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Outcome of stroke worse for people with infection

Outcome of stroke worse for people with infection

Infection is bad news for all of us — but it can be really serious to people who have had a stroke. Evidence is mounting that infection makes things much worse after a stroke. A team of scientists at the University of Manchester has now found a key to why and how infection is such a bad thing for stroke sufferers. Continue reading

Online registry to drive brain disease research

Online registry to drive brain disease research

A new online project led by researchers at UC San Francisco promises to dramatically cut the time and cost of conducting clinical trials for brain diseases, while also helping scientists analyze and track the brain functions of thousands of volunteers over time. With easy online registration, the Brain Health Registry is designed to create a ready pool of research subjects for studies on neurological diseases, such as Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s, as well as depression, post-traumatic stress disorder and many other brain ailments. Continue reading

Light-activated neurons from stem cells restore function to paralyzed muscles

Light-activated neurons from stem cells restore function to paralyzed muscles

A new way to artificially control muscles using light, with the potential to restore function to muscles paralyzed by conditions such as motor neuron disease and spinal cord injury, has been developed by scientists at UCL and King’s College London. The technique involves transplanting specially-designed motor neurons created from stem cells into injured nerve branches Continue reading

Patient stem cells help identify common problem in ALS

Patient stem cells help identify common problem in ALS

Harvard stem cell scientists have discovered that a recently approved medication for epilepsy may possibly be a meaningful treatment for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) — Lou Gehrig’s disease, a uniformly fatal neurodegenerative disorder. The researchers are now collaborating with Massachusetts General Hospital to design an initial clinical trial testing the safety of the treatment in ALS patients. The investigators all caution that a great deal needs to be done to assure the safety and efficacy of the treatment in ALS patients, before physicians should start offering it Continue reading

Morning rays keep off pounds

Morning rays keep off pounds

A surprising new strategy for managing your weight? Bright morning light. A new Northwestern Medicine® study reports the timing, intensity and duration of your light exposure during the day is linked to your weight — the first time this has been shown. Continue reading

Consistent blood pressure control may cut rate of second stroke in half

Consistent blood pressure control may cut rate of second stroke in half

Stroke survivors who consistently control their blood pressure may reduce the likelihood of a second stroke by more than half, according to new research in the American Heart Association journal Stroke . For the study, researchers analyzed the results from the Vitamin Intervention for Stroke Prevention (VISP) trial, which enrolled 3,680 ischemic stroke patients ages 35 and older in 1996-2003. Continue reading

Blood-brain barrier repair after stroke may prevent chronic brain deficits

Blood-brain barrier repair after stroke may prevent chronic brain deficits

Following ischemic stroke, the integrity of the blood-brain barrier (BBB), which prevents harmful substances such as inflammatory molecules from entering the brain, can be impaired in cerebral areas distant from initial ischemic insult. This disruptive condition, known as diaschisis, can lead to chronic post-stroke deficits, University of South Florida researchers report. In experiments using laboratory rats modeling ischemic stroke, USF investigators studied the consequences of the compromised BBB at the chronic post-stroke stage. Continue reading

Surprising new way to kill cancer cells

Surprising new way to kill cancer cells

Northwestern Medicine scientists have demonstrated that cancer cells — and not normal cells — can be killed by eliminating either the FAS receptor, also known as CD95, or its binding component, CD95 ligand. “The discovery seems counterintuitive because CD95 has previously been defined as a tumor suppressor,” said lead investigator Marcus Peter, professor in medicine-hematology/Oncology at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine. “But when we removed it from cancer cells, rather than proliferate, they died.” The findings were published March 20 in Cell Reports Continue reading

U.S. headache sufferers get $1 billion worth of brain scans each year

U.S. headache sufferers get $1 billion worth of brain scans each year

One in eight visits to a a doctor for a headache or migraine end up with the patient going for a brain scan, at a total cost of about $1 billion a year, a new University of Michigan Medical School study finds. Continue reading

One in three children with MS has cognitive impairment

One in three children with MS has cognitive impairment

Feb. 5, 2013 — Data from the largest multicenter study accessing cognitive functioning in children with multiple sclerosis (MS) reveals that one-third of these patients have cognitive impairment, according to a research paper published in the Journal of Child Neurology. Led by Lauren B Continue reading