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Tag Archives: annual-meeting

Young athletes from higher income families more likely to suffer serious overuse injuries

Young athletes from higher income families more likely to suffer serious overuse injuries

A Loyola University Medical Center study is reporting for the first time a link between overuse injury rates in young athletes and their socioeconomic status. The rate of serious overuse injuries in athletes who come from families that can afford private insurance is 68 percent higher than the rate in lower-income athletes who are on public insurance (Medicaid), the study found Continue reading

Tumor-suppressor connects with histone protein to hinder gene expression

Tumor-suppressor connects with histone protein to hinder gene expression

A tumor-suppressing protein acts as a dimmer switch to dial down gene expression. It does this by reading a chemical message attached to another protein that’s tightly intertwined with DNA, a team led by scientists at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center reported at the AACR Annual Meeting 2014. The findings, also published in the journal Nature on April 10, provide evidence in support of the “histone code” hypothesis Continue reading

Tumor-suppressor connects with histone protein to hinder gene expression

Tumor-suppressor connects with histone protein to hinder gene expression

A tumor-suppressing protein acts as a dimmer switch to dial down gene expression. It does this by reading a chemical message attached to another protein that’s tightly intertwined with DNA, a team led by scientists at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center reported at the AACR Annual Meeting 2014. The findings, also published in the journal Nature on April 10, provide evidence in support of the “histone code” hypothesis. Continue reading

Potential therapeutic target for deadly brain cancer

Potential therapeutic target for deadly brain cancer

Researchers from the Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth will present a scientific poster on Tuesday, April 8, 2014 at the American Association of Cancer Researchers Annual Meeting in San Diego, CA. The research identifies a potential characteristic for predicting outcome in a deadly form of brain cancer known as glioblastoma multiforme. Existing therapies based on genetic information have failed to effectively treat glioblastomas Continue reading

Non-invasive imaging instead of repeated biopsy in active monitoring of prostate cancer

Non-invasive imaging instead of repeated biopsy in active monitoring of prostate cancer

Date: April 6, 2014 Source: University of Colorado Denver Summary: A novel method to ‘manipulate the lipid metabolism in the cancer cell to trick them to use more radiolabeled glucose, the basis of PET scanning’ is being described by researchers. The current study used the clinically safe drug etomoxir to block prostate cancer cells’ ability to oxidize lipids. Continue reading

Antioxidants can protect against omega 6 damage — or promote it

Antioxidants can protect against omega 6 damage — or promote it

Given omega 6 fatty acid’s reputation for promoting cancer — at least in animal studies — researchers are examining the role that antioxidants play in blocking the harmful effects of this culprit, found in many cooking oils. After all, antioxidants are supposed to prevent DNA damage. Continue reading

Genetic testing beneficial in melanoma treatment

Genetic testing beneficial in melanoma treatment

Genetic screening of cancer can help doctors customize treatments so that patients with melanoma have the best chance of beating it, according to the results of a clinical trial by researchers at the University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute (UPCI), a partner with UPMC CancerCenter. The trial, funded by the National Institutes of Health (NIH), will be presented Monday at the American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) Annual Meeting 2014. It showed that the cancer immune therapy drug ipilimumab appears most likely to prevent recurrence in patients whose cancer shows high expression of immune-related genes Continue reading

Common breast cancer subtype may benefit from personalized treatment approach

Common breast cancer subtype may benefit from personalized treatment approach

The second-most common type of breast cancer is a very different disease than the most common and appears to be a good candidate for a personalized approach to treatment, according to a multidisciplinary team led by scientists at the University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute (UPCI), a partner with UPMC CancerCenter. Invasive lobular carcinoma, characterized by a unique growth pattern in breast tissue that fails to form a lump, has distinct genetic markers which indicate drug therapies may provide benefits beyond those typically prescribed for the more common invasive ductal carcinoma. The results recently were published in Cancer Research and will be expanded upon on Tuesday at the American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) Annual Meeting 2014 Continue reading

Cognitive function and oral perception in independently-living octogenarians

Cognitive function and oral perception in independently-living octogenarians

Today, at the 43rd Annual Meeting & Exhibition of the American Association for Dental Research (AADR), held in conjunction with the 38th Annual Meeting of the Canadian Association for Dental Research, Kazunori Ikebe, from Osaka University, Japan, will present a research study titled “Cognitive Function and Oral Perception in Independently-living Octogenarians.” In this study, researchers hypothesized that the decline of cognitive impairment is involved in oral perceptions since its preclinical stage. The aim of this study was to examine association of cognitive function with tactile and taste perceptions in independently-living 80-year-old elderly. The participants were community-dwelling and independently-living elderly (n=956, 80 years old) excluding those with dementia Continue reading

Years of High School Football not linked to Neurocognitive Decline, study suggests

Years of High School Football not linked to Neurocognitive Decline, study suggests

As more parents consider whether it’s safe for adolescents to play football, a new Tulane University study of high school players found no link between years of play and any decline in neurocognitive function. The results, which were presented at the 2014 Annual Meeting of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (AAOS) in New Orleans on March 14, suggest risks of sport-related brain injuries are relatively low, said lead author Dr. Continue reading