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New optimal screening threshold for gestational diabetes in twin pregnancies: Ideal 1-hour 50-g glucose challenge test cutoff ≥135 mg/dl

New optimal screening threshold for gestational diabetes in twin pregnancies: Ideal 1-hour 50-g glucose challenge test cutoff ≥135 mg/dl

A common complication, gestational diabetes affects approximately 6-7% of pregnant women. Currently, screening is done in two steps to help identify patients most at risk; however, the suggested levels for additional testing were based on singleton pregnancy data Continue reading

Heart’s own immune cells can help it heal

Heart’s own immune cells can help it heal

The heart holds its own pool of immune cells capable of helping it heal after injury, according to new research in mice at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis. Most of the time when the heart is injured, these beneficial immune cells are supplanted by immune cells from the bone marrow, which are spurred to converge in the heart and cause inflammation that leads to further damage. Continue reading

Hygienic funerals, better protection for health workers offer best chance to stop Ebola

Hygienic funerals, better protection for health workers offer best chance to stop Ebola

Hygienic funeral practices, case isolation, contact tracing with quarantines, and better protection for health care workers are the keys to stopping the Ebola epidemic that continues to expand in West Africa, researchers said today in a new report in the journal Science . Continuing the status quo of intervention efforts that were in place as of Sept. 19 would allow continued expansion of the epidemic by about 224 new cases daily in Liberia by Dec. Continue reading

High-intensity sound waves may aid regenerative medicine

High-intensity sound waves may aid regenerative medicine

Researchers at the University of Washington have developed a way to use sound to create cellular scaffolding for tissue engineering, a unique approach that could help overcome one of regenerative medicine’s significant obstacles. The researchers will present their technique at the 168th meeting of the Acoustical Society of America (ASA), held October 27-31, 2014, at the Indianapolis Marriott Downtown Hotel Continue reading

What do American babies eat? A lot depends on Mom’s socioeconomic background

What do American babies eat? A lot depends on Mom’s socioeconomic background

You have to be at least 2 years old to be covered by U.S. dietary guidelines. Continue reading

Young adults ages 18 to 26 should be viewed as separate subpopulation in policy, research

Young adults ages 18 to 26 should be viewed as separate subpopulation in policy, research

Young adults ages 18-26 should be viewed as a separate subpopulation in policy and research, because they are in a critical period of development when successes or failures could strongly affect the trajectories of their lives, says a new report from the Institute of Medicine and National Research Council. The committee that wrote the report found that young adults’ brains and behaviors continue maturing into their 20s, and they face greater challenges achieving independence than their predecessors did, have lengthened pathways into adulthood, and are surprisingly unhealthy. The report calls for an improved understanding and response to the circumstances and needs of today’s young adults. Continue reading

Case study: Hearing loss in one infant twin affects mother’s speech to both babies

Case study: Hearing loss in one infant twin affects mother’s speech to both babies

Is it possible that hearing loss in one infant from a pair of twins can affect the mother’s speech to both infants? A new acoustics study zeroes in on this question and suggests that not only is this alteration of speech entirely possible, but that mothers speak to both infants as if they are hearing impaired. The study explores the acoustic characteristics of three mothers’ speech towards their infant twins. Continue reading

Innovative study utilizing video games shows sleep apnea may affect memory of everyday events

Innovative study utilizing video games shows sleep apnea may affect memory of everyday events

Sleep apnea may affect your ability to form new spatial memories, such as remembering where you parked your car, new research led by NYU Langone Medical Center sleep specialists suggests. The study, published online Oct. 29 in Journal of Neuroscience , demonstrates through the playing of a specific video game that disruption of rapid eye movement (REM) sleep as a consequence of sleep apnea impairs spatial memory in humans even when other sleep stages are intact Continue reading

Low carb, high fat diets may reduce seizures in tough-to-treat epilepsy

Low carb, high fat diets may reduce seizures in tough-to-treat epilepsy

Diets high in fat and low in carbohydrates, such as the ketogenic or modified Atkins diet, may reduce seizures in adults with tough-to-treat epilepsy, according to a review of the research published in the October 29, 2014, online issue of Neurology ®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. Epilepsy is a nervous system disorder in which the nerve cells in the brain work abnormally, causing seizures. About 50 million people have epilepsy worldwide, according to the World Health Organization. Continue reading

Scientists generate first human stomach tissue in lab with stem cells

Scientists generate first human stomach tissue in lab with stem cells

Scientists used pluripotent stem cells to generate functional, three-dimensional human stomach tissue in a laboratory — creating an unprecedented tool for researching the development and diseases of an organ central to several public health crises, ranging from cancer to diabetes. Scientists at Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center report Oct. 29 in Nature they used human pluripotent stem cells — which can become any cell type in the body — to grow a miniature version of the stomach Continue reading