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Neck manipulation may be associated with stroke

Neck manipulation may be associated with stroke

Manipulating the neck has been associated with cervical dissection, a type of arterial tear that can lead to stroke. Continue reading

New Treatment Successful for Rare, Disabling Movement Disorder, the Mal de Debarquement Syndrome (MdDS)

New Treatment Successful for Rare, Disabling Movement Disorder, the Mal de Debarquement Syndrome (MdDS)

People who suffer from a rare illness, the Mal de Debarquement Syndrome (MdDS), now have a chance for full recovery thanks to treatment developed by researchers at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai. Their findings were published online in the July issue of Frontiers in Neurology. People often feel a sensation of movement, called Mal de Debarquement, after they have finished boating, surfing or a sea voyage. Continue reading

Cell signaling pathway linked to obesity, type 2 diabetes

Cell signaling pathway linked to obesity, type 2 diabetes

A Purdue University study shows that Notch signaling, a key biological pathway tied to development and cell communication, also plays an important role in the onset of obesity and Type 2 diabetes, a discovery that offers new targets for treatment. A research team led by Shihuan Kuang, associate professor of animal sciences, found that blocking Notch signaling in the fat tissue of mice caused white fat cells to transform into a “leaner” type of fat known as beige fat. Continue reading

Elderly with depression, mild cognitive impairment more vulnerable to accelerated brain aging

Elderly with depression, mild cognitive impairment more vulnerable to accelerated brain aging

People who develop depression and mild cognitive impairment (MCI) after age 65 are more likely to have biological and brain imaging markers that reflect a greater vulnerability for accelerated brain aging, according to a study conducted by researchers at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine. The findings were published online in Molecular Psychiatry . Continue reading

Gut microbes browse along gene buffet

Gut microbes browse along gene buffet

In the moist, dark microbial rainforest of the intestine, hundreds of species of microorganisms interact with each other and with the cells of the host animal to get the resources they need to survive and thrive. Though there’s a lot of competition in this vibrant ecosystem, collaboration is valued too. A new study on the crosstalk between microbes and cells lining the gut of mice shows just how cooperative this environment can be Continue reading

Growing human GI cells may lead to personalized treatments

Growing human GI cells may lead to personalized treatments

A method of growing human cells from tissue removed from a patient’s gastrointestinal (GI) tract eventually may help scientists develop tailor-made therapies for inflammatory bowel disease and other GI conditions. Reporting online recently in the journal Gut , researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis said they have made cell lines from individual patients in as little as two weeks. Continue reading

Powerful new system for classifying tumors revealed

Powerful new system for classifying tumors revealed

Cancers are classified primarily on the basis of where in the body the disease originates, as in lung cancer or breast cancer. According to a new study, however, one in ten cancer patients would be classified differently using a new classification system based on molecular subtypes instead of the current tissue-of-origin system. Continue reading

Dramatic growth of grafted stem cells in rat spinal cord

Dramatic growth of grafted stem cells in rat spinal cord

Building upon previous research, scientists at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine and Veteran’s Affairs San Diego Healthcare System report that neurons derived from human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC) and grafted into rats after a spinal cord injury produced cells with tens of thousands of axons extending virtually the entire length of the animals’ central nervous system. Writing in the August 7 early online edition of Neuron , lead scientist Paul Lu, PhD, of the UC San Diego Department of Neurosciences and colleagues said the human iPSC-derived axons extended through the white matter of the injury sites, frequently penetrating adjacent gray matter to form synapses with rat neurons. Continue reading

Gene increases risk of breast cancer to one in three by age 70

Gene increases risk of breast cancer to one in three by age 70

Breast cancer risks for one of potentially the most important genes associated with breast cancer after the BRCA1/2 genes are today reported in the New England Journal of Medicine . Continue reading

Nasal test developed for to diagnose Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease

Nasal test developed for to diagnose Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease

A nasal brush test can rapidly and accurately diagnose Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD), an incurable and ultimately fatal neurodegenerative disorder, according to a study by National Institutes of Health (NIH) scientists and their Italian colleagues. Continue reading