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Tag Archives: Chinese

A heart-felt need for dairy food: Small serving beneficial, large not necessary

A heart-felt need for dairy food: Small serving beneficial, large not necessary

A daily small serve of dairy food may reduce the risk of heart disease or stroke, even in communities where such foods have not traditionally formed part of the diet. A study of nearly 4000 Taiwanese, led by Emeritus Professor Mark Wahlqvist from Monash University’s Department of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine and the Monash Asia Institute, considered the role increased consumption of dairy foods had played in the country’s gains in health and longevity Continue reading

Quarter of people with diabetes worldwide live in China, but new approach could help transform their care

Quarter of people with diabetes worldwide live in China, but new approach could help transform their care

Diabetes has become a major public health crisis in China, with an annual projected cost of 360 billion RMB (nearly 35 billion British pounds) by 2030, but a new collaborative approach to care that uses registries and community support could help improve diabetes care, according to a new three-part Series about diabetes in China published in The Lancet Diabetes & Endocrinology . China has the largest number of people with diabetes of any country in the world, and the disease has reached epidemic proportions in the adult population Continue reading

Quarter of people with diabetes worldwide live in China, but new approach could help transform their care

Quarter of people with diabetes worldwide live in China, but new approach could help transform their care

Diabetes has become a major public health crisis in China, with an annual projected cost of 360 billion RMB (nearly 35 billion British pounds) by 2030, but a new collaborative approach to care that uses registries and community support could help improve diabetes care, according to a new three-part Series about diabetes in China published in The Lancet Diabetes & Endocrinology . China has the largest number of people with diabetes of any country in the world, and the disease has reached epidemic proportions in the adult population. In 1980, less than 1% of Chinese adults had diabetes, but this increased to almost 12% (113.9 million adults) by 2010 Continue reading

Experts denounce clinical trials of unscientific, ‘alternative’ medicines

Experts denounce clinical trials of unscientific, ‘alternative’ medicines

Experts writing in the Cell Press journal Trends in Molecular Medicine on August 20th call for an end to clinical trials of “highly implausible treatments” such as homeopathy and reiki. Continue reading

Scientists confirm effectiveness of cognitive rehabilitation in MS

Scientists confirm effectiveness of cognitive rehabilitation in MS

Date: August 8, 2014 Source: Kessler Foundation Summary: In individuals with MS, patterns of brain activity associated with learning were maintained at six months post training, scientists report in a new article following up on a long term study. For the pilot study, participants underwent evaluation of memory performance and brain activity at baseline, immediately following memory retraining, and at 6-month followup. Results showed that the patterns of increased cerebral activation that correlated with learning were maintained at 6-month followup Continue reading

Scientists confirm effectiveness of cognitive rehabilitation in MS

Scientists confirm effectiveness of cognitive rehabilitation in MS

Date: August 8, 2014 Source: Kessler Foundation Summary: In individuals with MS, patterns of brain activity associated with learning were maintained at six months post training, scientists report in a new article following up on a long term study. Continue reading

Flores bones show features of Down syndrome, not a new ‘Hobbit’ human

Flores bones show features of Down syndrome, not a new ‘Hobbit’ human

In October 2004, excavation of fragmentary skeletal remains from the island of Flores in Indonesia yielded what was called “the most important find in human evolution for 100 years.” Its discoverers dubbed the find Homo floresiensis, a name suggesting a previously unknown species of human. Now detailed reanalysis by an international team of researchers including Robert B. Eckhardt, professor of developmental genetics and evolution at Penn State, Maciej Henneberg, professor of anatomy and pathology at the University of Adelaide, and Kenneth Hsü, a Chinese geologist and paleoclimatologist, suggests that the single specimen on which the new designation depends, known as LB1, does not represent a new species. Continue reading

Novel mechanism for invasion of EV71 virus demonstrated

Novel mechanism for invasion of EV71 virus demonstrated

Date: July 18, 2014 Source: Springer Summary: A novel mechanism for EV71 entry mediated by its receptor SCARB2 has been reported by scientists. These findings make a significant conceptual advance in the understanding of non-enveloped virus entry, to which EV71 belongs Continue reading

Extinct human cousin gave Tibetans advantage at high elevation

Extinct human cousin gave Tibetans advantage at high elevation

Tibetans were able to adapt to high altitudes thanks to a gene picked up when their ancestors mated with a species of human they helped push to extinction, according to a new report by University of California, Berkeley, scientists. An unusual variant of a gene involved in regulating the body’s production of hemoglobin — the molecule that carries oxygen in the blood — became widespread in Tibetans after they moved onto the high-altitude plateau several thousand years ago. This variant allowed them to survive despite low oxygen levels at elevations of 15,000 feet or more, whereas most people develop thick blood at high altitudes, leading to cardiovascular problems Continue reading

Nut allergy boy died after takeaway

Nut allergy boy died after takeaway

unable to retrieve full-text contentA teenager with a nut allergy died after eating a Chinese takeaway containing peanut butter, an inquest hears. Continue reading