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Barriers to obtaining gene expression profiling test heightened perceived value

Barriers to obtaining gene expression profiling test heightened perceived value

Barriers to obtaining gene expression profiling tests heightened their perceived importance among patients with early breast cancer who were deciding whether to have chemotherapy, a new study says. Gene expression profiling tests, such as Oncotype Dx, analyze the patterns of 21 different genes within cancer cells to help predict how likely it is that a women’s cancer will recur within 10 years after initial treatment and how beneficial chemotherapy will be to her. Dr Continue reading

Involving a genetic health care professional may improve quality, reduce unnecessary testing

Involving a genetic health care professional may improve quality, reduce unnecessary testing

A new Moffitt Cancer Center study published Thursday in Genetics in Medicine shows that counseling from a genetic health care provider before genetic testing educates patients and may help reduce unnecessary procedures. Up to 10 percent of cancers are inherited, meaning a person was born with an abnormal gene that increases their risk for cancer Continue reading

Involving a genetic health care professional may improve quality, reduce unnecessary testing

Involving a genetic health care professional may improve quality, reduce unnecessary testing

A new Moffitt Cancer Center study published Thursday in Genetics in Medicine shows that counseling from a genetic health care provider before genetic testing educates patients and may help reduce unnecessary procedures. Continue reading

Compact proton therapy for fight against cancer

Compact proton therapy for fight against cancer

The future face of modern-day anti-cancer therapy based on charged particles like protons could potentially involve using laser accelerators. However, these facilities will need to be reduced in terms of both size and cost compared to conventional ones Continue reading

Short nanotubes target pancreatic cancer

Short nanotubes target pancreatic cancer

Short, customized carbon nanotubes have the potential to deliver drugs to pancreatic cancer cells and destroy them from within, according to researchers at Rice University and the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center. Pristine nanotubes produced through a new process developed at Rice can be modified to carry drugs to tumors through gaps in blood-vessel walls that larger particles cannot fit through Continue reading

New therapy for pancreatic cancer patients shows promising results

New therapy for pancreatic cancer patients shows promising results

A clinical trial conducted by researchers at the Virginia G. Piper Cancer Center Clinical Trials, a partnership between Scottsdale Healthcare and the Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen), showed that a new drug called MM-398, given in combination with 5-flourouracil (5FU) and leucovorin, produced a significant overall survival rate in patients with advanced, previously-treated pancreatic cancer. The NAPOLI-1 (NAnoliPOsomaL Irinotecan) Phase 3 study — a final confirmation of a drug’s safety and effectiveness — was conducted among patients with metastatic pancreatic cancer who previously received gemcitibine, which has been the standard-of-care therapy for such patients Continue reading

Race could be a factor in head, neck cancer survival rates

Race could be a factor in head, neck cancer survival rates

The national survival rates for African-Americans diagnosed with head and neck cancer have not improved in the last 40 years despite advances in the treatment and management of the disease, University of Missouri School of Medicine researchers have found in a new study. More than 52,000 men and women in the United States currently are living with head and neck cancer. Using data from the National Cancer Institute’s Surveillance, epidemiology and end results (SEER) program, MU researchers under the guidance of Mosharraf Hossain, MD, assistant professor in the MU School of Medicine’s Division of Hematology and Oncology and physician with Ellis Fischel Cancer Center in Columbia, Mo., studied the survival trend of five ethnic groups over the last 40 years Continue reading

Moving toward quality patient-centered care at cancer hospital

Moving toward quality patient-centered care at cancer hospital

In order to meet new cancer program accreditation standards, institutions have placed new focus on patient navigation, psychosocial distress screening, and survivorship care plans. Recently published research by the George Washington University (GW) Cancer Institute found these new programs are experiencing “growing pains.” The results of a nationwide survey conducted by the GW Cancer Institute and reviewed in the Journal of Oncology Navigation and Survivorship , found that health care professionals could most benefit from greater evaluation of their program’s impact Continue reading

Moving toward quality patient-centered care at cancer hospital

Moving toward quality patient-centered care at cancer hospital

In order to meet new cancer program accreditation standards, institutions have placed new focus on patient navigation, psychosocial distress screening, and survivorship care plans. Recently published research by the George Washington University (GW) Cancer Institute found these new programs are experiencing “growing pains.” The results of a nationwide survey conducted by the GW Cancer Institute and reviewed in the Journal of Oncology Navigation and Survivorship , found that health care professionals could most benefit from greater evaluation of their program’s impact. “This national study from GW Cancer Institute’s Center for the Advancement of Cancer Survivorship, Navigation and Policy provides insights into current approaches and barriers for patient-centered care in practice,” said Mandi Pratt-Chapman, M.A., director of the GW Cancer Institute Continue reading

Worry, behavior among teens at higher risk for breast cancer: Focus of new study

Worry, behavior among teens at higher risk for breast cancer: Focus of new study

Teenage girls with a familial or genetic risk for breast cancer worry more about getting the disease, even when their mother has no history, compared to girls their age with no known high risks, according to new data presented today by researchers from Penn Medicine’s Abramson Cancer Center at the annual meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) in Chicago. Early analyses suggest that such worry may increase risk behavior, such as smoking and potentially alcohol use, but does not appear to influence positive behavior, such as exercise. Continue reading