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Immune system changes may drive aggressiveness of recurrent tumors

Immune system changes may drive aggressiveness of recurrent tumors

Dec. 26, 2012 — Nearly half of the 700,000 cancer patients who undergo surgical removal of a primary tumor each year suffer a recurrence of their disease at some point, and many of those patients will eventually die from their disease. Continue reading

New MRI method may help diagnose dementia

New MRI method may help diagnose dementia

Dec. 26, 2012 — A new way to use MRI scans may help determine whether dementia is Alzheimer’s disease or another type of dementia, according to new research published in the December 26, 2012, online issue of Neurology ®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. Alzheimer’s disease and frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) often have similar symptoms, even though the underlying disease process is much different Continue reading

New MRI method may help diagnose dementia

New MRI method may help diagnose dementia

Dec. 26, 2012 — A new way to use MRI scans may help determine whether dementia is Alzheimer’s disease or another type of dementia, according to new research published in the December 26, 2012, online issue of Neurology ®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology Continue reading

Eyes may provide a look into multiple sclerosis progression

Eyes may provide a look into multiple sclerosis progression

Dec. 24, 2012 — New research suggests that thinning of a layer of the retina in the eyes may show how fast multiple sclerosis (MS) is progressing in people with the disease. Continue reading

Brain rhythm predicts real-time sleep stability, may lead to more precise sleep medications

Brain rhythm predicts real-time sleep stability, may lead to more precise sleep medications

ScienceDaily (Mar. 3, 2011) — A new study finds that a brain rhythm considered the hallmark of wakefulness not only persists inconspicuously during sleep but also signifies an individual’s vulnerability to disturbance by the outside world. In their report in the March 3 PLoS One , the team from the Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) Division of Sleep Medicine uses computerized EEG signal processing to detect subtle fluctuations in the alpha rhythm during sleep and shows that greater alpha intensity is associated with increased sleep fragility. Continue reading

NASA light technology successfully reduces cancer patients painful side effects from radiation and chemotherapy

NASA light technology successfully reduces cancer patients painful side effects from radiation and chemotherapy

ScienceDaily (Mar. 6, 2011) — A NASA technology originally developed for plant growth experiments on space shuttle missions has successfully reduced the painful side effects resulting from chemotherapy and radiation treatment in bone marrow and stem cell transplant patients. In a two-year clinical trial, cancer patients undergoing bone marrow or stem cell transplants were given a far red/near infrared Light Emitting Diode treatment called High Emissivity Aluminiferous Luminescent Substrate, or HEALS, to treat oral mucositis — a common and extremely painful side effect of chemotherapy and radiation treatment. Continue reading

Brain’s ‘autopilot’ provides insight into early development of Alzheimer’s disease

Brain’s ‘autopilot’ provides insight into early development of Alzheimer’s disease

ScienceDaily (Mar. 3, 2011) — Watching the brain’s “autopilot” network in real time may help determine the onset of cognitive decline and potentially aid in making an early diagnosis of Alzheimer’s disease, according to researchers at Duke University Medical Center. While traditional MRI and imaging studies conducted in Alzheimer’s disease have focused on the anatomy and function of individual regions of the brain, the Duke team conducted the first study to test how the integrity of an entire brain network relates to future cognitive decline. Continue reading

Spinal cord injury: Human cells derived from stem cells restore movement in animal models

Spinal cord injury: Human cells derived from stem cells restore movement in animal models

ScienceDaily (Mar. 3, 2011) — For the first time, scientists discovered that a specific type of human cell, generated from stem cells and transplanted into spinal cord injured rats, provide tremendous benefit, not only repairing damage to the nervous system but helping the animals regain locomotor function as well. The study, published March 2 in the journal PLoS ONE , focuses on human astrocytes — the major support cells in the central nervous system — and indicates that transplantation of these cells represents a potential new avenue for the treatment of spinal cord injuries and other central nervous system disorders. Continue reading