List/Grid

Collection Subscribe to Collection

Causes of death shifting in people with HIV

Causes of death shifting in people with HIV

HIV-positive adults in high income countries face a substantially reduced risk of death from AIDS-related causes, cardiovascular disease, and liver disease compared with a decade ago, according to a large international study published in The Lancet. The study which involved nearly 50,000 HIV-positive adults receiving care and antiretroviral therapy (ART) at more than 200 clinics across Europe, USA, and Australia found that overall death rates have almost halved since 1999, while deaths due to AIDS-related causes and cardiovascular disease have declined by around 65% and liver-related deaths by more than 50%. Although deaths from most causes declined over the study period, there was no reduction in death rates from non-AIDS cancers which remained stable over time (1.6 deaths per 1000 years 1999-2000 to 2.1 in 2009-2011) Continue reading

Four Lessons for Effective, Efficient Research in Health Care Settings

Four Lessons for Effective, Efficient Research in Health Care Settings

Thousands of studies take place every year in healthcare settings. A report published recently in the American Journal of Preventative Medicine describes how to do many of these studies more rapidly. By taking into account the real-world constraints of the systems in which providers deliver care and patients receive it, researchers can help speed results, cut costs, and increase chances that recommendations from their findings will be implemented. Continue reading

Equations reveal rebellious rhythms at the heart of nature

Equations reveal rebellious rhythms at the heart of nature

Physicists are using equations to reveal the hidden complexities of the human body. Continue reading

Growing use of complex therapies for heart rhythm abnormalities

Growing use of complex therapies for heart rhythm abnormalities

The EHRA (European Heart Rhythm Association) White Book 2014 will be officially launched at the CARDIOSTIM EHRA EUROPACE 2014 congress which starts today in Nice, France. Continue reading

Could ‘fragile Y hypothesis’ explain chromosome loss?

Could ‘fragile Y hypothesis’ explain chromosome loss?

A UT Arlington research team says their study of genetic information from more than 4,000 beetle species has yielded a new theory about why some species lose their Y chromosome and others, such as humans, hang on to it. They call it the “fragile Y hypothesis.” The biologists’ idea is that the fate of the Y chromosome is heavily influenced by how meiosis, or the production of sperm, works in an organism Continue reading

Involving a genetic health care professional may improve quality, reduce unnecessary testing

Involving a genetic health care professional may improve quality, reduce unnecessary testing

A new Moffitt Cancer Center study published Thursday in Genetics in Medicine shows that counseling from a genetic health care provider before genetic testing educates patients and may help reduce unnecessary procedures. Up to 10 percent of cancers are inherited, meaning a person was born with an abnormal gene that increases their risk for cancer Continue reading

Involving a genetic health care professional may improve quality, reduce unnecessary testing

Involving a genetic health care professional may improve quality, reduce unnecessary testing

A new Moffitt Cancer Center study published Thursday in Genetics in Medicine shows that counseling from a genetic health care provider before genetic testing educates patients and may help reduce unnecessary procedures. Continue reading

Alcohol abuse damage in neurons at a molecular scale identified for first time

Alcohol abuse damage in neurons at a molecular scale identified for first time

Joint research between the University of the Basque Country (UPV/EHU) and the University of Nottingham has identified, for the first time, the structural damage caused at a molecular level to the brain by the chronic excessive abuse of alcohol. Continue reading

Why are older women more vulnerable to breast cancer? New clues

Why are older women more vulnerable to breast cancer? New clues

Scientists from the Department of Energy’s Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) have gained more insights into why older women are more susceptible to breast cancer. They found that as women age, the cells responsible for maintaining healthy breast tissue stop responding to their immediate surroundings, including mechanical cues that should prompt them to suppress nearby tumors. Their work sheds light on how aging alters cellular and molecular functions, and how these changes contribute to the prevalence of breast cancer in older women Continue reading

‘Virtual human’ shows that stiff arteries can explain cause of high blood pressure

‘Virtual human’ shows that stiff arteries can explain cause of high blood pressure

High blood pressure is highly age-related and affects more than 1 billion people worldwide. But doctors can’t fully explain the cause of 90 per cent of all cases. Continue reading