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Novel mechanism for invasion of EV71 virus demonstrated

Novel mechanism for invasion of EV71 virus demonstrated

Date: July 18, 2014 Source: Springer Summary: A novel mechanism for EV71 entry mediated by its receptor SCARB2 has been reported by scientists. These findings make a significant conceptual advance in the understanding of non-enveloped virus entry, to which EV71 belongs Continue reading

Extinct human cousin gave Tibetans advantage at high elevation

Extinct human cousin gave Tibetans advantage at high elevation

Tibetans were able to adapt to high altitudes thanks to a gene picked up when their ancestors mated with a species of human they helped push to extinction, according to a new report by University of California, Berkeley, scientists. An unusual variant of a gene involved in regulating the body’s production of hemoglobin — the molecule that carries oxygen in the blood — became widespread in Tibetans after they moved onto the high-altitude plateau several thousand years ago. This variant allowed them to survive despite low oxygen levels at elevations of 15,000 feet or more, whereas most people develop thick blood at high altitudes, leading to cardiovascular problems Continue reading

Nut allergy boy died after takeaway

Nut allergy boy died after takeaway

unable to retrieve full-text contentA teenager with a nut allergy died after eating a Chinese takeaway containing peanut butter, an inquest hears. Continue reading

Conditions linked to deadly bird flu revealed: High risk areas identified

Conditions linked to deadly bird flu revealed: High risk areas identified

A dangerous strain of avian influenza, H7N9, that’s causing severe illness and deaths in China may be inhabiting a small fraction of its potential range and appears at risk of spreading to other suitable areas of India, Bangladesh, Vietnam, Indonesia and the Philippines, according to a new study published today in the journal Nature Communications . Continue reading

Mechanism that forms cell-to-cell catch bonds found by researchers

Mechanism that forms cell-to-cell catch bonds found by researchers

Certain bonds connecting biological cells get stronger when they’re tugged. Those bonds could help keep hearts together and pumping; breakdowns of those bonds could help cancer cells break away and spread. Those bonds are known as catch bonds and they’re formed by common adhesion proteins called cadherins. Continue reading

Humans have a nose for gender: Chemical cues influence perceptions of movement as more masculine or feminine

Humans have a nose for gender: Chemical cues influence perceptions of movement as more masculine or feminine

The human body produces chemical cues that communicate gender to members of the opposite sex, according to researchers who report their findings in the Cell Press journal Current Biology on May 1. Whiffs of the active steroid ingredients (androstadienone in males and estratetraenol in females) influence our perceptions of movement as being either more masculine or more feminine Continue reading

Higher social class linked to fewer bone fractures among non-white women

Higher social class linked to fewer bone fractures among non-white women

If you are a middle-aged African-American or Asian woman, your social class may play a significant role in how likely you are to suffer bone fracutres, a UCLA-led study suggests. The study, published in the current issue of Osteoporosis International, is unique in that it followed Asian, African-American and white women for a period of nine years during mid-life; most previous studies on socioeconomic status and osteoporosis risk had focused solely on older white women and often had not collected information on fractures over time. The new findings help shed light on the importance of social class — and particularly education levels — in the fracture risk of mid-life women from different racial and ethnic groups, the researchers said Continue reading

Coffee Consumption Reduces Mortality Risk from Liver Cirrhosis

Coffee Consumption Reduces Mortality Risk from Liver Cirrhosis

New research reveals that consuming two or more cups of coffee each day reduces the risk of death from liver cirrhosis by 66%, specifically cirrhosis caused by non-viral hepatitis. Continue reading

Coal plant closure in China led to improvements in children’s health

Coal plant closure in China led to improvements in children’s health

Decreased exposure to air pollution in utero is linked with improved childhood developmental scores and higher levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), a key protein for brain development, according to a study looking at the closure of a coal-burning power plant in China led by researchers at the Columbia Center for Children’s Environmental Health at the Mailman School of Public Health. The study is the first to assess BDNF and cognitive development with respect to prenatal exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), a component of air pollution commonly emitted from coal burning. Results appear online in the journal PLOS ONE Continue reading

Coal plant closure in China led to improvements in children’s health

Coal plant closure in China led to improvements in children’s health

Decreased exposure to air pollution in utero is linked with improved childhood developmental scores and higher levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), a key protein for brain development, according to a study looking at the closure of a coal-burning power plant in China led by researchers at the Columbia Center for Children’s Environmental Health at the Mailman School of Public Health. The study is the first to assess BDNF and cognitive development with respect to prenatal exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), a component of air pollution commonly emitted from coal burning. Results appear online in the journal PLOS ONE Continue reading