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Tag Archives: Children

Intake of dietary prenatal folate and other methyl donors in first trimester of pregnancy affects asthma risk in children at age 7

Intake of dietary prenatal folate and other methyl donors in first trimester of pregnancy affects asthma risk in children at age 7

Maternal intake of dietary methyl donors during the first trimester of pregnancy modulates the risk of developing childhood asthma at age 7, according to a new study presented at the 2014 American Thoracic Society International Conference. “Evidence on the effects of dietary methyl donor intake on childhood asthma has been mixed,” said lead author Michelle Trivedi, MD, Clinical Fellow in Pediatric Pulmonology at Massachusetts General Hospital for Children in Boston. Continue reading

Chronic insufficient sleep increases obesity, overall body fat in children

Chronic insufficient sleep increases obesity, overall body fat in children

One of the most comprehensive studies of the potential link between reduced sleep and childhood obesity finds compelling evidence that children who consistently received less than the recommended hours of sleep during infancy and early childhood had increases in both obesity and in adiposity or overall body fat at age 7. The study from MassGeneral Hospital for Children (MGHfC) investigators, published in the June issue of Pediatrics, also finds no evidence of a specific period during which insufficient sleep has greater influence on later obesity. “Our study found convincing evidence that getting less than recommended amounts of sleep across early childhood is an independent and strong risk factor for obesity and adiposity,” says Elsie Taveras, MD, MPH, chief of General Pediatrics at MGHfC and lead author of the Pediatrics paper. Continue reading

Global progress in preventing newborn deaths, stillbirths hindered by inadequate investment, leadership, measurement, accountability

Global progress in preventing newborn deaths, stillbirths hindered by inadequate investment, leadership, measurement, accountability

A major new Series of papers, published today in The Lancet , presents the clearest picture to date of progress and challenges in improving newborn survival around the world, and sets targets that must be achieved by 2030 in order to ensure every newborn has a healthy start. The research is led by Professor Joy Lawn, at the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine and Save the Children, UK, with Professor Zulfiqar Bhutta at the Hospital for Sick Children, Canada, and the Aga Khan University, Pakistan, in collaboration with more than 54 experts from 28 institutions in 17 countries, and provides the evidence base and foundation for the forthcoming Every Newborn Action Plan 1, an evidence-based roadmap towards care for every woman, and a healthy start for every newborn baby, which will be launched in June 2014. The Series shows that almost all of the 5.5 million newborn and stillborn babies who die every year enter and leave the world without a piece of paper; this lack of registration and official recognition reflects acceptance of these deaths as inevitable. Continue reading

Should cardiac screening guidelines for survivors of childhood cancer be reviewed?

Should cardiac screening guidelines for survivors of childhood cancer be reviewed?

One of the first studies to analyze the effectiveness of screening survivors of childhood cancer for early signs of impending congestive heart failure (CHF) finds improved health outcomes but suggests that less frequent screening than currently recommended may yield similar clinical benefit. Continue reading

Intake of dietary methyl donors in first trimester affects asthma risk in children

Intake of dietary methyl donors in first trimester affects asthma risk in children

Maternal intake of dietary methyl donors during the first trimester of pregnancy modulates the risk of developing childhood asthma at age 7, according to a new study presented at the 2014 American Thoracic Society International Conference. “Evidence on the effects of dietary methyl donor intake on childhood asthma has been mixed,” said lead author Michelle Trivedi, MD, Clinical Fellow in Pediatric Pulmonology at Massachusetts General Hospital for Children in Boston Continue reading

Ataluren Phase 3 trial results in nonsense mutation cystic fibrosis

Ataluren Phase 3 trial results in nonsense mutation cystic fibrosis

PTC Therapeutics, Inc. (NASDAQ: PTCT) today announced that the results of a Phase 3 study of ataluren in patients with nonsense mutation cystic fibrosis (nmCF) were published in Lancet Respiratory Medicine Continue reading

Mothers’ symptoms of depression predict how they respond to child behavior

Mothers’ symptoms of depression predict how they respond to child behavior

Depressive symptoms seem to focus mothers’ responses on minimizing their own distress, which may come at the expense of focusing on the impact their responses have on their children, according to research published in Psychological Science , a journal of the Association for Psychological Science. Depressive symptoms are common among mothers, and these symptoms are linked with worse developmental outcomes for children Continue reading

Rare, childhood neurodegenerative diseases linked to common problem in DNA repair

Rare, childhood neurodegenerative diseases linked to common problem in DNA repair

St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital scientists studying two rare, inherited childhood neurodegenerative disorders have identified a new, possibly common source of DNA damage that may play a role in other neurodegenerative diseases, cancer and aging. Continue reading

Improving air quality in NYC would boost children’s future earnings by increasing IQ

Improving air quality in NYC would boost children’s future earnings by increasing IQ

Reducing air pollution in New York City would result in substantial economic gains for children as a result of increasing their IQs. Continue reading

Family-based exposure therapy effective treatment for young children with OCD

Family-based exposure therapy effective treatment for young children with OCD

A new study from the Bradley Hasbro Children’s Research Center has found that family-based cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) is beneficial to young children between the ages of five and eight with Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD). The study, now published online in JAMA Psychiatry , found developmentally sensitive family-based CBT that included exposure/response prevention (EX/RP) was more effective in reducing OCD symptoms and functional impairment in this age group than a similarly structured relaxation program. Jennifer Freeman, PhD, a staff psychologist at the Bradley Hasbro Children’s Research Center and clinical co-director of the Intensive Program for OCD at Bradley Hospital, led the study. Continue reading