List/Grid

Surgery & Anesthesiology Subscribe to Surgery & Anesthesiology

Surgery to repair hip fracture reduces lifetime health care costs by more than $65,000 per patient

Surgery to repair hip fracture reduces lifetime health care costs by more than $65,000 per patient

Each year, more than 300,000 Americans, primarily adults over age 65, sustain a hip fracture, a debilitating injury that can diminish life quality and expectancy, and result in lost work days and substantial, long-term financial costs to patients, families, insurers and government agencies. And while surgery, the primary treatment for hip fractures, successfully reduces mortality risk and improves physical function, little is known about the procedure’s value and return on investment. Continue reading

Finding keys to glioblastoma therapeutic resistance

Finding keys to glioblastoma therapeutic resistance

Researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine have found one of the keys to why certain glioblastomas — the primary form of a deadly brain cancer — are resistant to drug therapy. The answer lies not in the DNA sequence of the tumor, but in its epigenetic signature Continue reading

More common procedures for painful facial tics carry high costs

More common procedures for painful facial tics carry high costs

For patients who need surgery for facial pain caused by trigeminal neuralgia, the most cost-effective procedure is the least often used, reports a study in the September issue of Neurosurgery, official journal of the Congress of Neurological Surgeons. The journal is published by Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, a part of Wolters Kluwer Health. Continue reading

Potential risk factors for urinary tract infections in young girls

Potential risk factors for urinary tract infections in young girls

Young girls with an intense, red, itchy rash on their outer genital organs may be at increased risk of developing urinary tract infections (UTIs), according to new research from Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center. The treatment may be as simple as better hygiene and avoiding potential irritants such as bubble baths and swimming pools Continue reading

Children with autism have extra synapses in brain: May be possible to prune synapses with drug after diagnosis

Children with autism have extra synapses in brain: May be possible to prune synapses with drug after diagnosis

Children and adolescents with autism have a surplus of synapses in the brain, and this excess is due to a slowdown in a normal brain “pruning” process during development, according to a study by neuroscientists at Columbia University Medical Center (CUMC). Continue reading

Space station inspired robot to help heal sick children

Space station inspired robot to help heal sick children

Children love robots. In all shapes, sizes, “personalities” and “smarts,” these electronic wonders have been found under Christmas trees by kids and unwrapped on birthdays for years. The gift of space-inspired robotics now goes beyond toys Continue reading

Missing Protein Restored in Patients with Muscular Dystrophy

Missing Protein Restored in Patients with Muscular Dystrophy

When muscle cell membranes are damaged, the repair protein dysferlin is activated and reseals muscle membrane tears. If this repair protein is altered due to a genetic mutation, the body’s own “quality control” system (the so called proteasome) identifies the protein as being defective and eliminates it. Continue reading

Pigs’ hearts transplanted into baboon hosts remain viable more than a year

Pigs’ hearts transplanted into baboon hosts remain viable more than a year

Investigators from the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) have successfully transplanted hearts from genetically engineered piglets into baboons’ abdomens and had the hearts survive for more than one year, twice as long as previously reported. This was achieved by using genetically engineered porcine donors and a more focused immunosuppression regimen in the baboon recipients, according to a study published in The Journal of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery , an official publication of the American Association for Thoracic Surgery. Cardiac transplantation is the treatment of choice for end stage heart failure. Continue reading

Surprising differences in how teen athletes experience concussion

Surprising differences in how teen athletes experience concussion

With multiple concussions between the two of them, Dan Han and Lisa Koehl’s latest research interest isn’t surprising. “I played competitive soccer through high school and continue to play recreationally,” says Koehl, a doctoral candidate in the University of Kentucky’s Department of Psychology, “so I have firsthand experience with the dynamics that come into play when a teen suffers a concussion.” As a former high school assistant principal in the Chicago public school system, Han was responsible for overseeing student-athletes’ return to school after a concussion. Han left educational administration to pursue his doctorate in neuropsychology Continue reading

Tests to Diagnose Invasive Aspergillosis with 100% Accuracy

Tests to Diagnose Invasive Aspergillosis with 100% Accuracy

The fungal infection invasive aspergillosis (IA) can be life threatening, especially in patients whose immune systems are weakened by chemotherapy or immunosuppressive drugs. Despite the critical need for early detection, IA remains difficult to diagnose. A study in The Journal of Molecular Diagnostics compared three diagnostic tests and found that the combination of nucleic acid sequence-based amplification (NASBA) and real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR) detects aspergillosis with 100% accuracy. Continue reading