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Evidence supports deep brain stimulation for obsessive-compulsive disorder

Evidence supports deep brain stimulation for obsessive-compulsive disorder

Available research evidence supports the use of deep brain stimulation (DBS) for patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) who don’t respond to other treatments, concludes a review in the October issue of Neurosurgery , official journal of the Congress of Neurological Surgeons (CNS). The journal is published by Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, a part of Wolters Kluwer Health. Based on evidence, two specific bilateral DBS techniques are recommended for treatment of carefully selected patients with OCD, according to a new clinical practice guideline endorsed by the CNS and the American Association of Neurological Surgeons. Continue reading

Finding keys to glioblastoma therapeutic resistance

Finding keys to glioblastoma therapeutic resistance

Researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine have found one of the keys to why certain glioblastomas — the primary form of a deadly brain cancer — are resistant to drug therapy. The answer lies not in the DNA sequence of the tumor, but in its epigenetic signature Continue reading

More common procedures for painful facial tics carry high costs

More common procedures for painful facial tics carry high costs

For patients who need surgery for facial pain caused by trigeminal neuralgia, the most cost-effective procedure is the least often used, reports a study in the September issue of Neurosurgery, official journal of the Congress of Neurological Surgeons. The journal is published by Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, a part of Wolters Kluwer Health. Continue reading

Space station inspired robot to help heal sick children

Space station inspired robot to help heal sick children

Children love robots. In all shapes, sizes, “personalities” and “smarts,” these electronic wonders have been found under Christmas trees by kids and unwrapped on birthdays for years. The gift of space-inspired robotics now goes beyond toys Continue reading

Surprising differences in how teen athletes experience concussion

Surprising differences in how teen athletes experience concussion

With multiple concussions between the two of them, Dan Han and Lisa Koehl’s latest research interest isn’t surprising. “I played competitive soccer through high school and continue to play recreationally,” says Koehl, a doctoral candidate in the University of Kentucky’s Department of Psychology, “so I have firsthand experience with the dynamics that come into play when a teen suffers a concussion.” As a former high school assistant principal in the Chicago public school system, Han was responsible for overseeing student-athletes’ return to school after a concussion. Han left educational administration to pursue his doctorate in neuropsychology Continue reading

Focal blood-brain-barrier disruption with high-frequency pulsed electric fields

Focal blood-brain-barrier disruption with high-frequency pulsed electric fields

A team of researchers from the Virginia Tech-Wake Forest University School of Biomedical Engineering and Sciences have developed a new way of using electricity to open the blood-brain-barrier (BBB). Continue reading

Brain tumors fly under body’s radar like stealth jets, new research suggests

Brain tumors fly under body’s radar like stealth jets, new research suggests

Brain tumors fly under the radar of the body’s defense forces by coating their cells with extra amounts of a specific protein, new research shows. Like a stealth fighter jet, the coating means the cells evade detection by the early-warning immune system that should detect and kill them. Continue reading

Bone tumour destroyed using incisionless surgery: First in North American child

Bone tumour destroyed using incisionless surgery: First in North American child

A patient at The Hospital for Sick Children (SickKids) is the first child in North America to have undergone a specialized procedure that uses ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to destroy a tumor in his leg without piercing the skin. Doctors used an MRI to guide high-intensity ultrasound waves to destroy a benign bone tumor called osteoid osteoma. Continue reading

Study of noninvasive retinal imaging device presented at Alzheimer’s conference

Study of noninvasive retinal imaging device presented at Alzheimer’s conference

A noninvasive optical imaging device developed at Cedars-Sinai can provide early detection of changes that later occur in the brain and are a classic sign of Alzheimer’s disease, according to preliminary results from investigators conducting a clinical trial in Australia. The researchers will present their findings July 15 in an oral presentation at the Alzheimer’s Association International Conference 2014 in Copenhagen, Denmark. Continue reading

DARPA taps Lawrence Livermore to develop world’s first neural device to restore memory

DARPA taps Lawrence Livermore to develop world’s first neural device to restore memory

The Department of Defense’s Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) awarded Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) up to $2.5 million to develop an implantable neural device with the ability to record and stimulate neurons within the brain to help restore memory, DARPA officials announced this week. The research builds on the understanding that memory is a process in which neurons in certain regions of the brain encode information, store it and retrieve it. Certain types of illnesses and injuries, including Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI), Alzheimer’s disease and epilepsy, disrupt this process and cause memory loss. Continue reading