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Tag Archives: annual-meeting

Gene duplications associated with autism evolved recently in human history

Gene duplications associated with autism evolved recently in human history

Human geneticists have discovered that a region of the genome associated with autism contains genetic variation that evolved in the last 250,000 years, after the divergence of humans from ancient hominids, and likely plays an important role in disease. Their findings were presented at the American Society of Human Genetics (ASHG) 2014 Annual Meeting in San Diego. Researchers at the University of Washington analyzed the genomes of 2,551 humans, 86 apes, one Neanderthal, and one Denisovan Continue reading

Mutation associated with cleft palate in humans, dogs identified

Mutation associated with cleft palate in humans, dogs identified

Scientists studying birth defects in humans and purebred dogs have identified an association between cleft lip and cleft palate — conditions that occur when the lip and mouth fail to form properly during pregnancy — and a mutation in the ADAMTS20 gene. Continue reading

Children’s genes affect their mothers’ risk of rheumatoid arthritis

Children’s genes affect their mothers’ risk of rheumatoid arthritis

A child’s genetic makeup may contribute to his or her mother’s risk of rheumatoid arthritis, possibly explaining why women are at higher risk of developing the disease than men. This research will be presented October 21, at the American Society of Human Genetics (ASHG) 2014 Annual Meeting in San Diego. Rheumatoid arthritis, a painful inflammatory condition that primarily affects the joints, has been tied to a variety of genetic and environmental factors, including lifestyle factors and previous infections. Continue reading

Study identifies when and how much various prostate cancer treatments will impact urinary and sexual functioning

Study identifies when and how much various prostate cancer treatments will impact urinary and sexual functioning

Men with prostate cancer may one day be able to predict when and how much various treatments will impact their urinary and sexual functioning, thanks in part to new findings that researchers at Fox Chase Cancer Center presented at the American Society for Radiation Oncology’s 56th Annual Meeting on Tuesday, September 16. Looking over data gathered from more than 17,000 surveys completed by men diagnosed with prostate cancer, Fox Chase researchers tracked when patients’ urinary and sexual symptoms changed following each type of treatment, and by how much. “The ultimate goal,” says study author Matthew Johnson, MD, Resident Physician in the Department of Radiation Oncology at Fox Chase, “is to develop a predictive tool that lets patients decide which treatment is right for them based on the symptoms they have beforehand, and their tolerance for any change — even temporary — in those symptoms.” After a diagnosis of prostate cancer, men have multiple treatment options, including surgery to remove the prostate and several types of radiation therapy Continue reading

Study identifies when and how much various prostate cancer treatments will impact urinary and sexual functioning

Study identifies when and how much various prostate cancer treatments will impact urinary and sexual functioning

Men with prostate cancer may one day be able to predict when and how much various treatments will impact their urinary and sexual functioning, thanks in part to new findings that researchers at Fox Chase Cancer Center presented at the American Society for Radiation Oncology’s 56th Annual Meeting on Tuesday, September 16. Looking over data gathered from more than 17,000 surveys completed by men diagnosed with prostate cancer, Fox Chase researchers tracked when patients’ urinary and sexual symptoms changed following each type of treatment, and by how much. “The ultimate goal,” says study author Matthew Johnson, MD, Resident Physician in the Department of Radiation Oncology at Fox Chase, “is to develop a predictive tool that lets patients decide which treatment is right for them based on the symptoms they have beforehand, and their tolerance for any change — even temporary — in those symptoms.” After a diagnosis of prostate cancer, men have multiple treatment options, including surgery to remove the prostate and several types of radiation therapy Continue reading

Proactive office ergonomics can increase job satisfaction, employee retention

Proactive office ergonomics can increase job satisfaction, employee retention

As the amount of time employees spend at their desks increases, so does musculoskeletal discomfort and other health issues associated with the office environment. Although office ergonomics training programs have been shown to improve employee well-being and productivity, in many cases training occurs only after complaints are logged Continue reading

Responses with crizotinib in MET-amplified lung cancer show new targetable form of disease

Responses with crizotinib in MET-amplified lung cancer show new targetable form of disease

A study presented at the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) Annual Meeting 2014 reports the results of a first-in-human, phase 1 dose escalation trial of crizotinib (XALKORI) in 14 patients with advanced, MET-amplified non-small cell lung cancer (NCT00585195). In 2011, the drug crizotinib earned accelerated approval by the US FDA to target the subset of advanced non-small cell lung cancers caused by rearrangements of the anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) gene, and subsequently was granted regular approval in 2013 Continue reading

One step closer to a breath test for lung cancer

One step closer to a breath test for lung cancer

Results of a University of Colorado Cancer Center study presented at the 50th Annual Meeting of the American Society for Clinical Oncology (ASCO) show that a test of organic compounds in exhaled breath can not only distinguish patients with lung cancer from patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), but can also define the stage of any cancer present. Continue reading

Patients with metastatic colon cancer respond to new combination therapy

Patients with metastatic colon cancer respond to new combination therapy

In an aggressive disease known for poor response rates, researchers from The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center found patients with advanced colorectal cancer responded well to a combination therapy of the drugs vermurafenib, cetuximab and irinotecan. Continue reading

Patients with metastatic colon cancer respond to new combination therapy

Patients with metastatic colon cancer respond to new combination therapy

In an aggressive disease known for poor response rates, researchers from The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center found patients with advanced colorectal cancer responded well to a combination therapy of the drugs vermurafenib, cetuximab and irinotecan. Continue reading