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Excessive protein synthesis linked to autistic-like behaviors, neuroscientists find

Excessive protein synthesis linked to autistic-like behaviors, neuroscientists find

Dec. 23, 2012 — Autistic-like behaviors can be partially remedied by normalizing excessive levels of protein synthesis in the brain, a team of researchers has found in a study of laboratory mice. The findings, which appear in the latest issue of Nature , provide a pathway to the creation of pharmaceuticals aimed at treating autism spectrum disorders (ASD) that are associated with diminished social interaction skills, impaired communication ability, and repetitive behaviors. Continue reading

Many causes for learning lags in tumor disorder

Many causes for learning lags in tumor disorder

Dec. 21, 2012 — The causes of learning problems associated with an inherited brain tumor disorder are much more complex than scientists had anticipated, researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis report. Continue reading

Many causes for learning lags in tumor disorder

Many causes for learning lags in tumor disorder

Dec. 21, 2012 — The causes of learning problems associated with an inherited brain tumor disorder are much more complex than scientists had anticipated, researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis report. Continue reading

New pathways that drive metastatic prostate cancer identified

New pathways that drive metastatic prostate cancer identified

Dec. 21, 2012 — Elevated levels of Cyclin D1b could function as a novel biomarker of lethal metastatic disease in prostate cancer patients, according to a pre-clinical study published ahead of print on December 21 in the Journal of Clinical Investigation by researchers at the Kimmel Cancer Center at Jefferson Continue reading

Better stroke care, everywhere: Study boosts local hospitals’ clotbuster use

Better stroke care, everywhere: Study boosts local hospitals’ clotbuster use

Dec. 20, 2012 — From the moment a stroke occurs, patients must race against the clock to get treatment that can prevent lasting damage. Continue reading

MRIs reveal signs of brain injuries not seen in CT scans

MRIs reveal signs of brain injuries not seen in CT scans

Dec. 18, 2012 — Hospital MRIs may be better at predicting long-term outcomes for people with mild traumatic brain injuries than CT scans, the standard technique for evaluating such injuries in the emergency room, according to a clinical trial led by researchers at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) and the San Francisco General Hospital and Trauma Center (SFGH) Continue reading

Drug that may help fight Duchenne muscular dystrophy discovered

Drug that may help fight Duchenne muscular dystrophy discovered

Dec. 12, 2012 — Drugs are currently being tested that show promise in treating patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), an inherited disease that affects about one in 3,600 boys and results in muscle degeneration and, eventually, death. Now, scientists at UCLA have found a drug, already approved by the U.S Continue reading

Feeling lonely linked to increased risk of dementia in later life

Feeling lonely linked to increased risk of dementia in later life

Dec. Continue reading

Can going hungry as a child slow down cognitive decline in later years?

Can going hungry as a child slow down cognitive decline in later years?

Dec. 10, 2012 — People who sometimes went hungry as children had slower cognitive decline once they were elderly than people who always had enough food to eat, according to a new study published in the December 11, 2012, print issue of Neurology® , the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology Continue reading

One gene predicts rapid ALS progression 80 percent of the time

One gene predicts rapid ALS progression 80 percent of the time

ScienceDaily (Dec. 7, 2012) — The debilitating symptoms of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, or ALS, appear to be increased by a lack of inflammation-reducing T cells, report scientists from the Methodist Neurological Institute in an upcoming print issue of the journal EMBO Molecular Medicine . The researchers found that expression of the gene FoxP3 — which helps control the production of anti-inflammatory T cells — was an indicator of disease progression in 80 percent of the patients they studied Continue reading