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Tag Archives: Cell

Multitarget TB drug could treat other diseases, evade resistance

Multitarget TB drug could treat other diseases, evade resistance

A drug under clinical trials to treat tuberculosis could be the basis for a class of broad-spectrum drugs that act against various bacteria, fungal infections and parasites, yet evade resistance, according to a study by University of Illinois chemists and collaborators. Led by U. Continue reading

Eavesdropping on brain cell chatter

Eavesdropping on brain cell chatter

Everything we do — all of our movements, thoughts and feelings — are the result of neurons talking with one another, and recent studies have suggested that some of the conversations might not be all that private. Brain cells known as astrocytes may be listening in on, or even participating in, some of those discussions. But a new mouse study suggests that astrocytes might only be tuning in part of the time — specifically, when the neurons get really excited about something. Continue reading

Eavesdropping on brain cell chatter

Eavesdropping on brain cell chatter

Everything we do — all of our movements, thoughts and feelings — are the result of neurons talking with one another, and recent studies have suggested that some of the conversations might not be all that private. Brain cells known as astrocytes may be listening in on, or even participating in, some of those discussions. Continue reading

Hide and seek: Revealing camouflaged bacteria

Hide and seek: Revealing camouflaged bacteria

A research team at the Biozentrum of the University of Basel has discovered an protein family that plays a central role in the fight against the bacterial pathogen Salmonella within the cells. Continue reading

Researchers examine metabolism in defective cells

Researchers examine metabolism in defective cells

UAlberta researchers are taking a closer look at how two metabolic pathways interact to increase the lifespan of cells with mitochondrial defects. Magnus Friis (PhD ’10) is the lead author of the study, which was published online on April 10 and will be published in the April 24 issue of Cell Reports Continue reading

Synthetic gene circuits pump up cell signals in study of neurodegenerative diseases

Synthetic gene circuits pump up cell signals in study of neurodegenerative diseases

Synthetic genetic circuitry created by researchers at Rice University is helping them see, for the first time, how to regulate cell mechanisms that degrade the misfolded proteins implicated in Parkinson’s, Huntington’s and other diseases. The Rice lab of chemical and biomolecular engineer Laura Segatori has designed a sophisticated circuit that signals increases in the degradation of proteins by the cell’s ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS). The research appears online today in Nature Communications Continue reading

Synthetic gene circuits pump up cell signals in study of neurodegenerative diseases

Synthetic gene circuits pump up cell signals in study of neurodegenerative diseases

Synthetic genetic circuitry created by researchers at Rice University is helping them see, for the first time, how to regulate cell mechanisms that degrade the misfolded proteins implicated in Parkinson’s, Huntington’s and other diseases. The Rice lab of chemical and biomolecular engineer Laura Segatori has designed a sophisticated circuit that signals increases in the degradation of proteins by the cell’s ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS). The research appears online today in Nature Communications Continue reading

Zombie cancer cells eat themselves to live

Zombie cancer cells eat themselves to live

A University of Colorado Cancer Center study recently published in the journal Cell Reports and presented today at the American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) Annual Conference 2014 shows that the cellular process of autophagy in which cells “eat” parts of themselves in times of stress may allow cancer cells to recover and divide rather than die when faced with chemotherapies. Continue reading

Cancer researchers find key protein link

Cancer researchers find key protein link

A new understanding of proteins at the nexus of a cell’s decision to survive or die has implications for researchers who study cancer and age-related diseases, according to biophysicists at the Rice University-based Center for Theoretical Biological Physics (CTBP). Experiments and computer analysis of two key proteins revealed a previously unknown binding interface that could be addressed by medication. Results of the research appear this week in an open-source paper in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences Continue reading

To grow or not to grow: A step forward in adult vertebrate tissue regeneration

To grow or not to grow: A step forward in adult vertebrate tissue regeneration

The reason why some animals can regenerate tissues after severe organ loss or amputation while others, such as humans, cannot renew some structures has always intrigued scientists. In a study now published in PLOS ONE , a research group from Instituto Gulbenkian de Ciência (IGC, Portugal) led by Joaquín Rodríguez León provided new clues to solve this central question by investigating regeneration in an adult vertebrate model: the zebrafish. It was known that zebrafish is able to regenerate organs, and that electrical currents may play a role in this process, but the exact mechanisms are still unclear. Continue reading