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Tag Archives: Chicago

Impact of race, ethnicity in motor complete spinal cord injury

Impact of race, ethnicity in motor complete spinal cord injury

Researchers have published a study examining racial and ethnic influences in the outcomes of patients with motor complete spinal cord injury (SCI). The article, “Racial and ethnic disparities in functioning at discharge and follow-up among patients with motor complete SCI,” was published online ahead of print on August 2 by the Archives of Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation . Findings included small but significant differences in self-care and mobility at discharge; no differences were apparent at 1-year followup. Continue reading

Beating childhood cancer does not necessarily make survivors healthier adults, study shows

Beating childhood cancer does not necessarily make survivors healthier adults, study shows

Having survived cancer as a child does not necessarily have a ripple effect that makes people lead a healthier lifestyle once they grow up. In fact, in a report derived from a National Cancer Institute-funded study of childhood cancer survivors known as the Chicago Healthy Living Study, investigators found that childhood cancer survivors in no way adhere more closely to guidelines on healthy eating than their cancer-free peers. Continue reading

Treatment developed by biologists shows promise in fighting fibrotic disease

Treatment developed by biologists shows promise in fighting fibrotic disease

A decade after first identifying serum amyloid P (SAP) as a key protein in human blood that controls routine tissue-related processes from scarring to healing, two Texas A&M University scientists and the biotechnology company they co-founded continue to make encouraging progress in the fight against fibrotic disease, a broad class of chronic conditions associated with an estimated 45 percent of U.S. deaths per year. Texas A&M biologists Richard Gomer and Darrell Pilling have collaborated in recent years on several SAP-related advances, from establishing Promedior Inc Continue reading

Treatment developed by biologists shows promise in fighting fibrotic disease

Treatment developed by biologists shows promise in fighting fibrotic disease

A decade after first identifying serum amyloid P (SAP) as a key protein in human blood that controls routine tissue-related processes from scarring to healing, two Texas A&M University scientists and the biotechnology company they co-founded continue to make encouraging progress in the fight against fibrotic disease, a broad class of chronic conditions associated with an estimated 45 percent of U.S. deaths per year. Texas A&M biologists Richard Gomer and Darrell Pilling have collaborated in recent years on several SAP-related advances, from establishing Promedior Inc Continue reading

Animal therapy reduces need for pain medication after joint-replacement surgery

Animal therapy reduces need for pain medication after joint-replacement surgery

Patients recovering from total joint replacement surgery who receive animal-assisted therapy (AAT) require less pain medication than those who do not experience this type of therapy. Continue reading

Slowing brain functions linked to increased risk of stroke, death

Slowing brain functions linked to increased risk of stroke, death

Cognitive abilities such as memory and attention are not only important after a stroke but also before; according to Declining memory and cognitive ability may increase the risk of stroke in adults over age 65. After stroke, cognitive function declined almost twice as fast Continue reading

Neck manipulation may be associated with stroke

Neck manipulation may be associated with stroke

Manipulating the neck has been associated with cervical dissection, a type of arterial tear that can lead to stroke. Continue reading

Drug’s effect on Alzheimer’s may depend on severity of disease

Drug’s effect on Alzheimer’s may depend on severity of disease

A cancer drug that has shown promise against Alzheimer’s disease (AD) in mice and has begun early clinical trials has yielded perplexing results in a novel mouse model of AD that mimics the genetics and pathology of the human disease more closely than any other animal model. The drug, bexarotene, was found to reduce levels of the neurotoxic protein amyloid-beta in experimental mice with late-stage Alzheimer’s but to increase levels during early stages of disease. The finding, by researchers at the University of Illinois at Chicago College of Medicine, was reported July 16 at the Alzheimer’s Association International Conference in Copenhagen by Mary Jo LaDu, who in 2012 developed a transgenic mouse that is now regarded as the best animal model of the human disease. Continue reading

Young Hispanics often obese, at higher risk for heart diseases

Young Hispanics often obese, at higher risk for heart diseases

Obesity is common among U.S. Hispanics and is severe particularly among young Hispanics, according to research in the Journal of the American Heart Association ( JAHA ). Continue reading

Doctors have ethical obligation to educate, protect athletes from concussion, experts say

Doctors have ethical obligation to educate, protect athletes from concussion, experts say

The American Academy of Neurology (AAN), the largest professional association of neurologists and a leading authority on sports concussion, is releasing a new position paper that states doctors have an ethical obligation to educate and protect athletes from sports concussion and clear them to play only when the athlete is medically ready, standing firm against objections from players, parents or coaches. The statement is published in the July 9, 2014, online issue of Neurology ®, the medical journal of the AAN, and is being released ahead of The Sports Concussion Conference, July 11-13, 2014, in Chicago, where the AAN will share the latest scientific advances in diagnosing and treating sports concussion. The AAN position statement calls for doctors to safeguard the future mental and physical health of athletes as a top priority, especially regarding return-to-play decision-making. Continue reading