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The effects of soy and whey protein supplementation on acute hormonal reponses to resistance exercise in men

The effects of soy and whey protein supplementation on acute hormonal reponses to resistance exercise in men

With protein supplement use by athletes on the rise, a group of researchers expanded upon prior research examining the effects of soy and whey protein supplementation on testosterone, sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG), and cortisol responses to an acute bout of resistance exercise. Their study, “The Effects of Soy and Whey Protein Supplementation on Acute Hormonal Reponses to Resistance Exercise in Men” is the 2014 Ragus Award Winner as Best Article from the Journal of the American College of Nutrition , the official publication of the American College of Nutrition Continue reading

Obesity in Pacific islands ‘a colonial legacy’ of settlers trying to civilize the locals

Obesity in Pacific islands ‘a colonial legacy’ of settlers trying to civilize the locals

Scientists have known for some time that Pacific islanders are more prone to obesity than people in other nations. Continue reading

Sibling bullying linked to later depression, self-harm

Sibling bullying linked to later depression, self-harm

A new study has found that children who revealed they had been bullied by their brothers or sisters several times a week or more during early adolescence were twice as likely to report being clinically depressed as young adults. They were also twice as likely to say they had self-harmed within the previous year compared with those who had not been bullied. The findings, published in the journal Pediatrics , are the results of the first longitudinal study to investigate possible links between sibling bullying and clinical depression and self-harm in young adults. Continue reading

Shrink-wrapping spacesuits: Spacesuits of the future may resemble a streamlined second skin

Shrink-wrapping spacesuits: Spacesuits of the future may resemble a streamlined second skin

For future astronauts, the process of suiting up may go something like this: Instead of climbing into a conventional, bulky, gas-pressurized suit, an astronaut may don a lightweight, stretchy garment, lined with tiny, musclelike coils. She would then plug in to a spacecraft’s power supply, triggering the coils to contract and essentially shrink-wrap the garment around her body. Continue reading

Mitochondria’s role in neurodegenerative diseases clearer thanks to mouse study

Mitochondria’s role in neurodegenerative diseases clearer thanks to mouse study

A new study by researchers at the University of Utah School of Medicine sheds light on a longstanding question about the role of mitochondria in debilitating and fatal motor neuron diseases and resulted in a new mouse model to study such illnesses. Researchers led by Janet Shaw, Ph.D., professor of biochemistry, found that when healthy, functioning mitochondria was prevented from moving along axons — nerve fibers that conduct electricity away from neurons — mice developed symptoms of neurodegenerative diseases. Continue reading

Bad cold or Enterovirus 68? Infectious diseases specialist answers common questions

Bad cold or Enterovirus 68? Infectious diseases specialist answers common questions

Does your child have Enterovirus 68 or just a bad cold? It can be hard to tell the difference between the two, but Pia Pannaraj , MD, Infectious Diseases specialist at Children’s Hospital Los Angeles speaks on how parents should treat their kids’ symptoms and when to seek medical attention Continue reading

Wireless sensor transmits tumor pressure

Wireless sensor transmits tumor pressure

The interstitial pressure inside a tumor is often remarkably high compared to normal tissues and is thought to impede the delivery of chemotherapeutic agents as well as decrease the effectiveness of radiation therapy. While medications exist that temporarily decrease tumor pressure, identifying the optimal window to initiate treatment — when tumor pressure is lowest — remains a challenge Continue reading

Premature deaths could be reduced by 40% over next 20 years, researchers say

Premature deaths could be reduced by 40% over next 20 years, researchers say

New research published today in The Lancet suggests that, with sustained international efforts, the number of premature deaths could be reduced by 40% over the next two decades (2010-2030), halving under-50 mortality and preventing a third of the deaths at ages 50-69 years. The findings reveal that, between 2000 and 2010, child deaths fell by one-third worldwide, helped by the fourth Millennium Development Goal (MDG) to reduce child deaths by two-thirds; and premature deaths among adults fell by one-sixth, helped by MDG 5 to reduce maternal mortality and MDG 6 to fight AIDS, malaria and other diseases. Continue reading

Mycotoxin present in many types of food deteriorates neuroregeneration

Mycotoxin present in many types of food deteriorates neuroregeneration

The research, carried out in the Faculty of Health Sciences of CEU Cardenal Herrera University, in cooperation with the University of Valencia, was published in the Journal of Applied Toxicology . Continue reading

Pregnancy hormone link to poor maths

Pregnancy hormone link to poor maths

unable to retrieve full-text contentResearch suggests children born to mothers who have low thyroid hormone levels during pregnancy do worse at maths. Continue reading