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Tag Archives: College

Bullied children still suffer at 50

Bullied children still suffer at 50

unable to retrieve full-text contentChildren can experience the negative effects of bullying on their physical and mental health more than 40 years later, says a study from King’s College London. Continue reading

Dog ownership benefits families of children with autism

Dog ownership benefits families of children with autism

Many families face the decision of whether to get a dog. For families of children with autism, the decision can be even more challenging. Now, a University of Missouri researcher has studied dog ownership decisions in families of children with autism and found, regardless of whether they owned dogs, the parents reported the benefits of dog ownership included companionship, stress relief and opportunities for their children to learn responsibility. Continue reading

Low vitamin D linked to fatty liver disease in UK children

Low vitamin D linked to fatty liver disease in UK children

A UK studyi investigating the link between low vitamin D status and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) in British children has identified a genetic variant associated with the disease’s severity. The research, conducted by the King’s College Hospital Paediatric Liver Centre and the University of Surrey’s School of Biosciences and Medicine, and funded by the Children’s Liver Disease Foundation retrospectively analysed the medical records of 120 paediatric patients with NAFLD. The findings could carry significant implications for UK clinicians in light of the nation’s rising number of childhood NAFLD cases. Continue reading

Stressful environments genetically affect African American boys

Stressful environments genetically affect African American boys

Stressful upbringings can leave imprints on the genes of children as young as age 9, according to a study led by Princeton University and Pennsylvania State University researchers. Such chronic stress during youth leads to physiological weathering similar to aging. A study of 40 9-year-old black boys, published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences , shows that those who grow up in disadvantaged environments have shorter telomeres — DNA sequences that generally shrink with age — than their advantaged peers Continue reading

Small cash incentives dramatically improve hepatitis B vaccination rates among injecting drug users

Small cash incentives dramatically improve hepatitis B vaccination rates among injecting drug users

Small financial incentives, totalling as little as £30, can dramatically increase the likelihood of people who inject drugs completing a course of hepatitis B virus (HBV) vaccination, according to new research published in The Lancet . Researchers in the UK found that people undergoing treatment for heroin addiction who received a maximum total of £30 supermarket vouchers in equal or graduated installments in return for full compliance with a regimen of three HBV vaccine injections were at least 12 times as likely to complete the course within 28 days compared to those not receiving a financial incentive (45% for equal payment installments and 49% for graduated payment installments vs 9% for no payment incentive). The study was led by Professor John Strang from the National Addiction Centre at King’s College London, UK, working in close collaboration with senior colleagues at Imperial College London and University College London (UCL), in the UK Continue reading

Consumer, be aware: Quality of health-related internet searches varies

Consumer, be aware: Quality of health-related internet searches varies

If you’re like most people, you’ve gone online to find out what’s causing that ringing in your ears or whether a gluten-free diet is worth considering. Be careful. Continue reading

Work with small peptide chains may revolutionize study of enzymes, diseases

Work with small peptide chains may revolutionize study of enzymes, diseases

Chemists in The College of Arts and Sciences have, for the first time, created enzyme-like activity using peptides that are only seven amino acids long. Continue reading

Flipping the switch on scleroderma

Flipping the switch on scleroderma

Scleroderma is a rare and often fatal disease, causing the thickening of tissue, that currently lacks a cure and any effective treatments. A group of researchers, including a Michigan State University professor, is looking to change that. “Our findings provide a new approach to developing better treatment options where few have existed,” said Richard Neubig, chairperson of the Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology in MSU’s College of Osteopathic Medicine Continue reading

Researchers identify how zinc regulates key enzyme involved in cell death

Researchers identify how zinc regulates key enzyme involved in cell death

The molecular details of how zinc, an essential trace element of human metabolism, interacts with the enzyme caspase-3, which is central to apoptosis or cell death, have been elucidated in a new study led by researchers at Virginia Commonwealth University. Continue reading

Eating seven or more portions of fruit and vegetables a day reduces your risk of death by 42 percent

Eating seven or more portions of fruit and vegetables a day reduces your risk of death by 42 percent

Eating seven or more portions of fruit and vegetables a day reduces your risk of death at any point in time by 42% compared to eating less than one portion, reports a new UCL study. Researchers used the Health Survey for England to study the eating habits of 65,226 people representative of the English population between 2001 and 2013, and found that the more fruit and vegetables they ate, the less likely they were to die at any age. Continue reading