synthetic forms of Vc1.1 to treat certain types of neuropathic pain in humans. Continue reading

Role of calcium in familial Alzheimer’s disease clarified, pointing to new therapeutics

Role of calcium in familial Alzheimer’s disease clarified, pointing to new therapeutics

In 2008 researchers at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania showed that mutations in two proteins associated with familial Alzheimer’s disease (FAD) disrupt the flow of calcium ions within neurons. Continue reading

Association between small-vessel disease, Alzheimer pathology studied

Association between small-vessel disease, Alzheimer pathology studied

Cerebral small-vessel disease (SVD) and Alzheimer disease (AD) pathology appear to be associated. Continue reading

Patients with atrial fibrillation at higher risk of developing dementia when meds are out of range

Patients with atrial fibrillation at higher risk of developing dementia when meds are out of range

A new study by researchers at the Intermountain Medical Center Heart Institute in Salt Lake City has found that atrial fibrillation patients who are on blood thinning medications are at higher risk of developing dementia if their doses are not in the optimal recommended range. The study of more than 2,600 AFib patients found they are significantly more likely to develop dementia when using medicines to prevent blood clots, such as warfarin, when their dosing is too high or too low for an extended period of time. Continue reading

Patients with atrial fibrillation at higher risk of developing dementia when meds are out of range

Patients with atrial fibrillation at higher risk of developing dementia when meds are out of range

A new study by researchers at the Intermountain Medical Center Heart Institute in Salt Lake City has found that atrial fibrillation patients who are on blood thinning medications are at higher risk of developing dementia if their doses are not in the optimal recommended range. The study of more than 2,600 AFib patients found they are significantly more likely to develop dementia when using medicines to prevent blood clots, such as warfarin, when their dosing is too high or too low for an extended period of time. Continue reading