List/Grid

Tag Archives: Children

Pediatricians call for a Vitamin K tracking system for babies not getting shots

Pediatricians call for a Vitamin K tracking system for babies not getting shots

Doctors at Monroe Carell Jr. Children’s Hospital at Vanderbilt have seen a rise in late-onset vitamin K deficiency bleeding in young infants due to parents declining the shot at birth Continue reading

Yoga can help keep expectant mothers stress free: First evidence found

Yoga can help keep expectant mothers stress free: First evidence found

For the first time, researchers in the UK have studied the effects of yoga on pregnant women, and found that it can reduce the risk of them developing anxiety and depression. Stress during pregnancy has been linked to premature birth, low birth weight and increased developmental and behavioural problems in the child as a toddler and adolescent, as well as later mental health problems in the mother. A high level of anxiety during pregnancy is linked with postnatal depression which in turn is associated with increased risk of developing depression later in life. Continue reading

Increased prevalence of GI symptoms among children with autism, study confirms

Increased prevalence of GI symptoms among children with autism, study confirms

A new study conducted by researchers at Marcus Autism Center, Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta and Emory University School of Medicine indicates that children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) are more than four times more likely to experience general gastrointestinal (GI) complaints compared with peers, are more than three times as prone to experience constipation and diarrhea than peers, and complain twice as much about abdominal pain compared to peers. The results are reported in the April 28, 2014, online early edition of the journal Pediatrics. While parents frequently express concern regarding GI symptoms among children with ASD in pediatric settings, this study is the first meta-analysis of all published, peer-reviewed research relating to this topic. Continue reading

Increased prevalence of GI symptoms among children with autism, study confirms

Increased prevalence of GI symptoms among children with autism, study confirms

A new study conducted by researchers at Marcus Autism Center, Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta and Emory University School of Medicine indicates that children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) are more than four times more likely to experience general gastrointestinal (GI) complaints compared with peers, are more than three times as prone to experience constipation and diarrhea than peers, and complain twice as much about abdominal pain compared to peers. The results are reported in the April 28, 2014, online early edition of the journal Pediatrics. While parents frequently express concern regarding GI symptoms among children with ASD in pediatric settings, this study is the first meta-analysis of all published, peer-reviewed research relating to this topic. Continue reading

Blood cells reprogrammed into blood stem cells in mice

Blood cells reprogrammed into blood stem cells in mice

Researchers at Boston Children’s Hospital have reprogrammed mature blood cells from mice into blood-forming hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs), using a cocktail of eight genetic switches called transcription factors. Continue reading

Blood cells reprogrammed into blood stem cells in mice

Blood cells reprogrammed into blood stem cells in mice

Researchers at Boston Children’s Hospital have reprogrammed mature blood cells from mice into blood-forming hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs), using a cocktail of eight genetic switches called transcription factors. Continue reading

Pollutants from coal-burning stoves strongly associated with miscarriages in Mongolia

Pollutants from coal-burning stoves strongly associated with miscarriages in Mongolia

Burning coal for domestic heating may contribute to early fetal death according to a new study by experts from The Saban Research Institute of Children’s Hospital Los Angeles and Ulaanbaatar, Mongolia — the coldest capital city in the world. In a paper published today in the journal BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth , researchers report “alarmingly strong statistical correlations” between seasonal ambient air pollutants and pregnancy loss in Ulaanbaatar (UB), Mongolia. UB has one of the highest levels of air pollution of all world capitals, with sulfide dioxide and particulate matter levels during winter months, which are up to 23 times World Health Organization standards Continue reading

Fat metabolism in animals altered to prevent most common type of heart disease

Fat metabolism in animals altered to prevent most common type of heart disease

Working with mice and rabbits, Johns Hopkins scientists have found a way to block abnormal cholesterol production, transport and breakdown, successfully preventing the development of atherosclerosis, the main cause of heart attacks and strokes and the number-one cause of death among humans. The condition develops when fat builds inside blood vessels over time and renders them stiff, narrowed and hardened, greatly reducing their ability to feed oxygen-rich blood to the heart muscle and the brain. In a series of experiments, described April 7 in the journal Circulation , the Johns Hopkins team says it identified and halted the action of a single molecular culprit responsible for a range of biological glitches that affect the body’s ability to properly use, transport and purge itself of cholesterol — the fatty substance that accumulates inside vessels and fuels heart disease Continue reading

‘Brain training’ overcomes tics in Tourette syndrome, study finds

‘Brain training’ overcomes tics in Tourette syndrome, study finds

Teenagers diagnosed with Tourette Syndrome (TS) were slower than their typically developing peers when asked to perform a task that involved them simply moving their eyes to look at targets. However, they significantly outperformed their peers when the task was more demanding and required them to choose between looking at or away from targets. Continue reading

How kids’ brain structures grow as memory develops

How kids’ brain structures grow as memory develops

Our ability to store memories improves during childhood, associated with structural changes in the hippocampus and its connections with prefrontal and parietal cortices. New research from UC Davis is exploring how these brain regions develop at this crucial time. Eventually, that could give insights into disorders that typically emerge in the transition into and during adolescence and affect memory, such as schizophrenia and depression Continue reading