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Prolonged, heavy bleeding during menopause is common

Prolonged, heavy bleeding during menopause is common

Women going through menopause most likely think of it as the time for an end to predictable monthly periods. Researchers at the University of Michigan say it’s normal, however, for the majority of them to experience an increase in the amount and duration of bleeding episodes, which may occur at various times throughout the menopausal transition. The researchers from the U-M School of Public Health and U-M Health System offer the first long-term study of bleeding patterns in women of multiple race/ethnicities who were going through menopause Continue reading

Prolonged, heavy bleeding during menopause is common

Prolonged, heavy bleeding during menopause is common

Women going through menopause most likely think of it as the time for an end to predictable monthly periods. Researchers at the University of Michigan say it’s normal, however, for the majority of them to experience an increase in the amount and duration of bleeding episodes, which may occur at various times throughout the menopausal transition. The researchers from the U-M School of Public Health and U-M Health System offer the first long-term study of bleeding patterns in women of multiple race/ethnicities who were going through menopause Continue reading

New standards proposed for gauging muscle decline in older adults

New standards proposed for gauging muscle decline in older adults

Sarcopenia — the age-related loss of muscle mass and strength — may put up to 50 percent of seniors at greater risk for disability, yet there is no consensus within the medical community for how this condition should be measured. However, a new collection of articles appearing in The Journals of Gerontology, Series A: Biological Sciences and Medical Sciences (volume 69, number 5) lays out an empirically derived set of criteria for diagnosing sarcopenia. These recommendations are a result of the Foundation for the National Institutes of Health Biomarkers Consortium Sarcopenia Project, which includes scientists and grantees from the National Institutes of Health, along with other partners in government, academia, and the private sector. Continue reading

New standards proposed for gauging muscle decline in older adults

New standards proposed for gauging muscle decline in older adults

Sarcopenia — the age-related loss of muscle mass and strength — may put up to 50 percent of seniors at greater risk for disability, yet there is no consensus within the medical community for how this condition should be measured. However, a new collection of articles appearing in The Journals of Gerontology, Series A: Biological Sciences and Medical Sciences (volume 69, number 5) lays out an empirically derived set of criteria for diagnosing sarcopenia Continue reading

Brain changes associated with casual marijuana use in young adults: More ‘joints’ equal more damage

Brain changes associated with casual marijuana use in young adults: More ‘joints’ equal more damage

The size and shape of two brain regions involved in emotion and motivation may differ in young adults who smoke marijuana at least once a week, according to a study published April 16 in The Journal of Neuroscience . The findings suggest that recreational marijuana use may lead to previously unidentified brain changes, and highlight the importance of research aimed at understanding the long-term effects of low to moderate marijuana use on the brain. Marijuana is the most commonly used illicit drug in the United States, with an estimated 18.9 million people reporting recent use, according to the most current analysis of the National Survey on Drug Use and Mental Health. Continue reading

Brain changes associated with casual marijuana use in young adults: More ‘joints’ equal more damage

Brain changes associated with casual marijuana use in young adults: More ‘joints’ equal more damage

The size and shape of two brain regions involved in emotion and motivation may differ in young adults who smoke marijuana at least once a week, according to a study published April 16 in The Journal of Neuroscience . The findings suggest that recreational marijuana use may lead to previously unidentified brain changes, and highlight the importance of research aimed at understanding the long-term effects of low to moderate marijuana use on the brain. Marijuana is the most commonly used illicit drug in the United States, with an estimated 18.9 million people reporting recent use, according to the most current analysis of the National Survey on Drug Use and Mental Health. Continue reading

Blacks with financial worries have lower health scores

Blacks with financial worries have lower health scores

Feeling stress about finances leads some Black adults to rate their health more poorly, finds a new study in the American Journal of Health Behavior . While lower income and education among minorities have been linked to poor health for decades, this study focused just on the connection between financial worries and poor health. “Because the study was cross-sectional, we cannot say that one caused the other, but we know that financial strain is associated with poorer self-rated health among black adults,” said the study’s lead author Lorraine R. Continue reading

Blacks with financial worries have lower health scores

Blacks with financial worries have lower health scores

Feeling stress about finances leads some Black adults to rate their health more poorly, finds a new study in the American Journal of Health Behavior . While lower income and education among minorities have been linked to poor health for decades, this study focused just on the connection between financial worries and poor health. “Because the study was cross-sectional, we cannot say that one caused the other, but we know that financial strain is associated with poorer self-rated health among black adults,” said the study’s lead author Lorraine R. Continue reading

Potent, puzzling and (now less) toxic: Team discovers how antifungal drug works

Potent, puzzling and (now less) toxic: Team discovers how antifungal drug works

Scientists have solved a decades-old medical mystery — and in the process have found a potentially less toxic way to fight invasive fungal infections, which kill about 1.5 million people a year. The researchers say they now understand the mechanism of action of amphotericin, an antifungal drug that has been in use for more than 50 years — even though it is nearly as toxic to human cells as it is to the microbes it attacks. Continue reading

Potent, puzzling and (now less) toxic: Team discovers how antifungal drug works

Potent, puzzling and (now less) toxic: Team discovers how antifungal drug works

Scientists have solved a decades-old medical mystery — and in the process have found a potentially less toxic way to fight invasive fungal infections, which kill about 1.5 million people a year. The researchers say they now understand the mechanism of action of amphotericin, an antifungal drug that has been in use for more than 50 years — even though it is nearly as toxic to human cells as it is to the microbes it attacks. Continue reading