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Professional recommendations against routine prostate cancer screening have little effect

Professional recommendations against routine prostate cancer screening have little effect

The effect of guidelines recommending that elderly men should not be routinely screened for prostate cancer “has been minimal at best,” according to a new study led by researchers at Henry Ford Hospital. The study, published as a research letter online in JAMA Internal Medicine , focused on the use of PSA — prostate-specific antigen — to test for prostate cancer. Continue reading

Can your blood type affect your memory in later years?

Can your blood type affect your memory in later years?

People with blood type AB may be more likely to develop memory loss in later years than people with other blood types, according to a study published in the September 10, 2014, online issue of Neurology ®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. AB is the least common blood type, found in about 4 percent of the U.S Continue reading

Can your blood type affect your memory in later years?

Can your blood type affect your memory in later years?

People with blood type AB may be more likely to develop memory loss in later years than people with other blood types, according to a study published in the September 10, 2014, online issue of Neurology ®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. AB is the least common blood type, found in about 4 percent of the U.S Continue reading

Novel immunotherapy vaccine decreases recurrence in HER2 positive breast cancer patients

Novel immunotherapy vaccine decreases recurrence in HER2 positive breast cancer patients

A new breast cancer vaccine candidate, (GP2), provides further evidence of the potential of immunotherapy in preventing disease recurrence. This is especially the case for high-risk patients when it is combined with a powerful immunotherapy drug. These findings are being presented by The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center at the 2014 American Society of Clinical Oncology’s Breast Cancer Symposium in San Francisco Continue reading

Surgery to repair hip fracture reduces lifetime health care costs by more than $65,000 per patient

Surgery to repair hip fracture reduces lifetime health care costs by more than $65,000 per patient

Each year, more than 300,000 Americans, primarily adults over age 65, sustain a hip fracture, a debilitating injury that can diminish life quality and expectancy, and result in lost work days and substantial, long-term financial costs to patients, families, insurers and government agencies. And while surgery, the primary treatment for hip fractures, successfully reduces mortality risk and improves physical function, little is known about the procedure’s value and return on investment. Continue reading

Finding keys to glioblastoma therapeutic resistance

Finding keys to glioblastoma therapeutic resistance

Researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine have found one of the keys to why certain glioblastomas — the primary form of a deadly brain cancer — are resistant to drug therapy. The answer lies not in the DNA sequence of the tumor, but in its epigenetic signature Continue reading

More common procedures for painful facial tics carry high costs

More common procedures for painful facial tics carry high costs

For patients who need surgery for facial pain caused by trigeminal neuralgia, the most cost-effective procedure is the least often used, reports a study in the September issue of Neurosurgery, official journal of the Congress of Neurological Surgeons. The journal is published by Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, a part of Wolters Kluwer Health. Continue reading

Potential risk factors for urinary tract infections in young girls

Potential risk factors for urinary tract infections in young girls

Young girls with an intense, red, itchy rash on their outer genital organs may be at increased risk of developing urinary tract infections (UTIs), according to new research from Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center. The treatment may be as simple as better hygiene and avoiding potential irritants such as bubble baths and swimming pools Continue reading

Children with autism have extra synapses in brain: May be possible to prune synapses with drug after diagnosis

Children with autism have extra synapses in brain: May be possible to prune synapses with drug after diagnosis

Children and adolescents with autism have a surplus of synapses in the brain, and this excess is due to a slowdown in a normal brain “pruning” process during development, according to a study by neuroscientists at Columbia University Medical Center (CUMC). Continue reading

Space station inspired robot to help heal sick children

Space station inspired robot to help heal sick children

Children love robots. In all shapes, sizes, “personalities” and “smarts,” these electronic wonders have been found under Christmas trees by kids and unwrapped on birthdays for years. The gift of space-inspired robotics now goes beyond toys Continue reading