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Chemical derived from broccoli sprouts shows promise in treating autism

Chemical derived from broccoli sprouts shows promise in treating autism

Results of a small clinical trial suggest that a chemical derived from broccoli sprouts — and best known for claims that it can help prevent certain cancers — may ease classic behavioral symptoms in those with autism spectrum disorders (ASDs). The study, a joint effort by scientists at MassGeneral Hospital for Children and the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, involved 40 teenage boys and young men, ages 13 to 27, with moderate to severe autism. In a report published online in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences during the week of Oct Continue reading

An end to needle phobia: Device could make painless injections possible

An end to needle phobia: Device could make painless injections possible

Imagine no tears during infant vaccines and no fear of the needle for those old enough to know what’s coming. Such painless injections could be possible with a device that applies pressure and vibration while the needle is inserted in the skin, according to a study presented at the ANESTHESIOLOGY™ 2014 annual meeting Continue reading

New cancer drug to begin trials in multiple myeloma patients

New cancer drug to begin trials in multiple myeloma patients

Scientists at Imperial College London have developed a new cancer drug which they plan to trial in multiple myeloma patients by the end of next year. In a paper published today in the journal Cancer Cell , the researchers report how the drug, known as DTP3, kills myeloma cells in laboratory tests in human cells and mice, without causing any toxic side effects, which is the main problem with most other cancer drugs. The new drug works by stopping a key process that allows cancer cells to multiply Continue reading

Research findings could pave way for a fructose tolerance test

Research findings could pave way for a fructose tolerance test

Increased consumption of table sugar and high-fructose corn syrup has been linked to rising rates of obesity and type 2 diabetes in the United States and throughout the world. Both sweeteners are commonly found in processed foods and sugar-sweetened beverages, and both are made up of nearly equal amounts of two basic sugars, glucose and fructose. The effects of glucose ingestion in humans are well understood, in part, because they are easily assessed by performing a Glucose Tolerance Test, which measures serum glucose levels after glucose ingestion and has become the diagnostic cornerstone for modern diabetes care Continue reading

Suicide and gender roles: Reporting distorts reality

Suicide and gender roles: Reporting distorts reality

Men angry and rejected, women sociable and mentally ill — a current study by the MedUni Vienna demonstrates that these gender stereotypes prevail when Austrian daily newspapers report on suicide. This has far-reaching consequences. Continue reading

Ebola’s deadly toll on healthcare workers

Ebola’s deadly toll on healthcare workers

Since its first outbreak in Guinea in December, 2013, Ebola has hit West African healthcare providers disproportionately hard. Hundreds of healthcare workers have been infected, many of whom have died, according to the World Health Organization Continue reading

Chewing gum while fasting before surgery is safe, study finds

Chewing gum while fasting before surgery is safe, study finds

It is well known that patients should avoid eating and drinking before surgery to help prevent complications while under anesthesia. But is it safe to chew gum? Continue reading

Oral capsule as effective as invasive procedures for delivery of fecal transplant

Oral capsule as effective as invasive procedures for delivery of fecal transplant

A noninvasive method of delivering a promising therapy for persistent Clostridium difficile ( C. difficile ) infection appears to be as effective as treatment via colonoscopy or through a nasogastric tube Continue reading

Parental misconceptions about concussions could hinder treatment, recovery

Parental misconceptions about concussions could hinder treatment, recovery

With football season in full swing, there’s no shortage of talk about young players — from high school down to the pee wee levels — suffering from concussions. Continue reading

Counting pitches can save young players’ arms but not always used consistently

Counting pitches can save young players’ arms but not always used consistently

Youth baseball has morphed into a year-round sport, with some athletes playing on multiple teams in the same season. One result: an increasing number of pitchers sidelined with overuse injuries or needing surgery Continue reading