List/Grid

Tag Archives: Cell

Nanoparticles used to enhance chemotherapy

Nanoparticles used to enhance chemotherapy

University of Georgia researchers have developed a new formulation of cisplatin, a common chemotherapy drug, that significantly increases the drug’s ability to target and destroy cancerous cells. Continue reading

Role of cohesin in cancer revised by researcher

Role of cohesin in cancer revised by researcher

Massive sequencing of cancer genomes brings to light new genes every day that could be involved in the process of tumour formation. Continue reading

Gene in brain linked to kidney cancer, researchers say

Gene in brain linked to kidney cancer, researchers say

A gene known to control brain growth and development is heavily involved in promoting clear cell renal cell carcinoma, the most common form of kidney cancer, researchers from Mayo Clinic in Florida are reporting. Continue reading

Family of proteins plays key role in cellular pump dynamics

Family of proteins plays key role in cellular pump dynamics

Case Western Reserve University scientists have discovered how a family of proteins — cation diffusion facilitators (CDFs) — regulates an important cellular cycle where a cell’s energy generated is converted to necessary cellular functions. The finding has the potential to inform future research aimed at identifying ways to ensure the process works as designed and, if successful, could lead to significant breakthroughs in the treatment of Parkinson’s, chronic liver disease and heart disease. Continue reading

Neurons get their neighbors to take out their trash

Neurons get their neighbors to take out their trash

Biologists have long considered cells to function like self-cleaning ovens, chewing up and recycling their own worn out parts as needed. But a new study challenges that basic principle, showing that some nerve cells found in the eye pass off their old energy-producing factories to neighboring support cells to be “eaten.” The find, which may bear on the roots of glaucoma, also has implications for Parkinson’s, Alzheimer’s, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and other diseases that involve a buildup of “garbage” in brain cells Continue reading

Functional nerve cells from skin cells

Functional nerve cells from skin cells

A new method of generating mature nerve cells from skin cells could greatly enhance understanding of neurodegenerative diseases, and could accelerate the development of new drugs and stem cell-based regenerative medicine. The nerve cells generated by this new method show the same functional characteristics as the mature cells found in the body, making them much better models for the study of age-related diseases such as Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s, and for the testing of new drugs. Eventually, the technique could also be used to generate mature nerve cells for transplantation into patients with a range of neurodegenerative diseases Continue reading

Mobilizing immune system against viruses: New way found

Mobilizing immune system against viruses: New way found

University of British Columbia scientists have uncovered an intricate chain reaction in the body’s immune system and have used the knowledge to develop a new treatment against harmful viruses. Viral pandemics, such as the coronavirus that caused the deadly SARS outbreak in 2002, have caused hundreds of deaths in Canada, yet effective anti-viral drugs are rare. A key element to this natural immune response is an antiviral protein in the blood called Interferon alpha. Continue reading

Sneaking drugs into cancer cells before triggering release

Sneaking drugs into cancer cells before triggering release

Biomedical engineering researchers have developed an anti-cancer drug delivery method that essentially smuggles the drug into a cancer cell before triggering its release. The method can be likened to keeping a cancer-killing bomb and its detonator separate until they are inside a cancer cell, where they then combine to destroy the cell. “This is an efficient, fast-acting way of delivering drugs to cancer cells and triggering cell death,” says Dr. Continue reading

Semi-synthetic organism: Scientists create first living organism that transmits added letters in DNA ‘alphabet’

Semi-synthetic organism: Scientists create first living organism that transmits added letters in DNA ‘alphabet’

Scientists at The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) have engineered a bacterium whose genetic material includes an added pair of DNA “letters,” or bases, not found in nature. The cells of this unique bacterium can replicate the unnatural DNA bases more or less normally, for as long as the molecular building blocks are supplied. “Life on Earth in all its diversity is encoded by only two pairs of DNA bases, A-T and C-G, and what we’ve made is an organism that stably contains those two plus a third, unnatural pair of bases,” said TSRI Associate Professor Floyd E. Continue reading

New knowledge about muscular dystrophy uncovered

New knowledge about muscular dystrophy uncovered

The most common form of muscular dystrophy among adults is dystrophia myotonica type 1 (DM1), where approximately 1 in every 8000 is affected by the disease. The severity of the disease varies from mild forms to severe congenital forms Continue reading