List/Grid

Medicine Subscribe to Medicine

Human milk fat improves growth in premature infants

Human milk fat improves growth in premature infants

For premature infants, adequate growth while in the neonatal intensive care unit is an indicator of better long-term health and developmental outcomes. Researchers at the USDA/ARS Children’s Nutrition Research Center at Baylor College of Medicine and Texas Children’s Hospital have now successfully incorporated a cream supplement into premature infants’ diets that improved their growth outcomes in the NICU. Continue reading

Previous pulmonary disease linked to increased lung cancer risk in large study

Previous pulmonary disease linked to increased lung cancer risk in large study

Links between a number of common respiratory diseases and an increased risk of developing lung cancer have been found in a large pooled analysis of seven studies involving more than 25,000 individuals. “Associations between various respiratory diseases and lung cancer have been shown in earlier studies, but few of these studies considered multiple respiratory diseases simultaneously,” said researcher Ann Olsson, PhD, of the International Agency for Research in Cancer in Lyon, France Continue reading

Previous pulmonary disease linked to increased lung cancer risk in large study

Previous pulmonary disease linked to increased lung cancer risk in large study

Links between a number of common respiratory diseases and an increased risk of developing lung cancer have been found in a large pooled analysis of seven studies involving more than 25,000 individuals. “Associations between various respiratory diseases and lung cancer have been shown in earlier studies, but few of these studies considered multiple respiratory diseases simultaneously,” said researcher Ann Olsson, PhD, of the International Agency for Research in Cancer in Lyon, France. “In our pooled analysis of seven case-control studies involving more than 12,500 cases and 14,900 controls, we found associations between lung cancer and chronic bronchitis, emphysema, and pneumonia, with a greater increased lung cancer risk among subjects with all three of these conditions.” The findings were published in the American Thoracic Society’s American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine Continue reading

Ebola outbreak highlights global disparities in health-care resources

Ebola outbreak highlights global disparities in health-care resources

The outbreak of Ebola virus disease that has claimed more than 1,000 lives in West Africa this year poses a serious, ongoing threat to that region: the spread to capital cities and Nigeria — Africa’s most populous nation — presents new challenges for healthcare professionals. The situation has garnered significant attention and fear around the world, but proven public health measures and sharpened clinical vigilance will contain the epidemic and thwart a global spread, according to a new commentary by Anthony S. Fauci, M.D., director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), part of the National Institutes of Health. Continue reading

Novel treatment strengthens bones in genetic disease neurofibromatosis type-1

Novel treatment strengthens bones in genetic disease neurofibromatosis type-1

An enzyme therapy may prevent skeletal abnormalities associated with the genetic disorder neurofibromatosis type-1, Vanderbilt investigators have discovered. The researchers demonstrated in a mouse model of the disorder that the enzyme asfotase-alpha improves bone growth, mineralization and strength. Continue reading

Study details shortage of replication in education research

Study details shortage of replication in education research

Although replicating important findings is essential for helping education research improve its usefulness to policymakers and practitioners, less than one percent of the articles published in the top education research journals are replication studies, according to new research published today in Educational Researcher ( ER ), a peer-reviewed journal of the American Educational Research Association. “Facts Are More Important Than Novelty: Replication in the Education Sciences,” by Matthew C. Continue reading

Study details shortage of replication in education research

Study details shortage of replication in education research

Although replicating important findings is essential for helping education research improve its usefulness to policymakers and practitioners, less than one percent of the articles published in the top education research journals are replication studies, according to new research published today in Educational Researcher ( ER ), a peer-reviewed journal of the American Educational Research Association. “Facts Are More Important Than Novelty: Replication in the Education Sciences,” by Matthew C. Makel of Duke University and Jonathan A. Continue reading

Newborns’ genetic code sends infection distress signal

Newborns’ genetic code sends infection distress signal

Babies suffering from life-threatening bacterial infections such as sepsis could benefit from improved treatment, thanks to a ground-breaking study. For the first time, researchers have been able to detect and decode a signal generated from a baby’s DNA that can tell doctors whether or not a bacterial infection is present in the bloodstream. Continue reading

Newborns’ genetic code sends infection distress signal

Newborns’ genetic code sends infection distress signal

Babies suffering from life-threatening bacterial infections such as sepsis could benefit from improved treatment, thanks to a ground-breaking study. For the first time, researchers have been able to detect and decode a signal generated from a baby’s DNA that can tell doctors whether or not a bacterial infection is present in the bloodstream. Continue reading

Tissue development ‘roadmap’ created to guide stem cell medicine

Tissue development ‘roadmap’ created to guide stem cell medicine

In a boon to stem cell research and regenerative medicine, scientists at Boston Children’s Hospital, the Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering at Harvard University and Boston University have created a computer algorithm called CellNet as a “roadmap” for cell and tissue engineering, to ensure that cells engineered in the lab have the same favorable properties as cells in our own bodies. Continue reading