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Longevity gene may boost brain power: Researchers discover the gene may enhance cognitive abilities

Longevity gene may boost brain power: Researchers discover the gene may enhance cognitive abilities

Scientists showed that people who have a variant of a longevity gene, called KLOTHO, have improved brain skills such as thinking, learning and memory regardless of their age, sex, or whether they have a genetic risk factor for Alzheimer’s disease. Increasing KLOTHO gene levels in mice made them smarter, possibly by increasing the strength of connections between nerve cells in the brain. The study was partly funded by the National Institutes of Health Continue reading

Longevity gene may boost brain power: Researchers discover the gene may enhance cognitive abilities

Longevity gene may boost brain power: Researchers discover the gene may enhance cognitive abilities

Scientists showed that people who have a variant of a longevity gene, called KLOTHO, have improved brain skills such as thinking, learning and memory regardless of their age, sex, or whether they have a genetic risk factor for Alzheimer’s disease. Increasing KLOTHO gene levels in mice made them smarter, possibly by increasing the strength of connections between nerve cells in the brain. The study was partly funded by the National Institutes of Health Continue reading

Common drug restores blood flow in deadly form of muscular dystrophy: Results from 10-patient case study

Common drug restores blood flow in deadly form of muscular dystrophy: Results from 10-patient case study

Cedars-Sinai Heart Institute researchers have found that a commonly prescribed drug restores blood flow to oxygen-starved muscles of boys with Duchenne muscular dystrophy, a genetic muscle-wasting disease that rarely is seen in girls but affects one in 3,500 male babies, profoundly shortening life expectancy. It is the most common fatal disease that affects children. Continue reading

Infusion of young blood recharges brains of old mice

Infusion of young blood recharges brains of old mice

Something — or some things — in the blood of young mice has the ability to restore mental capabilities in old mice, a new study by Stanford University School of Medicine investigators has found. If the same goes for humans, it could spell a new paradigm for recharging our aging brains, and it might mean new therapeutic approaches for treating dementias such as Alzheimer’s disease. Continue reading

Pediatricians call for a Vitamin K tracking system for babies not getting shots

Pediatricians call for a Vitamin K tracking system for babies not getting shots

Doctors at Monroe Carell Jr. Children’s Hospital at Vanderbilt have seen a rise in late-onset vitamin K deficiency bleeding in young infants due to parents declining the shot at birth Continue reading

Stem cells from some infertile men form germ cells when transplanted into mice

Stem cells from some infertile men form germ cells when transplanted into mice

Stem cells made from the skin of adult, infertile men yield primordial germ cells — cells that normally become sperm — when transplanted into the reproductive system of mice, according to researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine and Montana State University. The infertile men in the study each had a type of genetic mutation that prevented them from making mature sperm — a condition called azoospermia. The research suggests that the men with azoospermia may have had germ cells at some point in their early lives, but lost them as they matured to adulthood Continue reading

Brain, cognitive reserve protect long-term against cognitive decline, MS researchers find

Brain, cognitive reserve protect long-term against cognitive decline, MS researchers find

Multiple sclerosis researchers have found that brain reserve and cognitive reserve confer a long-term protective effect against cognitive decline. James Sumowski, PhD, lead author of the article, and John DeLuca, PhD, are at Kessler Foundation. Co-authors are from the Manhattan Memory Center, New York, NY, the San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan, Italy, and the University of Belgrade, Serbia. Continue reading

Neurologists report on promise of statins, estrogen, telemedicine in Parkinson’s

Neurologists report on promise of statins, estrogen, telemedicine in Parkinson’s

A trio of studies from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania demonstrate new approaches to understanding, treating and potentially staving off Parkinson’s disease (PD). Studies show that factors such as estrogen exposure and statin use have an impact on the onset of Parkinson’s disease. And a new look at telemedicine demonstrates feasibility in providing care for Parkinson’s patients using remote video visits to expand access and center care around the needs of Parkinson’s patients. Continue reading

Neuroimaging Technique: Live from inside the cell in real-time

Neuroimaging Technique: Live from inside the cell in real-time

A novel imaging technique provides insights into the role of redox signaling and reactive oxygen species in living neurons, in real time. Continue reading

Outcome of stroke worse for people with infection

Outcome of stroke worse for people with infection

Infection is bad news for all of us — but it can be really serious to people who have had a stroke. Evidence is mounting that infection makes things much worse after a stroke. A team of scientists at the University of Manchester has now found a key to why and how infection is such a bad thing for stroke sufferers. Continue reading