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Tag Archives: College

New cancer drug to begin trials in multiple myeloma patients

New cancer drug to begin trials in multiple myeloma patients

Scientists at Imperial College London have developed a new cancer drug which they plan to trial in multiple myeloma patients by the end of next year. In a paper published today in the journal Cancer Cell , the researchers report how the drug, known as DTP3, kills myeloma cells in laboratory tests in human cells and mice, without causing any toxic side effects, which is the main problem with most other cancer drugs. The new drug works by stopping a key process that allows cancer cells to multiply Continue reading

Ebola research shows rapid control interventions key factor in preventing spread

Ebola research shows rapid control interventions key factor in preventing spread

New Ebola research demonstrates that quick and forceful implementation of control interventions are necessary to control outbreaks and avoid far worse scenarios. Continue reading

Intervention helps decrease ‘mean girl’ behaviors, researchers find

Intervention helps decrease ‘mean girl’ behaviors, researchers find

Relational aggression, or “mean girl” bullying, is a popular subject in news and entertainment media. This nonphysical form of aggression generally used among adolescent girls includes gossiping, rumor spreading, exclusion and rejection. As media coverage has illustrated, relational aggression can lead to tragic and sometimes fatal outcomes. Continue reading

Longitudinal report shows challenging reality of aging with an intellectual disability

Longitudinal report shows challenging reality of aging with an intellectual disability

A new report launched today by the Intellectual Disability Supplement to TILDA (The Irish Longitudinal Study on aging) conducted by academics from the School of Nursing and Midwifery, Trinity College Dublin, Ireland, has highlighted the serious, complex and unique health and social challenges facing Ireland’s intellectual disability population. The IDS-TILDA study is the first study of its kind in Europe and the only one in the world with the ability to compare the aging of people with intellectual disability directly with the general aging population. For the first time in history, people in Ireland with an intellectual disability are growing old in considerable numbers Continue reading

Medications are main culprit of allergic deaths in U.S., comprehensive study finds

Medications are main culprit of allergic deaths in U.S., comprehensive study finds

Medications are the leading cause of allergy-related sudden deaths in the U.S., according to an analysis of death certificates from 1999 to 2010, conducted by researchers at Montefiore Medical Center and Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University. The study, published online today in the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology , also found that the risk of fatal drug-induced allergic reactions was particularly high among older people and African-Americans and that such deaths increased significantly in the U.S. in recent years Continue reading

Potential biomarker to detect SCID (severe combined immunodeficiency)

Potential biomarker to detect SCID (severe combined immunodeficiency)

A genetic disease called SCID, short for severe combined immunodeficiency, forces patients to breathe filtered air and avoid human contact because their bodies’ natural defenses are too weak to fight germs. Although it affects fewer than 2,000 new births each year worldwide, SCID is a cousin to acquired immune deficiency syndrome triggered by a human immunodeficiency virus — HIV/AIDS Continue reading

Cardiology leaders call for global prevention of heart disease, stroke

Cardiology leaders call for global prevention of heart disease, stroke

Heart disease and stroke contribute to 30 percent of global deaths, more than all infectious and parasitic diseases combined, and 11 cardiovascular organizations are calling for the United Nations to address prevention of heart disease and other non-communicable diseases. In a statement published in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology and other cardiology journals, the World Heart Federation’s Global Cardiovascular Disease Taskforce — which is comprised of cardiologists and health advocates from the World Heart Federation, African Heart Network, Asia Pacific Heart Network, Asian Pacific Society of Cardiology, American Heart Association, American College of Cardiology, European Heart Network, European Society of Cardiology, InterAmerican Heart Foundation, InterAmerican Society of Cardiology, and the Pan-African Society of Cardiology — calls for the United Nations to support efforts to curb the world-wide rise in non-communicable diseases including heart disease and stroke Continue reading

Biomarkers, stem cells offer new ways to treat deadly gut disease in premature babies

Biomarkers, stem cells offer new ways to treat deadly gut disease in premature babies

Premature babies face a host of medical challenges at birth, but none as deadly and mysterious as a disease called necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC). The condition creates an inexplicable combination of inflammation and infection that causes parts of the intestine to die. NEC progresses at a ruthless speed, leaving physicians with few options — typically supportive care, emergency surgery or antibiotics Continue reading

Bacterial ‘communication system’ could be used to stop, kill cancer cells, study finds

Bacterial ‘communication system’ could be used to stop, kill cancer cells, study finds

Cancer, while always dangerous, truly becomes life-threatening when cancer cells begin to spread to different areas throughout the body. Now, researchers at the University of Missouri have discovered that a molecule used as a communication system by bacteria can be manipulated to prevent cancer cells from spreading. Senthil Kumar, an assistant research professor and assistant director of the Comparative Oncology and Epigenetics Laboratory at the MU College of Veterinary Medicine, says this communication system can be used to “tell” cancer cells how to act, or even to die on command. Continue reading

Medical students who attended community college likelier to serve poor communities

Medical students who attended community college likelier to serve poor communities

The community college system represents a potential source of student diversity for medical schools and physicians who will serve poor communities; however, there are significant challenges to enhancing the pipeline from community colleges to four-year universities to medical schools. The authors recommend that medical school and four-year university recruitment, outreach and admissions practices be more inclusive of community college students. Researchers from UCLA, UC San Francisco and San Jose City College found that, among students who apply to and attend medical school, those from underrepresented minority backgrounds are more likely than white and Asian students to have attended a community college at some point Continue reading