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Tag Archives: College

Clean smell doesn’t always mean clean air

Clean smell doesn’t always mean clean air

Some of the same chemical reactions that occur in the atmosphere as a result of smog and ozone are actually taking place in your house while you are cleaning. A researcher in Drexel’s College of Engineering is taking a closer look at these reactions, which involve an organic compound -called limonene- that provides the pleasant smell of cleaning products and air fresheners. His research will help to determine what byproducts these sweet-smelling compounds are adding to the air while we are using them to remove germs and odors. Continue reading

Governments should take active lead to create healthy food environments to prevent cardiovascular disease

Governments should take active lead to create healthy food environments to prevent cardiovascular disease

Canadian health organizations are calling upon governments to take a leadership role in creating healthy food environments. They say that implementing strategies that facilitate access to affordable healthy foods and beverages in places where Canadians work, live, and play could play a key role in preventing diet-related disease and health risk such as obesity and hypertension, and ultimately improve cardiovascular health. This call for action is published in the Canadian Journal of Cardiology Continue reading

Thermal paper cash register receipts account for high bisphenol A (BPA) levels  in humans

Thermal paper cash register receipts account for high bisphenol A (BPA) levels in humans

Bisphenol A (BPA) is a chemical that is used in a variety of consumer products, such as water bottles, dental composites and resins used to line metal food and beverage containers, and also is used in thermal paper cash register receipts. Now, research conducted at the University of Missouri is providing the first data that BPA from thermal paper used in cash register receipts accounts for high levels of BPA in humans. Subjects studied showed a rapid increase of BPA in their blood after using a skin care product and then touching a store receipt with BPA Continue reading

Treatment for osteoporosis, bone cancer, employed for the first time in dental filling procedures

Treatment for osteoporosis, bone cancer, employed for the first time in dental filling procedures

Journal of Dental Research publishes a paper directed by Salvatore Sauro, Professor at University CEU Cardenal Herrera in Spain, in collaboration with international researchers from Finland, Brazil, United States and United Kingdom. The research report has demonstrated how the use of zoledronic acid, in combination with bioactive ion-releasing resin-based restorative materials used as dental adhesive, reduces the degradation of dentin collagen and promotes remineralisation at the resin-dentine interface. Continue reading

New cancer drug to begin trials in multiple myeloma patients

New cancer drug to begin trials in multiple myeloma patients

Scientists at Imperial College London have developed a new cancer drug which they plan to trial in multiple myeloma patients by the end of next year. In a paper published today in the journal Cancer Cell , the researchers report how the drug, known as DTP3, kills myeloma cells in laboratory tests in human cells and mice, without causing any toxic side effects, which is the main problem with most other cancer drugs. The new drug works by stopping a key process that allows cancer cells to multiply Continue reading

Ebola research shows rapid control interventions key factor in preventing spread

Ebola research shows rapid control interventions key factor in preventing spread

New Ebola research demonstrates that quick and forceful implementation of control interventions are necessary to control outbreaks and avoid far worse scenarios. Continue reading

Intervention helps decrease ‘mean girl’ behaviors, researchers find

Intervention helps decrease ‘mean girl’ behaviors, researchers find

Relational aggression, or “mean girl” bullying, is a popular subject in news and entertainment media. This nonphysical form of aggression generally used among adolescent girls includes gossiping, rumor spreading, exclusion and rejection. As media coverage has illustrated, relational aggression can lead to tragic and sometimes fatal outcomes. Continue reading

Longitudinal report shows challenging reality of aging with an intellectual disability

Longitudinal report shows challenging reality of aging with an intellectual disability

A new report launched today by the Intellectual Disability Supplement to TILDA (The Irish Longitudinal Study on aging) conducted by academics from the School of Nursing and Midwifery, Trinity College Dublin, Ireland, has highlighted the serious, complex and unique health and social challenges facing Ireland’s intellectual disability population. The IDS-TILDA study is the first study of its kind in Europe and the only one in the world with the ability to compare the aging of people with intellectual disability directly with the general aging population. For the first time in history, people in Ireland with an intellectual disability are growing old in considerable numbers Continue reading

Medications are main culprit of allergic deaths in U.S., comprehensive study finds

Medications are main culprit of allergic deaths in U.S., comprehensive study finds

Medications are the leading cause of allergy-related sudden deaths in the U.S., according to an analysis of death certificates from 1999 to 2010, conducted by researchers at Montefiore Medical Center and Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University. The study, published online today in the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology , also found that the risk of fatal drug-induced allergic reactions was particularly high among older people and African-Americans and that such deaths increased significantly in the U.S. in recent years Continue reading

Potential biomarker to detect SCID (severe combined immunodeficiency)

Potential biomarker to detect SCID (severe combined immunodeficiency)

A genetic disease called SCID, short for severe combined immunodeficiency, forces patients to breathe filtered air and avoid human contact because their bodies’ natural defenses are too weak to fight germs. Although it affects fewer than 2,000 new births each year worldwide, SCID is a cousin to acquired immune deficiency syndrome triggered by a human immunodeficiency virus — HIV/AIDS Continue reading