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Fertility preservation option for young boys with cancer

Fertility preservation option for young boys with cancer

Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center is one of a few centers in the world — and the only one in North Carolina — offering young boys with cancer the opportunity to participate in a research study focused on fertility preservation and restoration. The research, conducted by the Medical Center’s Wake Forest Institute for Regenerative Medicine (WFIRM) under the direction of Anthony Atala, M.D., institute director, gives boys who have a high risk of becoming sterile the option to “bank” a small piece of testicular tissue prior to treatment. Continue reading

FDG-PET/CT shows promise for breast cancer patients younger than 40

FDG-PET/CT shows promise for breast cancer patients younger than 40

Researchers at Memorial Sloan Kettering found that PET/CT imaging of patients younger than 40 who were initially diagnosed with stage I-III breast cancer resulted in change of diagnosis. As reported in the October issue of The Journal of Nuclear Medicine , while guidelines recommend FDG-PET/CT imaging only for women with stage III breast cancer, it can also help physicians more accurately diagnose young breast cancer patients initially diagnosed with earlier stages of the disease. Continue reading

Paint on ‘smart’ bandage emits phosphorescent glow for healing below

Paint on ‘smart’ bandage emits phosphorescent glow for healing below

Inspired by a desire to help wounded soldiers, an international, multidisciplinary team of researchers led by Assistant Professor Conor L. Evans at the Wellman Center for Photomedicine of Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) and Harvard Medical School (HMS) has created a paint-on, see-through, “smart” bandage that glows to indicate a wound’s tissue oxygenation concentration Continue reading

Study uncovers important process for immune system development

Study uncovers important process for immune system development

Research by UC Irvine immunologists reveals new information about how our immune system functions, shedding light on a vital process that determines how the body’s ability to fight infection develops. In the online version of Nature Immunology , neurology professor Dr. Continue reading

Memory loss associated with Alzheimer’s reversed: Small trial succeeds using systems approach to memory disorders

Memory loss associated with Alzheimer’s reversed: Small trial succeeds using systems approach to memory disorders

Patient one had two years of progressive memory loss. She was considering quitting her job, which involved analyzing data and writing reports, she got disoriented driving, and mixed up the names of her pets. Continue reading

High-speed drug screen developed

High-speed drug screen developed

MIT engineers have devised a way to rapidly test hundreds of different drug-delivery vehicles in living animals, making it easier to discover promising new ways to deliver a class of drugs called biologics, which includes antibodies, peptides, RNA, and DNA, to human patients. In a study appearing in the journal Integrative Biology , the researchers used this technology to identify materials that can efficiently deliver RNA to zebrafish and also to rodents. This type of high-speed screen could help overcome one of the major bottlenecks in developing disease treatments based on biologics: It is challenging to find safe and effective ways to deliver them Continue reading

Medications are main culprit of allergic deaths in U.S., comprehensive study finds

Medications are main culprit of allergic deaths in U.S., comprehensive study finds

Medications are the leading cause of allergy-related sudden deaths in the U.S., according to an analysis of death certificates from 1999 to 2010, conducted by researchers at Montefiore Medical Center and Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University. The study, published online today in the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology , also found that the risk of fatal drug-induced allergic reactions was particularly high among older people and African-Americans and that such deaths increased significantly in the U.S. in recent years Continue reading

A heartbeat away? Hybrid ‘patch’ could replace transplants

A heartbeat away? Hybrid ‘patch’ could replace transplants

Because heart cells cannot multiply and cardiac muscles contain few stem cells, heart tissue is unable to repair itself after a heart attack. Now Tel Aviv University researchers are literally setting a new gold standard in cardiac tissue engineering Continue reading

Potential biomarker to detect SCID (severe combined immunodeficiency)

Potential biomarker to detect SCID (severe combined immunodeficiency)

A genetic disease called SCID, short for severe combined immunodeficiency, forces patients to breathe filtered air and avoid human contact because their bodies’ natural defenses are too weak to fight germs. Although it affects fewer than 2,000 new births each year worldwide, SCID is a cousin to acquired immune deficiency syndrome triggered by a human immunodeficiency virus — HIV/AIDS Continue reading

Bacteria may have ability to reduce impact of diazepam on UK river environments

Bacteria may have ability to reduce impact of diazepam on UK river environments

The natural photo degradation of diazepam (valium) and similar medicines — followed by bacterial breakdown — may reduce their potentially harmful impact on the UK’s freshwater environment, a team of researchers has said. Diazepam — used to treat anxiety and other similar conditions — has been detected in rivers across the UK and Europe, having been released from waste water treatment plants Continue reading