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Tumor registry data find acadiana colon cancer rates among America’s highest

Tumor registry data find acadiana colon cancer rates among America’s highest

A special study using data from LSU Health New Orleans School of Public Health’s Louisiana Tumor Registry has found that colorectal cancer incidence rates in the Louisiana Acadian parishes are among the highest in the United States. This study appears to be the first to identify a high rate of cancer in a large, regional, US founder population, raising the possibility of a genetic predisposition. Continue reading

Tumor registry data find acadiana colon cancer rates among America’s highest

Tumor registry data find acadiana colon cancer rates among America’s highest

A special study using data from LSU Health New Orleans School of Public Health’s Louisiana Tumor Registry has found that colorectal cancer incidence rates in the Louisiana Acadian parishes are among the highest in the United States. This study appears to be the first to identify a high rate of cancer in a large, regional, US founder population, raising the possibility of a genetic predisposition. Alternatively, an unidentified, robust environmental risk factor may be present. Continue reading

New meningitis vaccine only cost-effective at low price

New meningitis vaccine only cost-effective at low price

Bexsero is the first vaccine to broadly protect against meningitis B disease, but research now suggests the Government would need to negotiate a considerable reduction in the £75 list price in order to provide the same value for money as other programmes in the NHS. In March 2014, the Joint Committee on Vaccination and Immunisation (JCVI), the independent expert group that advises UK governments on vaccination, recommended that Bexsero be offered to babies at two, four and 12 months of age as long as the Department of Health can obtain the vaccine at a cost-effective price Continue reading

College athletes in contact sports more likely to carry MRSA, study finds

College athletes in contact sports more likely to carry MRSA, study finds

Even if they don’t show signs of infection, college athletes who play football, soccer and other contact sports are more likely to carry the superbug methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), suggests a study on MRSA and athletes, which is being presented at IDWeek 2014™. This puts them at higher risk for infection and increases the likelihood of spreading the bug, which can cause serious and even fatal infections. The study is the first to observe college athletes who are not part of a larger MRSA outbreak Continue reading

Effect of antibiotic susceptibility for patients with bloodstream infection

Effect of antibiotic susceptibility for patients with bloodstream infection

In an analysis of more than 8,000 episodes of Staphylococcus aureus bloodstream infections, there were no significant differences in the risk of death when comparing patients exhibiting less susceptibility to the antibiotic vancomycin to patients with more vancomycin susceptible strains of S. Continue reading

Cellular ‘power grid’ failure triggers abnormal heart rhythms after a heart attack

Cellular ‘power grid’ failure triggers abnormal heart rhythms after a heart attack

Heart attack survivors often experience dangerous heart rhythm disturbances during treatment designed to restore blood flow to the injured heart muscle, a common and confounding complication of an otherwise lifesaving intervention. Now a duo of Johns Hopkins researchers working with rat heart cells have shown that such post-heart attack arrhythmias are likely triggered by something akin to a power grid failure inside the injured cardiac cells. This power failure, the team found, is caused by disruption to the cells’ mitochondria — the tiny powerhouses that fuel all cell life — when they become destabilized during the “resuscitation” period after a heart attack and trigger chaotic cell-to-cell signaling that interferes with the heart’s entire electrical network Continue reading

Investigation into GI scope-related infections changes national guidelines

Investigation into GI scope-related infections changes national guidelines

National guidelines for the cleaning of certain gastrointestinal (GI) scopes are likely to be updated due to findings from UPMC’s infection prevention team. Continue reading

Programs to improve hand hygiene reduced infections, increased compliance

Programs to improve hand hygiene reduced infections, increased compliance

UPMC Presbyterian Hospital’s infection prevention teams have improved hand washing and sanitizing compliance at the hospital to nearly 100 percent among clinical staff through accountability and educational measures. In a separate effort at UPMC Mercy Hospital, rates of a deadly infection were reduced by educating patients about hand hygiene. Continue reading

Coastal living boosts physical activity, study shows

Coastal living boosts physical activity, study shows

People who live close to the coast are more likely to meet physical activity guidelines than inland dwellers, finds a new study released today. The research involved participants from across England and describes a particularly noticeable effect on western — but unexpectedly not eastern — coasts of the nation. Continue reading

Drug-infused nanoparticle is right for sore eyes

Drug-infused nanoparticle is right for sore eyes

For the millions of sufferers of dry eye syndrome, their only recourse to easing the painful condition is to use drug-laced eye drops three times a day. Now, researchers from the University of Waterloo have developed a topical solution containing nanoparticles that will combat dry eye syndrome with only one application a week. The eye drops progressively deliver the right amount of drug-infused nanoparticles to the surface of the eyeball over a period of five days before the body absorbs them. Continue reading