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Call for circumcision gets a boost from experts

Call for circumcision gets a boost from experts

In the United States the rate of circumcision in men has increased to 81% over the past decade. In an important new study just published in advance in Mayo Clinic Proceedings authors from Australia and the United States have shown that the benefits of infant male circumcision to health exceed the risks by over 100 to 1. Brian Morris, Professor Emeritus in the School of Medical Sciences at the University of Sydney and his colleagues in Florida and Minnesota found that over their lifetime half of uncircumcised males will contract an adverse medical condition caused by their foreskin. Continue reading

Consistent blood pressure control may cut rate of second stroke in half

Consistent blood pressure control may cut rate of second stroke in half

Stroke survivors who consistently control their blood pressure may reduce the likelihood of a second stroke by more than half, according to new research in the American Heart Association journal Stroke . For the study, researchers analyzed the results from the Vitamin Intervention for Stroke Prevention (VISP) trial, which enrolled 3,680 ischemic stroke patients ages 35 and older in 1996-2003. Continue reading

Blood-brain barrier repair after stroke may prevent chronic brain deficits

Blood-brain barrier repair after stroke may prevent chronic brain deficits

Following ischemic stroke, the integrity of the blood-brain barrier (BBB), which prevents harmful substances such as inflammatory molecules from entering the brain, can be impaired in cerebral areas distant from initial ischemic insult. This disruptive condition, known as diaschisis, can lead to chronic post-stroke deficits, University of South Florida researchers report. In experiments using laboratory rats modeling ischemic stroke, USF investigators studied the consequences of the compromised BBB at the chronic post-stroke stage. Continue reading

Surprising new way to kill cancer cells

Surprising new way to kill cancer cells

Northwestern Medicine scientists have demonstrated that cancer cells — and not normal cells — can be killed by eliminating either the FAS receptor, also known as CD95, or its binding component, CD95 ligand. “The discovery seems counterintuitive because CD95 has previously been defined as a tumor suppressor,” said lead investigator Marcus Peter, professor in medicine-hematology/Oncology at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine. “But when we removed it from cancer cells, rather than proliferate, they died.” The findings were published March 20 in Cell Reports Continue reading

U.S. headache sufferers get $1 billion worth of brain scans each year

U.S. headache sufferers get $1 billion worth of brain scans each year

One in eight visits to a a doctor for a headache or migraine end up with the patient going for a brain scan, at a total cost of about $1 billion a year, a new University of Michigan Medical School study finds. Continue reading

Prostate specific antigen screening declines after 2012 USPSTF recommendations

Prostate specific antigen screening declines after 2012 USPSTF recommendations

Researchers at Case Western Reserve University and University Hospitals Case Medical Center have assessed the impact of the 2012 U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommendations against routine prostate specific antigen (PSA) cancer screenings, which cited evidence that the risks of screening outweigh the benefits. Results of the current study indicate that the USPSTF recommendations have resulted in a decrease in the number of PSA screenings ordered by doctors, with the greatest decline seen among urologists Continue reading

Prostate specific antigen screening declines after 2012 USPSTF recommendations

Prostate specific antigen screening declines after 2012 USPSTF recommendations

Researchers at Case Western Reserve University and University Hospitals Case Medical Center have assessed the impact of the 2012 U.S. Continue reading

One in three children with MS has cognitive impairment

One in three children with MS has cognitive impairment

Feb. 5, 2013 — Data from the largest multicenter study accessing cognitive functioning in children with multiple sclerosis (MS) reveals that one-third of these patients have cognitive impairment, according to a research paper published in the Journal of Child Neurology. Led by Lauren B Continue reading

New stroke gene discovery could lead to tailored treatments

New stroke gene discovery could lead to tailored treatments

Jan. 31, 2013 — A study led by King’s College London has identified a new genetic variant associated with stroke Continue reading

Exposure to antiepileptic drug in womb linked to autism risk

Exposure to antiepileptic drug in womb linked to autism risk

Jan. 30, 2013 — Children whose mothers take the antiepileptic drug sodium valproate while pregnant are at significantly increased risk of autism and other neurodevelopmental disorders, suggests a small study published online in the Journal of Neurology Neurosurgery and Psychiatry. Continue reading