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Ultraviolet light-induced mutation drives many skin cancers, researchers find

Ultraviolet light-induced mutation drives many skin cancers, researchers find

A genetic mutation caused by ultraviolet light is likely the driving force behind millions of human skin cancers, according to researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine. Continue reading

Why age reduces stem cells’ ability to repair muscle

Why age reduces stem cells’ ability to repair muscle

As we age, stem cells throughout our bodies gradually lose their capacity to repair damage, even from normal wear and tear. Continue reading

Each day in hospital raises risk of multidrug-resistant infection

Each day in hospital raises risk of multidrug-resistant infection

If a patient contracts an infection while in the hospital, each day of hospitalization increases by 1% the likelihood that the infection will be multidrug-resistant, according to research presented at the 54th Interscience Conference on Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy (ICAAC) an infectious disease meeting of the American Society for Microbiology. Researchers from the Medical University of South Carolina gathered and analyzed historical data from 949 documented cases of Gram-negative infection at their academic medical center Continue reading

New antifungal as effective as existing drugs with fewer adverse events

New antifungal as effective as existing drugs with fewer adverse events

A newly developed antifungal, isavuconazole, is as effective as an existing drug, voriconazole, against invasive mold disease in cancer patients with less adverse effects, according to phase 3 clinical data presented at the 54th Interscience Conference on Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy, an infectious disease meeting of the American Society for Microbiology. Continue reading

Researchers discover key to making new muscles

Researchers discover key to making new muscles

Researchers at Sanford-Burnham Medical Research Institute (Sanford-Burnham) have developed a novel technique to promote tissue repair in damaged muscles. Continue reading

Platelet-like particles augment natural blood clotting for treating trauma

Platelet-like particles augment natural blood clotting for treating trauma

A new class of synthetic platelet-like particles could augment natural blood clotting for the emergency treatment of traumatic injuries — and potentially offer doctors a new option for curbing surgical bleeding and addressing certain blood clotting disorders without the need for transfusions of natural platelets. The clotting particles, which are based on soft and deformable hydrogel materials, are triggered by the same factor that initiates the body’s own clotting processes Continue reading

Breast cancer specialist reports advance in treatment of triple-negative breast cancer

Breast cancer specialist reports advance in treatment of triple-negative breast cancer

William M. Sikov, a medical oncologist in the Breast Health Center and associate director for clinical research in the Program in Women’s Oncology at Women & Infants Hospital of Rhode Island, served as study chair and lead author for a recently-published major national study that could lead to improvements in outcomes for women with triple-negative breast cancer, an aggressive form of the disease that disproportionately affects younger women. “Impact of the Addition of Carboplatin and/or Bevacizumab to Neoadjuvant Once-Per-Week Paclitaxel Followed by Dose-Dense Doxorubicin and Cyclophosphamide on Pathologic Complete Response Rates in Stage II to III Triple-Negative Breast Cancer: CALGB 40603 (Alliance)” was accepted as a rapid publication and published online this month by the Journal of Clinical Oncology Continue reading

When offering someone a job hurts more than it helps

When offering someone a job hurts more than it helps

New Vanderbilt research finds that unsolicited job leads can increase symptoms of depression in some people. Continue reading

Disease in a dish approach could aid Huntington’s disease discovery

Disease in a dish approach could aid Huntington’s disease discovery

Creating induced pluripotent stem cells or iPS cells allows researchers to establish “disease in a dish” models of conditions ranging from Alzheimer’s disease to diabetes. Scientists at Yerkes National Primate Research Center, Emory University have now applied the technology to a model of Huntington’s disease (HD) in transgenic nonhuman primates, allowing them to conveniently assess the efficacy of potential therapies on neuronal cells in the laboratory. Continue reading

Novel immunotherapy vaccine decreases recurrence in HER2 positive breast cancer patients

Novel immunotherapy vaccine decreases recurrence in HER2 positive breast cancer patients

A new breast cancer vaccine candidate, (GP2), provides further evidence of the potential of immunotherapy in preventing disease recurrence. This is especially the case for high-risk patients when it is combined with a powerful immunotherapy drug. These findings are being presented by The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center at the 2014 American Society of Clinical Oncology’s Breast Cancer Symposium in San Francisco Continue reading