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Physician rating websites rely on few patient reviews

Physician rating websites rely on few patient reviews

Jan. 2, 2013 — Millions of Americans read physician ratings on websites such as Healthgrades.com, but such ratings are based on scores from an average of only 2.4 patients, a Loyola University Medical Center study has found. The study of 500 randomly selected urologists found that 79.6 percent of physicians were rated by at least one of the 10 free physician-review websites researchers examined. Continue reading

Some men complaint of shortened penis following prostate cancer treatment

Some men complaint of shortened penis following prostate cancer treatment

Jan. 2, 2013 — A small percentage of men in a prostate cancer study complained that their penis seemed shorter following treatment, with some saying that it interfered with intimate relationships and caused them to regret the type of treatment they chose. Continue reading

‘Protecting’ psychiatric medical records puts patients at risk of hospitalization

‘Protecting’ psychiatric medical records puts patients at risk of hospitalization

Jan. Continue reading

Late-life depression associated with prevalent mild cognitive impairment, increased risk of dementia

Late-life depression associated with prevalent mild cognitive impairment, increased risk of dementia

Dec. 31, 2012 — Depression in a group of Medicare recipients ages 65 years and older appears to be associated with prevalent mild cognitive impairment and an increased risk of dementia, according to a report published Online First by Archives of Neurology, a JAMA Network publication. Depressive symptoms occur in 3 percent to 63 percent of patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and some studies have shown an increased dementia risk in individuals with a history of depression Continue reading

New MRI method may help diagnose dementia

New MRI method may help diagnose dementia

Dec. 26, 2012 — A new way to use MRI scans may help determine whether dementia is Alzheimer’s disease or another type of dementia, according to new research published in the December 26, 2012, online issue of Neurology ®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. Alzheimer’s disease and frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) often have similar symptoms, even though the underlying disease process is much different Continue reading

New MRI method may help diagnose dementia

New MRI method may help diagnose dementia

Dec. 26, 2012 — A new way to use MRI scans may help determine whether dementia is Alzheimer’s disease or another type of dementia, according to new research published in the December 26, 2012, online issue of Neurology ®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology Continue reading

Eyes may provide a look into multiple sclerosis progression

Eyes may provide a look into multiple sclerosis progression

Dec. 24, 2012 — New research suggests that thinning of a layer of the retina in the eyes may show how fast multiple sclerosis (MS) is progressing in people with the disease. Continue reading

Brain rhythm predicts real-time sleep stability, may lead to more precise sleep medications

Brain rhythm predicts real-time sleep stability, may lead to more precise sleep medications

ScienceDaily (Mar. 3, 2011) — A new study finds that a brain rhythm considered the hallmark of wakefulness not only persists inconspicuously during sleep but also signifies an individual’s vulnerability to disturbance by the outside world. In their report in the March 3 PLoS One , the team from the Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) Division of Sleep Medicine uses computerized EEG signal processing to detect subtle fluctuations in the alpha rhythm during sleep and shows that greater alpha intensity is associated with increased sleep fragility. Continue reading

NASA light technology successfully reduces cancer patients painful side effects from radiation and chemotherapy

NASA light technology successfully reduces cancer patients painful side effects from radiation and chemotherapy

ScienceDaily (Mar. 6, 2011) — A NASA technology originally developed for plant growth experiments on space shuttle missions has successfully reduced the painful side effects resulting from chemotherapy and radiation treatment in bone marrow and stem cell transplant patients. In a two-year clinical trial, cancer patients undergoing bone marrow or stem cell transplants were given a far red/near infrared Light Emitting Diode treatment called High Emissivity Aluminiferous Luminescent Substrate, or HEALS, to treat oral mucositis — a common and extremely painful side effect of chemotherapy and radiation treatment. Continue reading

Human stem cells transformed into key neurons lost in Alzheimer’s

Human stem cells transformed into key neurons lost in Alzheimer’s

ScienceDaily (Mar. Continue reading