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Diagnostic criteria for Christianson Syndrome

Diagnostic criteria for Christianson Syndrome

Because the severe autism-like condition Christianson Syndrome was only first reported in 1999 and some symptoms take more than a decade to appear, families and doctors urgently need fundamental information about it. Continue reading

Diagnostic criteria for Christianson Syndrome

Diagnostic criteria for Christianson Syndrome

Because the severe autism-like condition Christianson Syndrome was only first reported in 1999 and some symptoms take more than a decade to appear, families and doctors urgently need fundamental information about it. Continue reading

Genetic risk for autism stems mostly from common genes

Genetic risk for autism stems mostly from common genes

Using new statistical tools, Carnegie Mellon University’s Kathryn Roeder has led an international team of researchers to discover that most of the genetic risk for autism comes from versions of genes that are common in the population rather than from rare variants or spontaneous glitches. Published in the July 20 issue of the journal Nature Genetics , the study found that about 52 percent of autism was traced to common genes and rarely inherited variations, with spontaneous mutations contributing a modest 2.6 percent of the total risk Continue reading

Genetic cause of common breast tumors found

Genetic cause of common breast tumors found

A multi-disciplinary team of scientists from the National Cancer Centre Singapore, Duke-NUS Graduate Medical School Singapore, and Singapore General Hospital have made a major breakthrough in understanding the molecular basis of fibroadenoma, one of the most common breast tumors diagnosed in women. Continue reading

Metabolic enzyme stops progression of most common type of kidney cancer

Metabolic enzyme stops progression of most common type of kidney cancer

In an analysis of small molecules called metabolites used by the body to make fuel in normal and cancerous cells in human kidney tissue, a research team from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania identified an enzyme key to applying the brakes on tumor growth. Continue reading

Offering option of initial HIV care at home increases use of antiretroviral therapy

Offering option of initial HIV care at home increases use of antiretroviral therapy

LSTM Researchers found that offering adults in Malawi optional home initiation of care following HIV self-testing resulted in a significant increase in the proportion of adults initiating antiretroviral therapy (ART) compared with standard HIV care. The results are part of a study that was funded by the Wellcome Trust and published in the July 23/30 issue of JAMA , which is HIV/AIDS themed and released early to coincide with the International AIDS Conference taking place in Melbourne, Australia next week. In 2012 it was estimated that 35 million people worldwide were living with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Continue reading

Combination treatment for hep C associated with favorable response among HIV patients

Combination treatment for hep C associated with favorable response among HIV patients

HIV-infected patients also infected with hepatitis C virus (HCV) who received a combination of the medications sofosbuvir plus ribavirin had high rates of sustained HCV virologic response 12 weeks after cessation of therapy, according to a study in the July 23/30 issue of JAMA , a theme issue on HIV/AIDS. The issue is being released early to coincide with the International AIDS Conference Continue reading

New trigger for ovulation could make IVF safer

New trigger for ovulation could make IVF safer

Researchers have successfully used a new and potentially safer method to stimulate ovulation in women undergoing IVF treatment. Twelve babies have been born after their mothers were given an injection of the natural hormone kisspeptin to make their eggs mature. Doctors normally administer another hormone, hCG, for this purpose, but in some women, there is a risk that this can overstimulate the ovaries, with potentially life-threatening consequences. Continue reading

New trigger for ovulation could make IVF safer

New trigger for ovulation could make IVF safer

Researchers have successfully used a new and potentially safer method to stimulate ovulation in women undergoing IVF treatment. Twelve babies have been born after their mothers were given an injection of the natural hormone kisspeptin to make their eggs mature. Doctors normally administer another hormone, hCG, for this purpose, but in some women, there is a risk that this can overstimulate the ovaries, with potentially life-threatening consequences. Continue reading

High-dose fluticasone effective against eosinophilic esophagitis, study shows

High-dose fluticasone effective against eosinophilic esophagitis, study shows

Results from a clinical trial show that high doses of the corticosteroid fluticasone propionate safely and effectively induce remission in many people with eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE), a chronic inflammatory disease of the esophagus characterized by high levels of white blood cells called eosinophils. However, some trial participants did not respond to fluticasone even after six months of high-dose treatments, providing evidence that certain people with EoE are steroid-resistant. Continue reading